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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a client care delivery model, Part 2: Variability in client outcomes in community home nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191073
Source
Nurs Econ. 2002 Jan-Feb;20(1):13-21, 36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda-Lee O'Brien-Pallas
Diane Irvine Doran
Michael Murray
Rhonda Cockerill
Souraya Sidani
Brenda Laurie-Shaw
Jacquelyn Lochhaas-Gerlach
Author Affiliation
Nursing Effectiveness, Utilization and Outcomes Research Unit, Home Care Evaluation and Research Center, Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Econ. 2002 Jan-Feb;20(1):13-21, 36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - economics - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care - economics - organization & administration - standards - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Nursing
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Using similar variables, Part II explores variation in client outcomes such as OMAHA knowledge, behavior, and SF-36 scores. Medical and nursing diagnoses explained large variations in client outcomes. Clients cared for by degree-prepared nurses improved knowledge and behavior scores. Unanticipated case complexity was negatively associated with client outcome even with nursing intervention. The study revealed that "for every unit increase in assignment of baccalaureate-prepared nurses, clients will on average demonstrate an 80% greater likelihood of improvement in knowledge scores and a 120% greater likelihood of improvement in behavior scores in relation to their health condition at discharge." This two-part study has offered insight into the controllable variables influencing the cost and quality of home care services.
PubMed ID
11892543 View in PubMed
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A simple on-line information system for quality assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25172
Source
Med Care. 1990 Jul;28(7):567-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
C W Janssen
A. Viste
E. Glück
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Med Care. 1990 Jul;28(7):567-72
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway
Online Systems
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Stomach Neoplasms - complications - surgery
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Thrombophlebitis - epidemiology
Abstract
Many aspects of medicine would be well served by a simple method to assess the outcome of care in specified groups of patients. This study examined charts of patients with stomach cancer on a surgical service. Two digits were added to the ICD-9 number in the routine discharge data; one for the nature and severity of case and the other for the outcome of care. The digits were designed for on-line registration at discharge. Information was also obtained on resource consumption in the various groups of patients. Most of the variables had to be evaluated implicitly as there were no explicit judgement criteria and few empiric data available for comparison. Implicit evaluation of the results was significant and prompted steps for improving care. With current systems, the information obtained from traditional hospital statistics is limited and partly misleading. By slight modification, however, hospital statistics may provide valuable information for assessing quality of care and resource allocation during hospitalization.
PubMed ID
2366598 View in PubMed
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