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Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;20(6):333-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
A M Syrjälä
M L Knuuttila
L K Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Dec;20(6):333-7
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Dental Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dependency (Psychology)
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Education
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Oral Hygiene - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Toothbrushing - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this work was to develop a method based on the idea of intrinsic motivation for analyzing motivation problems in dental care. A questionnaire dealing with intrinsic motivation was filled in by 207 women and 183 men. Factor analysis of the scale revealed the following dimensions of internal-external motivation: independence, responsibility, vs. non-independence, interest in preserving one's own teeth as long as possible vs. preference for tooth extraction, satisfaction from brushing teeth vs. brushing for others' sake, and critical evaluation of diet vs. improper diet with carbohydrates. The reliability of the questionnaire was good (standardized item alpha .69). The individual's own sense of independence and responsibility and the idea of preserving one's own teeth for as long as possible were found to be more important for the women than for the men. A longer education was also found to be related to preserving one's own teeth as long as possible. The time of the last dental visit was positively related to independence, responsibility and the far-reaching idea of preserving one's own teeth. It can be concluded that aspects of intrinsic motivation can give additional information when trying to understand dental health behavior.
PubMed ID
1464227 View in PubMed
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Locus of control beliefs predicting oral and diabetes health behavior and health status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47949
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):127-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M C Kneckt
A M Syrjälä
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. mkneckt@hotmail.com
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Jun;57(3):127-31
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care
Dental Caries - pathology
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology - therapy
Female
Forecasting
Health Behavior
Health status
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene Index
Patient compliance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Root Caries - pathology
Self Care
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Our study evaluates the correlation between dental and diabetes locus of control beliefs and the potentiality of locus of control beliefs in predicting oral health behavior, dental status, diabetes compliance, and HbA1c level by using situation-specific locus of control scales and considering the value dimension. Data were collected by means of a quantitative questionnaire, a clinical oral examination and patient records. The research population comprised 149 insulin-dependent diabetics who had teeth of their own. Variables were the frequencies of tooth brushing and dental visiting, oral indexes, diabetes adherence, and HbA1c level. Dental and diabetes locus of control beliefs correlated with each other. Dental locus of control associated with frequency of dental visiting, plaque index, decayed surfaces, and with root caries, but diabetes locus of control associated only weakly with adherence with diabetes self-care regimens and not at all with HbA1c level. Correlations between dental locus of control and oral indexes were stronger among those having high value for dental care. Although there were correlations between dental and diabetes locus of control beliefs, only dental locus of control beliefs are practicable for determining health behavior and health status. It is therefore concluded that locus of control beliefs are health behavior specific.
PubMed ID
10480277 View in PubMed
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Reasons preventing regular dental care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73516
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
A M Syrjälä
M L Knuuttila
L K Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):10-4
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Dental Care - psychology
Education
Fees, Dental
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim was to determine what reasons restrict people's daily cleaning of their teeth and yearly attendance for a dental check-up, using as a theoretical background the ideas of Eichholz & Rogers on the rejection of innovation. The series consisted of young and middle-aged persons, 207 women and 183 men, who filled in a questionnaire on the above topics. The questions were phrased so as to cover different reasons for rejecting innovations. Factors analysis revealed the following factors: reasons preventing daily brushing, practical reasons, unpleasant experiences of dental care, laziness, and lack of appreciation. The reliability of the questionnaire was found to be good. Sex showed a significant correlation with reasons preventing daily brushing. Those for whom a long time had elapsed since the last visit to a dentist had more barriers relating to daily brushing, unpleasant experiences and laziness. The more educated the participants were, the fewer barriers they had in relation to the factors appreciation, unpleasant experiences, and daily brushing.
PubMed ID
1547605 View in PubMed
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Self-efficacy as a common variable in oral health behavior and diabetes adherence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47994
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 1999 Apr;107(2):89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
M C Kneckt
A M Syrjälä
P. Laukkanen
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. mkneckt@hotmail.com
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 1999 Apr;107(2):89-96
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - psychology - utilization
Dental Caries - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - psychology - utilization
Abstract
Successful treatment of dental caries, periodontal diseases and diabetes requires persistent daily self-care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of self-efficacy as a common behavioral factor determining oral health behavior, diabetes self-care, and actual health status. Cross-sectional data relating to 149 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients were collected from patient records, and by clinical oral examination and a quantitative questionnaire. The study population was recruited from different locations, and the participation percentage was 80%. Self-efficacy scales associated with corresponding behaviors, and a dental self-efficacy scale also correlated with dental caries. Dental self-efficacy correlated with diabetes self-efficacy, diabetes adherence, and with HbA1c. Also, logistic regression analysis revealed that dental self-efficacy was related to diabetes adherence. Further, those diabetics reporting a high frequency of dental visiting had higher diabetes self-efficacy. As a conclusion, good dental self-efficacy has a positive influence on diabetes adherence. The results suggest that the perception of self-efficacy may be a common behavioral factor determining diabetes self-care and oral health behavior.
PubMed ID
10232456 View in PubMed
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Self-esteem as a characteristic of adherence to diabetes and dental self-care regimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47770
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2001 Feb;28(2):175-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
M C Kneckt
S M Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
M L Knuuttila
A M Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. mkneckt@hotmail.com
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2001 Feb;28(2):175-80
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - psychology
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care - psychology
Self Concept
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND, AIMS: There are biological associations between diabetes control and oral infections. We have also found psychological associations between diabetes self-care and oral health behavior. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether self-esteem can determine diabetes adherence and oral health behavior, both of with require daily, persistent self-care. METHOD: Cross-sectional data on 149 IDDM patients was collected by means of a quantitative self-completed questionnaire. RESULTS: High self-esteem was found to relate to good adherence with exercise regimens (p=0.005) and adjustment of insulin doses (p=0.040). These associations were also found when standardized for socio-demographic variables and HbA1c-level. In the dental sphere, logistic regression analysis showed an association between self-esteem and frequency of tooth brushing. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that self-esteem may be a common psychological factor influencing diabetes and dental self-care. Strengthening patients' self-esteem could help patients to maintain daily self-care.
PubMed ID
11168743 View in PubMed
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