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Main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to the dumping sites of the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste in Stepovogo Fjord, Novaya Zemlya.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276218
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:417-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Aleksander Nikitin
Viacheslav Shershakov
Hilde Elise Heldal
Bjørn Lind
Hans-Christian Teien
Ole Christian Lind
Rajdeep Singh Sidhu
Gunnar Bakke
Alexey Kazennov
Denis Grishin
Anastasia Fedorova
Oxana Blinova
Ingrid Sværen
Penny Lee Liebig
Brit Salbu
Cato Christian Wendell
Elisabeth Strålberg
Nailja Valetova
Galina Petrenko
Ivan Katrich
Igor Logoyda
Iolanda Osvath
Isabelle Levy
Jean Bartocci
Mai Khanh Pham
Adam Sam
Hartmut Nies
Anne Liv Rudjord
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 2:417-26
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Expeditions
Norway
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Russia
Ships
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper reports the main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to investigate the radioecological situation of the Stepovogo Fjord on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya, where the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste was dumped. Based on in situ gamma measurements and the analysis of seawater and sediment samples taken around the submarine, there was no indication of any leakage from the reactor units of K-27. With regard to the radioecological status of Stepovogo Fjord, activity concentrations of all radionuclides in seawater, sediment and biota in 2012 were in general lower than reported from the previous investigations in the 1990s. However in 2012, the activity concentrations of (137)Cs and, to a lesser extent, those of (90)Sr remained elevated in bottom water from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord compared with surface water and the outer part of Stepovogo Fjord. Deviations from expected (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu activity ratios and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in some sediment samples from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord observed in this study and earlier studies may indicate the possibility of leakages from dumped waste from different nuclear sources. Although the current environmental levels of radionuclides in Stepovogo Fjord are not of immediate cause for concern, further monitoring of the situation is warranted.
PubMed ID
25716076 View in PubMed
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Norwegian monitoring (1990-2015) of the marine environment around the sunken nuclear submarine Komsomolets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287929
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Feb;182:52-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Hilde Elise Heldal
Janita K Flo
Ingrid Sværen
Torbjörn Gäfvert
Hallvard Haanes
Lars Føyn
Anne Liv Rudjord
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Feb;182:52-62
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Norway
Radiation monitoring
Seawater - chemistry
Ships
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Norway has monitored the marine environment around the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets since 1990. This study presents an overview of 25 years of Norwegian monitoring data (1990-2015). Komsomolets sank in 1989 at a depth of 1680 m in the Norwegian Sea while carrying two nuclear torpedoes in its armament. Subsequent Soviet and Russian expeditions to Komsomolets have shown that releases from the reactor have occurred and that the submarine has suffered considerable damage to its hulls. Norwegian monitoring detected 134Cs in surface sediments around Komsomolets in 1993 and 1994 and elevated activity concentrations of 137Cs in bottom seawater between 1991 and 1993. Since then and up to 2015, no increased activity concentrations of radionuclides above values typical for the Norwegian Sea have been observed in any environmental sample collected by Norwegian monitoring. In 2013 and 2015, Norwegian monitoring was carried out using an acoustic transponder on the sampling gear that allowed samples to be collected at precise locations, ~20 m from the hull of Komsomolets. The observed 238Pu/239,240Pu activity ratios and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in surface sediments sampled close to Komsomolets in 2013 did not indicate any releases of Pu isotopes from reactor or the torpedo warheads. Rather, these values probably reflect the overprinting of global fallout ratios with fluxes of these Pu isotopes from long-range transport of authorised discharges from nuclear reprocessing facilities in Northern Europe. However, due to the depth at which Komsomolets lies, the collection of seawater and sediment samples in the immediate area around the submarine using traditional sampling techniques from surface vessels is not possible, even with the use of acoustic transponders. Further monitoring is required in order to have a clear understanding of the current status of Komsomolets as a potential source of radioactive contamination to the Norwegian marine environment. Such monitoring should involve the use of ROVs or submersibles in order to obtain samples next to and within the different compartments of the submarine.
PubMed ID
29195122 View in PubMed
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