Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Release of PAHs and heavy metals in coastal environments linked to leisure boats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293446
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Feb; 127:664-671
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Jenny Egardt
Martin Mørk Larsen
Pia Lassen
Ingela Dahllöf
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Carl Skottsbergsgata 22B, 413 19 Göteborg, Sweden. Electronic address: jenny.egardt@bioenv.gu.se.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Feb; 127:664-671
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biofouling - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Leisure Activities
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Seasons
Seawater - chemistry
Ships
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Leisure boats are responsible for elevated levels of heavy metals and PAHs in sediments in- and near marinas and natural harbours. As these compounds are released directly into the water column they also pose a threat to organisms in the pelagic environment. Passive samplers were deployed during peak and post tourist season in the water column of natural harbours, leisure boat waterways and small marinas to measure the dissolved fraction of PAHs and metal ions. Differences between seasons indicative of leisure boat activities were found as PAH composition differed between peak and post season for natural harbours and waterways, where heavier PAHs increased during peak season. During peak season, metal samplers were covered by biofouling, which likely affected the uptake. Post season metal concentrations differ between locations, with concentrations exceeding quality standards at near mainland locations where boats are maintained, compared to the sites in the archipelago.
PubMed ID
29475709 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sediments indicate the continued use of banned antifouling compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293060
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Dec 15; 125(1-2):282-288
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-15-2017
Author
Jenny Egardt
Per Nilsson
Ingela Dahllöf
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Carl Skottsbergsgata 22B, 413 19 Göteborg, Sweden. Electronic address: jenny.egardt@bioenv.gu.se.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Dec 15; 125(1-2):282-288
Date
Dec-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Diuron - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Paint
Ships
Sweden
Triazines - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Antifouling paints are widely used to avoid organisms settling on boat hulls. The active ingredients in the paints have differed over the years where lead, TBT, irgarol and diuron have been deemed too harmful to non-target organisms and subsequently been banned within the EU. Most of these compounds however are persistent in the environment and can cause problems long after they are deposited. We have examined if present-day and banned substances used in antifouling paints can be found in sediments in a national park on the Swedish west coast. Sampled locations include waterways, natural harbours and small marinas for leisure crafts to investigate if number of visiting boats affect the concentration of antifouling compounds in sediments. Few significant differences were found when comparing the different locations types, suggesting that overall boat presence is more important than specific mooring sites, however, several banned antifouling compounds were found in the surface sediments.
PubMed ID
28847633 View in PubMed
Less detail