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Dental erosion: a widespread condition nowadays? A cross-sectional study among a group of adolescents in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267847
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Oct;72(7):523-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Jenny Bogstad Søvik
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Trond Storesund
Aida Mulic
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Oct;72(7):523-9
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Molar - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - education
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Class
Tooth Crown - pathology
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, distribution and severity of erosive wear in a group of 16-18-year-olds in the western part of Norway. A second aim was to describe possible associations between caries experience, socioeconomic background and origin of birth.
Adolescents (n = 795) attending recall examinations at Public Dental Service (PDS) clinics were also examined for dental erosive wear on index surfaces, using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination scoring system (VEDE).
In total, 795 individuals were examined. Dental erosive wear was diagnosed in 59% of the population (44% erosive wear in enamel only, 14% combination of enamel and dentine lesions, 1% erosive wear in dentine only). The palatal surfaces of upper central incisors and occlusal surfaces of first lower molars were affected the most (33% and 48% of all surfaces, respectively). Cuppings on molars were registered in 66% of the individuals with erosive wear. Erosive wear was significantly more prevalent among men (63%) than women (55%) (p = 0.018).
There were no significant associations between dental erosive wear and caries experience, socioeconomic background or origin of birth.
PubMed ID
24432788 View in PubMed
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