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Alcohol withdrawal-induced change in lipoprotein(a): association with the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) axis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10904
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998 Apr;18(4):650-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
M. Paassilta
K. Kervinen
M. Linnaluoto
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland. marita.paassilta@oulu.fi
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998 Apr;18(4):650-4
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - therapy
Body mass index
Ethanol - adverse effects
Human Growth Hormone - urine
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - blood
Abstract
Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Alcohol is one of the few nongenetic factors that lower Lp(a) levels, but the metabolic mechanisms of this action are unknown. Alcohol inhibits the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis. Alcohol might also affect IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), which is an acute inhibitor of IGF-I. We studied how alcohol withdrawal affects Lp(a) levels and the GH/IGF-I/IGFBP-1 axis. Male alcohol abusers (n=27; 20 to 64 years old) were monitored immediately after alcohol withdrawal for 4 days. Twenty-six healthy men, mainly moderate drinkers, served as control subjects. Fasting blood samples were drawn to determine Lp(a), IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 (by ELISA, RIA, and immunoenzymometric assay, respectively). Nocturnal (12 hours) urine collection was performed in 9 alcoholics and 11 control subjects for GH analyses (RIA). The groups were similar in age and body mass index. Lp(a), GH, and IGF-I tended to be lower and IGFBP-1 higher in the alcoholics immediately after alcohol withdrawal than in the control subjects. During the 4-day observation in alcoholics, Lp(a) levels increased by 64% and IGF-I levels by 41%, whereas IGFBP-1 levels decreased by 59% (P
PubMed ID
9555872 View in PubMed
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Could Helicobacter pylori infection increase the risk of coronary heart disease by modifying serum lipid concentrations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52751
Source
Heart. 1996 Jun;75(6):573-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
S. Niemelä
T. Karttunen
T. Korhonen
E. Läärä
R. Karttunen
M. Ikäheimo
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Heart. 1996 Jun;75(6):573-5
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Disease - blood - etiology
Female
Finland
Helicobacter Infections - blood - complications
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: Northern Finland (about 650,000 inhabitants). PATIENTS: 116 patients with angiographically documented CHD and 116 controls matched for age and gender randomly recruited from the register of the Finnish Social Insurance Institute. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The odds ratio (OR) estimates for the association of H pylori infection with CHD. RESULTS: 64% of the CHD patients and 53% of the controls were seropositive for H pylori; the OR adjusted for age and gender was 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9 to 2.5). An additional adjustment for the common risk factors of CHD, including lipid concentrations, in a logistic regression analysis produced an OR estimate of 1.1 (95% CI 0.6 to 2.1). Among the controls, those who were H pylori positive had significantly (P = 0.03) higher concentrations of serum triglycerides than those who were H pylori negative: the trend among the cases was similar, but non-significant. The concentrations of HDL cholesterol tended to be lower in those who were H pylori positive than in those who were H pylori negative, among both the cases and the controls. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of H pylori infection as an independent risk factor for CHD seems to be minor. On the other hand the results are consistent with the hypothesis that H pylori infection might modify the serum lipid concentrations in a way that could increase the risk of CHD.
PubMed ID
8697159 View in PubMed
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DNA polymorphisms at the lipoprotein lipase gene are associated with macroangiopathy in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48388
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1995 May;115(1):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
O. Ukkola
M J Savolainen
P I Salmela
K. von Dickhoff
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1995 May;115(1):99-105
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
DNA Primers
Deoxyribonuclease HindIII
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - enzymology - genetics
Diabetic Angiopathies - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genotype
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Introns
Lipoprotein Lipase - genetics
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prevalence
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We studied the effect of variation at the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene locus on the susceptibility of individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus to atherosclerotic vascular disease in a population of 126 male and 114 female patients. The prevalence of any evidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) (presence of ischaemic ECG changes or definite myocardial infarction) was low in the patients who were homozygous for the presence of the PvuII restriction site (genotype 2-2) (40.9%) compared with those who were heterozygous (genotype 1-2) (57.9%; P = 0.05) or homozygous for the absence of it (genotype 1-1) (61.9%; P
PubMed ID
7669092 View in PubMed
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Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10387
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):230-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
H. Kauma
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Kajaanintie 50 FIN-90220, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):230-8
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Pressure Determination
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - enzymology
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - enzymology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Syndrome
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood - metabolism
von Willebrand Factor - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the associations between serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity (GTP) and the components of the metabolic syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational study of hypertensive patients and controls. SETTING: The participating subjects visited the research laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1045 Caucasians, 40-59 years of age, consisting of 261 drug-treated hypertensive men, 258 drug-treated hypertensive women and 526 age- and sex-matched controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The associations between GTP and the cardiovascular risk factors were analysed through multiple regression and logistic methods and by GTP tertiles. The independent effect of GTP on different insulin measures, calculated from the values of 2 h of oral glucose tolerance test, was estimated after concurrent adjustment for age, obesity and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: GTP correlated highly significantly with the components of the metabolic syndrome. The correlation coefficient were 0.33 between GTP and body mass index, 0. 25 between GTP and systolic blood pressure in control men (P = 0. 0001), 0.39 between GTP and triglycerides, and 0.32 between GTP and fasting insulin in hypertensive women (P = 0.0001). The association between GTP and blood pressure remained significant only at upright measurements in controls. All insulin measures had a significant positive association with increasing GTP tertiles in all the study groups (e.g. fasting insulin 8.1 mU L-1 in the lowest and 11.0 mU L-1in the highest tertile in control women, P = 0.0001), with the exception of fasting insulin in control men. In a pooled logistic analysis after adjustment for age, body mass index, alcohol consumption and gender, the independent predictors of the metabolic syndrome were body mass index, uric acid, total cholesterol and GTP (for log-transformed GTP odds ratio 4.0, 95% CI: 2.80-5.69). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant associations between GTP and the components of the metabolic syndrome. Elevated levels of GTP may not always indicate increased alcohol consumption, but may also suggest the existence of the metabolic syndrome with its subsequent deleterious consequences.
PubMed ID
10971790 View in PubMed
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Hyperinsulinemia and carotid atherosclerosis in hypertensive and control subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67577
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 Jul;21(7):1188-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
A O Rantala
M. Päivänsalo
H. Kauma
M. Lilja
M J Savolainen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 Jul;21(7):1188-93
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arteriosclerosis - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body constitution
Carotid Artery Diseases - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Case-Control Studies
Diastole
Fasting
Female
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - complications - physiopathology
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - complications - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Systole
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationships between carotid atherosclerosis measured as intima-media thickness (IMT) and different measures of insulin in a population-based case-control study of men and women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Carotid ultrasonographic measurements and 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in a random sample of 513 hypertensive subjects, aged 40-59 years, and in 518 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The associations between IMT and the different measures of insulin were analyzed through multiple regression and by insulin quintiles. The independent effect of insulin was estimated after concurrent adjustment for age, obesity, LDL cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS: The most powerful correlates with IMT were LDL cholesterol, age, systolic blood pressure, pack-years of smoking, and of the different insulin parameters, 2-h post-load insulin. In stepwise regression analysis, the independent predictors of the mean IMT were LDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, pack-years of smoking, and age (P
PubMed ID
9653618 View in PubMed
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Myocardial infarction in diabetic and non-diabetic persons with and without prior myocardial infarction: the FINAMI Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172294
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Dec;48(12):2519-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
P. Pajunen
H. Koukkunen
M. Ketonen
T. Jerkkola
P. Immonen-Räihä
P. Kärjä-Koskenkari
K. Kuulasmaa
P. Palomäki
J. Mustonen
A. Lehtonen
M. Arstila
T. Vuorenmaa
S. Lehto
H. Miettinen
J. Torppa
J. Tuomilehto
Y A Kesäniemi
K. Pyörälä
V. Salomaa
Author Affiliation
KTL-National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Dec;48(12):2519-24
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetic Angiopathies - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Recurrence
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
We compared the risk of acute coronary events in diabetic and non-diabetic persons with and without prior myocardial infarction (MI), stratified by age and sex.
A Finnish MI-register study known as FINAMI recorded incident MIs and coronary deaths (n=6988) among people aged 45 to 74 years in four areas of Finland between 1993 and 2002. The population-based FINRISK surveys were used to estimate the numbers of persons with prior diabetes and prior MI in the population.
Persons with diabetes but no prior MI and persons with prior MI but no diabetes had a markedly greater risk of a coronary event than persons without diabetes and without prior MI. The rate of recurrent MI among non-diabetic men with prior MI was higher than the incidence of first MI among diabetic men aged 45 to 54 years. The rate ratio was 2.14 (95% CI 1.40-3.27) among men aged 50. Among elderly men, diabetes conferred a higher risk than prior MI. Diabetic women had a similar risk of suffering a first MI as non-diabetic women with a prior MI had for suffering a recurrent MI.
Both persons with diabetes but no prior MI, and persons with a prior MI but no diabetes are high-risk individuals. Among men, a prior MI conferred a higher risk of a coronary event than diabetes in the 45-54 year age group, but the situation was reversed in the elderly. Among diabetic women, the risk of suffering a first MI was similar to the risk that non-diabetic women with prior MI had of suffering a recurrent MI.
PubMed ID
16247597 View in PubMed
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The negative association between plasma ghrelin and IGF-I is modified by obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47119
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Feb;48(2):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
S M Pöykkö
O. Ukkola
H. Kauma
E. Kellokoski
S. Hörkkö
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. seppo.poykko@ppshp.fi
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Feb;48(2):309-16
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood
Peptide Hormones - blood
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Ghrelin is a natural growth hormone-releasing peptide thought to be involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. The recent studies concerning the association between ghrelin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations have shown either negative correlation or no correlation at all. The aims of this study were to clarify the association between ghrelin and IGF-I concentrations in a large cohort and to characterize whether obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes affect this association. METHODS: We analysed fasting plasma ghrelin and IGF-I concentrations of 1,004 middle-aged subjects of the population-based OPERA study. Insulin resistance was estimated using QUICKI. RESULTS: IGF-I concentrations were negatively associated with ghrelin concentrations in the analysis of all subjects before (beta=-0.32, p
PubMed ID
15688209 View in PubMed
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Sex difference in the regulation of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol by genetic and environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11284
Source
Hum Genet. 1996 Feb;97(2):156-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
H. Kauma
M J Savolainen
R. Heikkilä
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Hum Genet. 1996 Feb;97(2):156-62
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Gene Dosage
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Smoking
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Association between high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and restriction fragment length polymorphisms at the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene locus was studied in a random population-based cohort of 526 Caucasian subjects (259 men, mean age 50.9 years, and 267 women, mean age 51.8 years). HDL cholesterol concentration was adjusted for age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking and plasma triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In females, the HDL cholesterol levels were associated with TaqIB polymorphism (1.46 mmol/l in the B1B1 genotype, 1.56 mmol/l in B1B2 and 1.72 mmol/l in B2B2, P = 0.0001 for the trend). In contrast, this was not observed in men (1.24, 1.20, 1.27 mmol/l, NS). The association was seen even in women who were current smokers (1.41, 1.56, 1.75 mmol/l, n = 72, P = 0.007), but not in male smokers (1.26, 1.19, 1.14 mmol/l, n = 102, NS). In male non-smokers the association was weak (1.22, 1.20, 1.32 mmol/l, n = 157, P = 0.05). In postmenopausal women not receiving hormone replacement therapy (n = 108), the association continued to be present, although weaker (1.50, 1.58, 1.70 mmol/l, P = 0.06). CETP activity (n = 101) tended to be lower in subjects with the B2B2 genotype. In conclusion, a clear-cut sex difference was observed in the genotype effect on plasma HDL cholesterol levels. The slight attenuation of the gene dosage effect after menopause suggests that the gender difference may be, at least in part, due to sex hormones. A genetic subgroup (men with the B2B2 genotype) particularly susceptible to the HDL cholesterol decreasing effect of smoking could be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
8566946 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.