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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies between the assessed urgency and the actual time taken to obtain a consultation with an internist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204936
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Jun;16(2):81-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
A T Vehviläinen
I J Vohlonen
E A Kumpusalo
J K Takala
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Jun;16(2):81-4
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies
Female
Finland
Humans
Internal Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To compare postreferral waiting times to hospital in internal medicine with the urgency of the cases as assessed by a panel of doctors.
Retrospective evaluation of referrals to three hospitals during 1 week.
Referrals to internal medicine departments of Kuopio University Hospital, Kajaani central hospital and Pieksämäki regional hospital in Finland.
Two specialists in internal medicine working in university hospital and four specialists in general practice, two of whom were private sector general practitioners (GPs), the other two being public health centre chief physicians.
Postreferral waiting times, assessment of the urgency of the referral by a panel of doctors, and the reliability of this assessment.
Mean delay to specialist consultation was 36 days. There were no significant differences between the assessors in their opinions regarding the degree of urgency of referrals. Interobserver agreement between assessors was moderate or substantial (kappa values 0.46-0.62) and intraobserver agreement varied from moderate to almost perfect (kappa values were between 0.57 and 0.88). However, of those patients who were assessed to require examination by a consultant within 1 week only 34% actually saw the specialist within that time. Of those patients who were assessed to be require the treatments within 8-30 days, 48% were examined by a specialist within that time.
It is possible to reliably assess the urgency of referrals to internal medicine departments. There is a need to improve the referral process for those patients requiring consultation with a hospital specialist within 30 days.
PubMed ID
9689684 View in PubMed
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IDU perspectives on the design and operation of North America's first medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140462
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Will Small
Liz Ainsworth
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(5):561-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
North America
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Abstract
While the public health benefits of supervised injection facilities (SIFs) have been well documented, there is a lack of research examining the views of injection drug users (IDU) regarding the operation of these facilities. This study used 50 semistructured qualitative interviews to explore IDU perspectives on the design and operation of an SIF in Vancouver, Canada. Although the environment and operation of the SIF are well accepted, long wait times and limited operating hours, as well as regulations that prohibit sharing drugs and assisted injections, pose barriers to using the SIF. Modifying operating procedures and expanding the capacity of the current facility could address these barriers.
PubMed ID
20874006 View in PubMed
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