Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Identifying schizophrenia and other psychoses with psychological scales in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135731
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Apr;199(4):230-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jouko Miettunen
Juha Veijola
Matti Isohanni
Tiina Paunio
Nelson Freimer
Erika Jääskeläinen
Anja Taanila
Jesper Ekelund
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Leena Peltonen
Matti Joukamaa
Dirk Lichtermann
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. jouko.miettunen@oulu.fi
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2011 Apr;199(4):230-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychological Tests
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
We study the predictive power and associations of several psychopathology and temperament scales with respect to schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Measures of psychopathology (Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales, Perceptual Aberration Scale, Hypomanic Personality Scale, Bipolar II Scale, and Schizoidia Scale) and the Temperament and Character Inventory were included in the 31-year follow-up of the prospective Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort (N = 4926). The Perceptual Aberration Scale was the best scale for concurrent validity in psychoses, and also the best psychopathology scale in terms of discriminant validity. Participants scoring high in hypomanic personality were at the highest risk for developing psychosis during the 11-year follow-up. Harm avoidance was a dominant temperament dimension in individuals with psychosis compared with participants without psychiatric diagnoses. These scales are useful as vulnerability markers in studying psychoses.
PubMed ID
21451346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Harmonization Study Between LC-MS/MS and Diasorin RIA for Measurement of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations in a Large Population Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287969
Source
J Clin Lab Anal. 2017 May;31(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Diane J Berry
John Dutton
William D Fraser
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Elina Hyppönen
Source
J Clin Lab Anal. 2017 May;31(3)
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcifediol
Chromatography, Liquid - methods - standards
Cohort Studies
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Radioimmunoassay - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods - standards
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Population-based research on vitamin D has increased dramatically in recent years. Such studies are typically reliant on assay procedures to measure reliable and comparable levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations.
Concentrations of 25(OH)D3 and 25(OH)D2 were measured using LC-MS/MS in 5,915 participants (aged 31?years) of Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Blood samples were assayed in batches over a course of 18?months. As anomalies were present in the measurements, 200 samples were reassayed using Diasorin RIA. Agreement between measurements was assessed by Passing-Bablok regression and limits of agreement (LoA). To harmonize LC-MS/MS with Diasorin RIA measurements, formulae were derived from the LoA.
Concentrations measured by LC-MS/MS were much higher than those measured by Diasorin RIA, with a mean difference of 12.9?ng/ml. Constant variation was evident between batch measurements after log transformation. Statistical formula was applied separately for each batch of LC-MS/MS measurements, enabling us to remove both the constant and proportional bias that was evident prior to the transformation.
Despite the introduction of schemes/programs to improve accuracy of assays to measure 25(OH)D, significant differences can still happen. In these instances, methods to harmonize measurements based on a relatively small number of replicates can be successfully applied to establish confidence and to enable between-study comparisons.
Notes
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1969;193:Suppl 193:1+4911003
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2009 Jan;46(Pt 1):79-8119103962
Cites: J Automat Chem. 1985;7(2):74-918925074
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Dec;92 (12 ):4615-2217726070
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2014 Sep 15;967:195-20225125396
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Aug;91(8):3055-6116720650
Cites: Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006 Sep;92(1):33-816618499
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Nov;140(11):2030S-45S20881084
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Mar;61(3 Suppl):638S-645S7879731
Cites: Anal Chem. 2005 May 1;77(9):3001-715859623
Cites: Stat Med. 2010 Feb 10;29(3):401-1019998394
Cites: Steroids. 2010 Jul;75(7):477-8820188118
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Jul;121(1-2):176-920302938
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1999 Jun;8(2):135-6010501650
Cites: Clin Biochem Rev. 2005 Feb;26(1):33-616278775
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2008 Mar;45(Pt 2):153-918325178
Cites: Clin Chem. 2009 Jul;55(7):1300-219423731
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Aug;121(3-5):565-7320206693
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):507S-510S18689391
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2009 May;46(Pt 3):226-3019389886
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 2012;243:32-4022536760
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Dec;44(6):838-4615520301
Cites: Clin Chem. 2000 Oct;46(10):1657-6111017946
Cites: Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2008 Dec;15(6):489-9418971676
Cites: Clin Chem. 2012 Mar;58(3):543-822247500
Cites: Clin Chem. 1993 Mar;39(3):529-338448871
Cites: Clin Chem. 2005 Jan;51(1):258-6115613728
Cites: Clin Chem. 2005 Sep;51(9):1683-9016020493
Cites: Nature. 1973 Aug 24;244(5417):515-74621128
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2010 Sep;235(9):1034-4520667908
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2006 Jan;43(Pt 1):23-3016390606
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2008 May;391(1-2):6-1218279671
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 2006 Jun;125(6):914-2016690491
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2010 May 1;878(15-16):1163-820381436
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;85(3):860-817344510
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar;103(3-5):480-217197167
PubMed ID
27595769 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 in screening DSM-III-R axis-I disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71351
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(2):119-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha Veijola
Jari Jokelainen
Kristian Läksy
Liisa Kantojärvi
Pirkko Kokkonen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Juha.Veijola@oulu.fi
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(2):119-23
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Simple screening questionnaires for major psychiatric disorders are needed for epidemiological research and clinical work. We describe the characteristics of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) as a screening instrument in a two-phase epidemiological survey using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) as a diagnostic tool. The material consisted of 1609 subjects aged 31 years who were asked to participate in a health survey. The invitation included the HSCL-25 questionnaire. All "screen-positive" (HSCL-25 mean>/=1.55) subjects and every tenth "screen-negative" subject were invited to participate in the SCID interview. The sensitivity of the HSCL-25 for any present DSM-III-R axis-I psychiatric disorder was 48%. The specificity was 87%. The sensitivity of cases with comorbid psychiatric disorders was 100%. The HSCL-25 is a moderate instrument for screening with present axis-I DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders in a young adult population. It can be recommended for screening of psychiatric disorders.
PubMed ID
12745774 View in PubMed
Less detail

False discovery rate estimation for stability selection: application to genome-wide association studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138249
Source
Stat Appl Genet Mol Biol. 2011;10(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ismaïl Ahmed
Anna-Liisa Hartikainen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Sylvia Richardson
Author Affiliation
Inserm.
Source
Stat Appl Genet Mol Biol. 2011;10(1)
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - genetics
Computational Biology - methods
Computer simulation
False Positive Reactions
Finland
Genome, Human
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - analysis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Stability Selection, which combines penalized regression with subsampling, is a promising algorithm to perform variable selection in ultra high dimension. This work is motivated by its evaluation in the context of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). One critical aspect for its use lies in the choice of a decision rule that accounts for the massive number of comparisons realised. The current decision rule relies on the control of the Family Wise Error Rate (FWER) by means of an upper bound derived theoretically. Alternatively, we propose to set the detection threshold according to the more liberal false discovery rate (FDR) criterion. The procedure we propose for its estimation relies on permutations. This procedure is evaluated by simulations according to several scenarios mimicking various correlation structures of genetic data and is compared to the original FWER upper bound. The proposed procedure is shown to be less conservative, and able to pick up more true signals than the FWER upper bound. Finally, the proposed methodology is illustrated on a GWAS analysis of a lipid phenotype (high-density lipoproteins, HDL) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort.
PubMed ID
23089816 View in PubMed
Less detail

GWAS on prolonged gestation (post-term birth): analysis of successive Finnish birth cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293486
Source
J Med Genet. 2018 Jan; 55(1):55-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
William Schierding
Jisha Antony
Ville Karhunen
Marja Vääräsmäki
Steve Franks
Paul Elliott
Eero Kajantie
Sylvain Sebert
Alex Blakemore
Julia A Horsfield
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Justin M O'Sullivan
Wayne S Cutfield
Author Affiliation
University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
Source
J Med Genet. 2018 Jan; 55(1):55-63
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Cohort Studies
Enhancer Elements, Genetic - genetics
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Luciferases - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Pregnancy
Quantitative Trait Loci - genetics
Reproducibility of Results
Term Birth - genetics
Abstract
Gestation is a crucial timepoint in human development. Deviation from a term gestational age correlates with both acute and long-term adverse health effects for the child. Both being born preterm and post-term, that is, having short and long gestational ages, are heritable and influenced by the prenatal and perinatal environment. Despite the obvious heritable component, specific genetic influences underlying differences in gestational age are poorly understood.
We investigated the genetic architecture of gestational age in 9141 individuals, including 1167 born post-term, across two Northern Finland cohorts born in 1966 or 1986.
Here we identify one globally significant intronic genetic variant within the ADAMTS13 gene that is associated with prolonged gestation (p=4.85×10-8). Additional variants that reached suggestive levels of significance were identified within introns at the ARGHAP42 and TKT genes, and in the upstream (5') intergenic regions of the B3GALT5 and SSBP2 genes. The variants near the ADAMTS13, B3GALT5, SSBP2 and TKT loci are linked to alterations in gene expression levels (cis-eQTLs). Luciferase assays confirmed the allele specific enhancer activity for the BGALT5 and TKT loci.
Our findings provide the first evidence of a specific genetic influence associated with prolonged gestation. This study forms a foundation for a better understanding of the genetic and long-term health risks faced by induced and post-term individuals. The long-term risks for induced individuals who have a previously overlooked post-term potential may be a major issue for current health providers.
PubMed ID
29018042 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genome-wide association analysis of metabolic traits in a birth cohort from a founder population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153854
Source
Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):35-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Chiara Sabatti
Susan K Service
Anna-Liisa Hartikainen
Anneli Pouta
Samuli Ripatti
Jae Brodsky
Chris G Jones
Noah A Zaitlen
Teppo Varilo
Marika Kaakinen
Ulla Sovio
Aimo Ruokonen
Jaana Laitinen
Eveliina Jakkula
Lachlan Coin
Clive Hoggart
Andrew Collins
Hannu Turunen
Stacey Gabriel
Paul Elliot
Mark I McCarthy
Mark J Daly
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Nelson B Freimer
Leena Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics and Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.
Source
Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):35-46
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Finland
Founder Effect
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Geography
Humans
Linguistics
Metabolic Networks and Pathways - genetics
Parturition - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - genetics
Quantitative Trait Loci - genetics
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal birth cohorts enable joint investigation of environmental and genetic influences on complex traits. We report GWAS results for nine quantitative metabolic traits (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein, body mass index, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966), drawn from the most genetically isolated Finnish regions. We replicate most previously reported associations for these traits and identify nine new associations, several of which highlight genes with metabolic functions: high-density lipoprotein with NR1H3 (LXRA), low-density lipoprotein with AR and FADS1-FADS2, glucose with MTNR1B, and insulin with PANK1. Two of these new associations emerged after adjustment of results for body mass index. Gene-environment interaction analyses suggested additional associations, which will require validation in larger samples. The currently identified loci, together with quantified environmental exposures, explain little of the trait variation in NFBC1966. The association observed between low-density lipoprotein and an infrequent variant in AR suggests the potential of such a cohort for identifying associations with both common, low-impact and rarer, high-impact quantitative trait loci.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 May;89(5):2114-815126528
Cites: Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2004 Jun;14(3):316-2315172676
Cites: Science. 2004 Aug 6;305(5685):869-7215297675
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1969;193:Suppl 193:1+4911003
Cites: Int J Obes. 1991 Oct;15(10):647-541752725
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Apr 22;328(16):1150-68455681
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Dec;44(6):838-4615520301
Cites: Nat Genet. 2005 Jan;37(1):90-515608637
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 May;90(5):2642-715728197
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-6315889940
Cites: Stat Med. 2005 Oct 15;24(19):2911-3516152135
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Oct 27;353(17):1802-916251536
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2006 Mar;116(3):607-1416511593
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2006 Apr;9(2):205-916611489
Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 May;38(5):556-6016582909
Cites: Diabet Med. 2006 May;23(5):469-8016681555
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2006 Jun 1;15(11):1745-5616670158
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Jun;14 Suppl 3:121S-127S16931493
Cites: Nat Rev Genet. 2006 Oct;7(10):812-2016983377
Cites: J Hypertens. 2007 Feb;25(2):329-4317211240
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Apr;80(4):683-9117357074
Cites: Chem Biol. 2007 Mar;14(3):291-30217379144
Cites: Science. 2007 May 11;316(5826):889-9417434869
Cites: Nature. 2007 Jun 7;447(7145):655-6017554299
Cites: Genet Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;22(1):78-9311754475
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Feb 19;99(4):2228-3311842208
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2003 Apr;24(2):183-21712700179
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):180-9014679384
Cites: J Lipid Res. 2004 Jan;45(1):17-3114523052
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Apr;43(4):825-3114981067
Cites: Nature. 2007 Jun 7;447(7145):661-7817554300
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Sep;81(3):559-7517701901
Cites: Diabetologia. 2007 Oct;50(10):2107-1617694296
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Nov;81(5):1084-9717924348
Cites: Genet Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;32(1):9-1917922480
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Feb;40(2):161-918193043
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Feb;40(2):189-9718193044
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;37(2):280-918267964
Cites: Curr Opin Lipidol. 2008 Apr;19(2):122-718388691
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Apr;82(4):849-5818387595
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Apr;29(8):1049-5618403494
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2008 May;82(5):1185-9218439548
Cites: Science. 2008 May 23;320(5879):1085-818451265
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jun;40(6):768-7518454148
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jun;40(6):695-70118509313
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Nov;199(5):529.e1-529.e1018533124
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):77-8119060907
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):47-5519060911
Comment In: Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):5-619112455
PubMed ID
19060910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of modic changes, Schmorl's nodes, spondylolytic defects, high-intensity zone lesions, disc herniations, and radial tears with low back symptom severity among young Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128809
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2012 Jun 15;37(14):1231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2012
Author
Jani Takatalo
Jaro Karppinen
Jaakko Niinimäki
Simo Taimela
Pertti Mutanen
Roberto Blanco Sequeiros
Simo Näyhä
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Eero Kyllönen
Osmo Tervonen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. janitaka@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2012 Jun 15;37(14):1231-9
Date
Jun-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Geography
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration - complications - diagnosis
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - diagnosis - etiology
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Spine - radiography
Spondylolysis - diagnosis - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study.
We investigated the association among Modic changes, Schmorl's nodes, spondylolytic defects, high-intensity zone lesions, radial tears, herniations, and low back symptom severity.
Disc degeneration is associated with low back pain in early adulthood, but the associations between other MRI findings and low back pain are not well known.
Questionnaire data and MRI scans (1.5-T) were available for 554 subjects derived from a birth cohort at 21 years of age. Data on low back pain and back-related functional limitations at 18, 19, and 21 years of age were used for clustering of subjects, using latent class analysis. We used logistic regression with adjustment for the degree of disc degeneration to evaluate the associations between specific imaging findings and low back symptom severity.
The prevalence of herniations was 20%, Schmorl's nodes 17%, radial tears 9.9%, high-intensity zone lesions 3.2%, spondylolytic defects 5.8%, and Modic changes 0.7%. Latent class analysis produced 5 clusters: "Always Painful" (n = 65) meant painful at all time points and "Recent Onset Pain" (n = 56) meant increasing symptom severity, whereas subjects in the "Moderately Painful" (n = 73), "Minor Pain" (n = 193), and "No Pain" (n = 167) clusters had fewer symptoms. Compared with the "No Pain" cluster, Schmorl's nodes were more likely to occur in the "Always Painful" cluster (P = 0.017) and herniations in the 3 most painful clusters (P
PubMed ID
22166927 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.