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485 records – page 1 of 25.

Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Traditional healing
Sharing & Teaching
Alaska Natives
Indians
North American
Research Personnel
Minority Groups
Abstract
Health information for Native Americans and Alaska Natives, personal stories, researcher and educator resources, and general health information about traditional healing,
Online Resources
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Native Americans: traditional healing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77743
Source
Urol Nurs. 2007 Apr;27(2):161-3, 173
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Broome, B.
Broome, R.
Author Affiliation
The University of South Alabama College of Nursing, Mobile, AL, USA.
Source
Urol Nurs. 2007 Apr;27(2):161-3, 173
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Phytotherapy
Prostatitis - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
There are an estimated 4.1 million people who are classified as American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination with one or more other races. This racial group composes 1.5% of the total U.S. population. The leading causes of illness and death among American Indians are heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries (accidents), diabetes, and stroke. American Indians also have a high prevalence of obesity, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, and are at increased risk for mental health issues and suicide. In an effort to build a trusted relationship with these patients and become an active participant in their care, the health care provider must demonstrate respect for the traditions of the American Indian.
PubMed ID
17494460 View in PubMed
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Source
Presentation given at 123rd annual American Public Health Association meeting, San Diego, California, November 1995
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
Morgan, R.
Source
Presentation given at 123rd annual American Public Health Association meeting, San Diego, California, November 1995
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Contemporary medicine
Healing practices
Indigenous people
Traditional healing
Abstract
Before contact, the indigenous people of Alaska depended on knowledge of anatomy, herbal medicine, and other healing practices for health maintenance. With contact, a social system that had been ideally suited to its purpose was destroyed and replaced by another, ill-suited to the temperament as well as to the social, physiological, and psychological needs of the Alaskan Native.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 101971.
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Annotated Bibliography - Traditional Healing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288402
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
PDF
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Traditional healing
Sharing & Teaching
Alaska Natives
Health promotion
Delivery of Health Care
Abstract
Primarily unpublished literature on "Alaska Native Traditional Healing" which is defined as Alaska Native beliefs and practices on illness, disease prevention, and health promotion. (PDF, 112KB)
Online Resources
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Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2828
Source
Pages 10-12 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Keynote Speaker Traditional Healing among Alaska Natives Rachel Craig Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska, USA In the best of worlds we like to think of ourselves as invincible, healthy, strong, and liv- ing the good life to a wise, old age. Sometimes we fool ourselves into believing these
  1 document  
Author
Craig, R.
Source
Pages 10-12 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Forecasting
Health knowledge
Health Services, Indigenous
Inuit
Traditional healing
Documents
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Native American medicine: Traditional healing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76437
Source
JAMA. 1991 May 1;265(17):2271, 2273
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
Avery, C
Author Affiliation
University of Arizona College of Medicine
Source
JAMA. 1991 May 1;265(17):2271, 2273
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Native American medicine
Traditional healing
Abstract
Discusses the use of traditional healing among Native Americans; the relationship between medicine and religion among Native Americans; comparisons between traditional Native American medical practice and Western medicine; differences in the medical practices among Native American tribes.
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Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76511
Date
March 2006
Candidacy Essay # 3 TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES By Michele Riley Kramer 425 S. Linden Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 Phone: 630-968-3279 Email: mkramer26@hotmail.com Candidacy Essay Course 9020 Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center San Francisco, California March, 2006
  1 document  
Author
Kramer, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center
Date
March 2006
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Native
Aleut
Traditional healing
Traditional healer
Yup'ik
Haida
Allopathic Medicine
Tsimshian
Inuit
Tlingit
Shamans
Athabascan
Notes
Graduate candidate essay, author did much of her research in Alaska
Documents

TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES.PDF

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Traditional healing practices among First Nations students

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102053
Source
Canadian Journal of Counselling. 2000;34(1):14-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
  1 website  
Author
Wyrostok, NC
Paulson, BL
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Counselling. 2000;34(1):14-24
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
First Nations
Traditional healing
Abstract
Traditional Native healing practices are an important aspect of the First Nations peoples' conception of health and well-being. The purpose of this study was to assess post-secondary First Nations students' attitudes toward traditional Native healing practices. First Nations adult volunteers were surveyed in several adult educational settings to appraise their attitudes towards traditional healing practices in terms of their interest, valuing, and participation. The majority of subjects reported having participated in a diversity of Native healing practices. Implications of the prevalence of these beliefs and practices are discussed and recommendations for counsellors are offered.
Online Resources
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The experience of indigenous traditional healing and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180998
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Sarcoma - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Indigenous traditional healing is an ancient, deeply rooted, complex holistic health care system practiced by indigenous people worldwide. However, scant information exists to explain the phenomenon of indigenous medicine and indigenous health. Even less is known about how indigenous healing takes place. The purpose of this study is to describe the meaning and essence of the lived experience of 4 indigenous people who have been diagnosed with cancer and have used indigenous traditional healing during their healing journey. The researcher used a qualitative phenomenological methodology to collect and analyze interview data. Interviews were conducted with 4 self-identified indigenous people, ages 49 to 61, from diverse tribes. Time since cancer diagnosis varied from 2 to 20 years; types of cancer included lung, prostate, sarcoma of the leg, and breast. Four themes and 2 subthemes emerged (1) receiving the cancer diagnosis (with subthemes of knowing something was wrong and hearing something was wrong), (2) seeking healing, (3) connecting to indigenous culture, and (4) contemplating life's future. This study demonstrates that 4 individuals with cancer integrated Western medicine and traditional healing to treat their cancer. This knowledge provides necessary data about the phenomena of being healed by indigenous healers. Such data may serve as an initial guide for health care professionals while interacting with indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Accordingly, traditional healing may be used to decrease health disparities.
PubMed ID
15035869 View in PubMed
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Integrating traditional healing practices into counseling and psychotherapy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76432
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2005.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2005.
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Counseling
Medicine
Psychotherapy
Spiritual healing
Spiritual Therapies
Abstract
Integrating Traditional Healing Practices Into Counseling and Psychotherapy critically examines ethnic minority cultural and traditional healing in relation to counseling and psychotherapy. Authors Roy Moodley and William West highlight the challenges and transformations within the field of multicultural counseling and psychotherapy by integrating current debates and issues of traditional healing with contemporary practice. The book uniquely presents a range of theoretical and empirical accounts of the dilemmas and issues facing students in training, professional counselors, psychotherapists, social workers, researchers, and others who use multicultural counseling or transcultural psychotherapy as part of their professional practice.
Notes
Consortium Library owns this title: WB880.I61 2005
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Traditional healing and allopathic medicine: issues at the interface

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2842
Source
Pages 62-66 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Traditional Healing and Allopathic Medicine: Issues at the Interface Douglas Eby Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA Abstract: There is increasing interest m Native traditional healers and the possibility of their working in some form of relationship with the allopathic
  1 document  
Author
Eby, D.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, AK
Source
Pages 62-66 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Health care delivery
Traditional healing
Abstract
There is increasing interest in Native traditional healers and the possibility of their working in some form of relationship with the allopathic medical system. It represents a resurgence of effort in an area of great potential benefit to the Native community, but is rife with issues that could destroy the effort at any number of stages in the process. Issues related to professional and institutional responsibility, the power of medicalization, physical and philosophical interactions of the systems of healing, measures of effectiveness, issues of reimbursement, and many more must be dealt with in an intentional and thorough manner if the process is to be successful.
Documents
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Annotated bibliography of unpublished literature on Alaska Native traditional healing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77035
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Date
2005
Annotated Bibliography of Unpublished Literature On Alaska Native Traditional Healing This collection is housed at the Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. It is primarily unpublished literature (“gray” and “black”) on the subject of “Alaska Native
  1 document  
Date
2005
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Traditional healing
Documents

hsu_grayliterature_ICHS_traditionalhealing.pdf

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Tribal doctor candidates expand traditional program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2509
Source
Northwest Arctic NUNA. 3:3.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Source
Northwest Arctic NUNA. 3:3.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Empirical healing
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Native Hawaiian traditional healing: culturally based interventions for social work practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190161
Source
Soc Work. 2002 Apr;47(2):183-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Donna E Hurdle
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287-1802, USA. donna.hurdle@asu.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2002 Apr;47(2):183-92
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Ethnic Groups
Hawaii
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Pacific Islands - ethnology
Professional Competence
Social Work - manpower - methods - standards
Transcultural Nursing
Abstract
Developing cultural competence is a key requirement for social workers in the multicultural environment of the 21st century. However, the development of social work interventions that are syntonic with specific cultural groups is a great challenge. Interventions that are based on the traditional healing practices of a particular culture ensure cultural relevance and consistency with its values and worldview. This article discusses the importance of culturally based interventions within a cultural competence framework and offers examples of such interventions used with Native Hawaiians. Two interventions are discussed, targeted to the micro (direct practice) level and macro (community practice) level of practice. Culturally based social work interventions may be most appropriate for client systems within a particular culture; however, some methods, such as ho'oponopono, have been successfully used with clients from other cultures as well.
PubMed ID
12019805 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Report
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Digital File Format
PDF
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Traditional healing
Sharing & Teaching
Medicine
Traditional
Indians
North American
Abstract
A traditional healing model developed by Robert Morgan, PhD. (PDF, 1.19 MB)
Online Resources
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Discrimination and participation in traditional healing for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112532
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Jacquelene F Moghaddam
Sandra L Momper
Timothy Fong
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, jacquelene@post.harvard.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2013 Dec;38(6):1115-23
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Female
Great Lakes Region - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine, Traditional - utilization
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Discrimination - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Contemporary American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) who live in urban areas today face the daunting task of navigating an urban landscape while maintaining the facets of their respective Native cultures. While AIs/ANs continue to grapple with the intergenerational trauma associated with forced assimilation, relocation movements, and boarding schools, these traumas have manifested themselves in elevated rates of psychopathology. AIs/ANs have elevated rates of domestic abuse, poverty, suicide, and substance misuse. Furthermore, AIs/ANs, like many other minority cultures often face discrimination in their everyday lives. In light of the aversive experiences they face, AI/AN people have followed the tenets of ritual and traditional healing to address imbalances in the body, mind, and spirit. For providers working with AI/AN clients, it is important to understand who is using traditional healing and why they are using alternative services. Secondary data analyses of survey data from 389 urban AIs/ANs were utilized in order to determine the relationship between experiences of discrimination and traditional healing use. Analyses indicated that experiences of discrimination in healthcare settings were significantly associated with participation in traditional healing. Analyses also indicated that nearly a quarter of the sample reported discrimination in a healthcare setting, roughly half of the sample had used traditional healing, and that the majority of those who had used traditional healing were women, and ages 35-44 (27%). This study calls attention to the socio-demographic factors implicated in traditional healing use by urban AI/AN people, in addition to the clinical and demographic characteristics of this sample.
PubMed ID
23821254 View in PubMed
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Qualitative study of the use of traditional healing by asthmatic Navajo families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3813
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2003;11(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Van Sickle, D.
Morgan, F.
Wright, A.L.
Author Affiliation
Arizona Respiratory Center and Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Tucson 85724, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2003;11(1):1-18
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Philosophy, Medical
Qualitative Research
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spiritual Therapies
Abstract
Despite increasing prevalence of asthma among American Indians and/or Alaska Natives, little is known about their use of traditional healing in its management. A convenience sample of 24 Navajo families with asthmatic members (n=35) was interviewed between June 1997 and September 1998. While 46% of families had previously used traditional healing, only 29% sought traditional healing for asthma. Use of traditional healing was unrelated to use of biomedical therapies, hospitalizations, or emergency services. Practical factors and questions about the nature and origins of asthma were the primary considerations determining use of traditional medicine. Little conflict between traditional healing and biomedical treatment was reported. The use of traditional healing for asthma is influenced by beliefs about the disease and factors specific to the individual, including their local social, economic, and cultural context.
PubMed ID
12955629 View in PubMed
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Native American health: traditional healing and culturally competent health care internet resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167995
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2006;25(3):67-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Danielle Carlock
Author Affiliation
Arizona State University at the Polytechnic Campus, Mesa, AZ 85212, USA. danielle.carlock@asu.edu
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2006;25(3):67-76
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Directories as Topic
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Medical Informatics
Medicine, Traditional
United States
Abstract
Health disparities between Native Americans and the general population of the United States are a major health concern. Traditional healing and culturally competent health care offer much promise in raising the health status of Native Americans. Traditional healing, although uniquely practiced by each indigenous culture, is generally a system of medicine based on the inseparability of mind, body, and spirit. Culturally competent health care, care that is congruent with the culture and language of the patient, is a growing initiative in western medicine. This article outlines Internet sites and online resources relevant to the study and practice of traditional healing and culturally competent health care.
PubMed ID
16893848 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Article
Date
[1994]
Author
Morgan, R
Wilson, K
Ferguson, K
Henkelman, C
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation
Date
[1994]
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Allopathic Medicine
Healing
Traditional healing
Traditional medicine
Western medicine
Abstract
Transcript of discussion meeting with Dr. Robert Morgan, Kathy Wilson, Dr. Karen Ferguson, and Candyce Henkelman.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 102037.
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Comparative use of biomedical services and traditional healing options by American Indian veterans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196220
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Jan;52(1):68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
D. Gurley
D K Novins
M C Jones
J. Beals
J H Shore
S M Manson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80220, USA.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Jan;52(1):68-74
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - utilization
Hospitals, Veterans - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Questionnaires
Southwestern United States
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Veterans - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study described service use among American Indian veterans, compared use patterns across biomedical care and traditional healing options, and tested whether utilization varied as a function of need or availability.
A cross-sectional survey of 621 male combat veterans selected from tribal rolls was conducted between 1992 and 1995 in American Indian reservation communities in the Southwest and in the Northern Plains. Measures included assessments of demographic characteristics, physical and mental health conditions, and self-reports of any use during the past year of Veterans Administration (VA), Indian Health Service (IHS), and other biomedical services as well as participation in traditional ceremonies and use of indigenous healing options.
Tribal groups were similar in sociodemographic characteristics and in number of health problems and mental and substance use problems during the past year. The same types of services from IHS were available to the two groups, and the geographic distance to these services was similar. VA facilities were more readily available in the Northern Plains than in the Southwest, where they were far from reservation boundaries. Use of IHS services was similar for the two tribal groups, but use of VA services was significantly less in the Southwest. Overall, biomedical services were used more in the Northern Plains, reflecting greater use of VA facilities. However, these differences in overall health service disappeared when traditional healing options were considered. Use of traditional healing was greater in the Southwest, offsetting lower biomedical service use.
When the full array of options is examined, service use functions according to need for health care, but the kind of services used varies according to availability.
PubMed ID
11141531 View in PubMed
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485 records – page 1 of 25.