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Reliability of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire among Finnish 4-9-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126379
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anne-Mari Borg
Pälvi Kaukonen
Raili Salmelin
Matti Joukamaa
Tuula Tamminen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Department of Child Psychiatry, Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Child, Preschool
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Early recognition of children's mental health problems calls for structured methods in front line services. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a commonly used short questionnaire in screening child's mental difficulties.
To test the reliability and descriptive properties of the SDQ in a community sample of Finnish 4-9-year-old children (n =?4178).
Both parents, two teachers in day-care or a teacher at school completed the SDQ. To control for possible bias, public health nurses rated their concern about every child's mental health, including non-participants.
The internal consistencies of the SDQ total score in all informants' reports were satisfactory to good. Agreement (Spearman rho) in total scores between parents was 0.65, between parent and teacher 0.43 and between two teachers in day-care 0.81. The stability in parent's reports over 12 weeks was good. The distributions of the informant-rated scores indicated significant and clinically important gender differences, and the 80th and 90th percentiles were generally below the international cut-off points. Public health nurses reported emotional or behavioural difficulties more commonly in non-participants (12%) than in participants (7%; p
PubMed ID
22397524 View in PubMed
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Finnish norms for young children on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259119
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):433-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Anne-Mari Borg
Pälvi Kaukonen
Matti Joukamaa
Tuula Tamminen
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):433-42
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Culture
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Early recognition of children's mental health problems is crucial. Although the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a commonly used screening method, further research is needed on its validity and norms for young children.
The aims of the study were to confirm the adjusted lower (normal/borderline) and upper (borderline/abnormal) cut-offs for the SDQ in a Finnish community sample of 4-9-year-old children, and to explore the SDQ's ability to identify the children with mental health problems.
Parents and teachers completed the SDQs (n = 2666). The Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) was administered to parents and teachers of 646 children.
The overall participation rate was 57%. The suggested cut-offs for the SDQ total difficulties scale rated by parents and teachers were 2-5 points lower than the corresponding published British norms. The sensitivity for the total score normal/borderline cut-off (9/10) was 76% in the parent and 66% in the teacher reports and for the borderline/abnormal cut-off (11/12) 90% and 70% respectively. The respective specificity values were 69%, 63%, 74% and 66%. The area under curve (AUC) values of the higher cut-offs were good for parent (0.87) and satisfactory for teacher rated (0.76) total scores. The presence of a DAWBA-rater assigned diagnosis in the abnormal group compared with the normal group was sixfold in the parent and threefold in the teacher reported SDQs.
The suggested cut-offs were clearly lower than the British norms. Yet the properties of the method's discriminative validity were acceptable. Population specific norms, taking into account both the culture and children's age, seem necessary for screening and for international comparisons of the method's validity properties.
PubMed ID
24228779 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in assessing children's mental health in primary care: Finnish parents', teachers' and public health nurses' experiences with the SDQ.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265037
Source
J Child Adolesc Ment Health. 2014;26(3):229-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne-Mari Borg
Raili Salmelin
Pälvi Kaukonen
Matti Joukamaa
Tuula Tamminen
Source
J Child Adolesc Ment Health. 2014;26(3):229-38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Faculty - statistics & numerical data
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Nurses, Public Health - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Primary Health Care - methods
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).
Following the administration of the SDQ in medical check-ups of 4-9 year-old children (n = 2 682) the involved parents, teachers and public health nurses were asked to complete a feedback questionnaire of the SDQ.
Parents took a maximum of 10-15 minutes to complete the SDQ, and only the public health nurses reported that its use was rather burdensome. The SDQ was an age-appropriate method and it was helpful in increasing information and agreement about the child's mental health and need for support. Using the SDQ was a positive experience for parents, but they expected more dialogue with the professionals about the child's situation. The respondents criticised the questionnaire somewhat for being difficult to interpret and complete.
The SDQ was found to be a feasible method for screening children's mental health in primary health care together with parents, teachers and public health nurses. Using the SDQ was a positive experience for parents. However, they reminded the professionals of the importance of sensitive dialogue when assessing the mental health of the child.
PubMed ID
25533409 View in PubMed
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