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Association of ADIPOQ gene variants with body weight, type 2 diabetes and serum adiponectin concentrations: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138003
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2011;12:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Niina Siitonen
Leena Pulkkinen
Jaana Lindström
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Johan G Eriksson
Mika Venojärvi
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. niina.siitonen@uef.fi
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2011;12:5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood - genetics
Adult
Body Weight - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Life Style
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Time Factors
Abstract
Adiponectin, secreted mainly by mature adipocytes, is a protein with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Human adiponectin is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene on the chromosomal locus 3q27. Variations in ADIPOQ are associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and related phenotypes in several populations. Our aim was to study the association of the ADIPOQ variations with body weight, serum adiponectin concentrations and conversion to T2DM in overweight subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, we investigated whether ADIPOQ gene variants modify the effect of lifestyle changes on these traits.
Participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group or a control group. Those whose DNA was available (n = 507) were genotyped for ten ADIPOQ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Associations between SNPs and baseline body weight and serum adiponectin concentrations were analysed using the univariate analysis of variance. The 4-year longitudinal weight data were analysed using linear mixed models analysis and the change in serum adiponectin from baseline to year four was analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test. In addition, the association of SNPs with the risk of developing T2DM during the follow-up of 0-11 (mean 6.34) years was analysed by Cox regression analysis.
rs266729, rs16861205, rs1501299, rs3821799 and rs6773957 associated significantly (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21219602 View in PubMed
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Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189220
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Virpi I Lindi
Matti I J Uusitupa
Jaana Lindström
Anne Louheranta
Johan G Eriksson
Timo T Valle
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Markku Laakso
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. virpi.lindi@uku.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine
Amino Acid Substitution
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body constitution
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Glucose Intolerance - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proline
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - genetics
Regression Analysis
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
The association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPAR-gamma2 gene with the incidence of type 2 diabetes was investigated in 522 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Subjects were randomized to either an intensive diet and exercise group or a control group. By 3 years of intervention, the odds ratio of the development of type 2 diabetes for subjects with the Ala12 allele was 2.11-fold compared with that for subjects with the Pro12Pro genotype (95% CI 1.20-3.72). The risk for type 2 diabetes increased also in subjects who gained weight or belonged to the control group. In the intervention group, subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype lost more weight during the follow-up than subjects with other genotypes (Pro12Pro vs. Ala12Ala P = 0.043), and none of subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype developed type 2 diabetes in this group. In conclusion, the Ala12 allele may predispose to the development of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects with IGT. However, beneficial changes in diet, increases in physical activity, and weight loss may reverse, to some extent, the diabetogenic impact of the Ala12 allele, possibly due to an improved insulin sensitivity.
PubMed ID
12145174 View in PubMed
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Cardiometabolic profile of people screened for high risk of type 2 diabetes in a national diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138828
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Timo Saaristo
Leena Moilanen
Jari Jokelainen
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Mauno Vanhala
Juha Saltevo
Leo Niskanen
Markku Peltonen
Heikki Oksa
Henna Cederberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland. timo.saaristo@pshp.fi
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To study screening of high-risk individuals as part of a national diabetes prevention programme in primary health care settings in Finland between 2003 and 2007, and evaluate the cardiometabolic risk profile of persons identified for intervention.
High-risk individuals were identified by the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), history of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), cardiovascular disease (CVD), or gestational diabetes. Participants subsequently underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. CVD morbidity risk was estimated by the Framingham Study Risk Equation and CVD mortality risk by the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Formula (SCORE).
A high-risk cohort of 10,149 (of whom 30.3% men) was identified (mean age 54.7 for men, 53.0 for women). Altogether 18.8% of men and 11.5% of women had screen-detected diabetes. In total 68.1% of men and 49.4% of women had abnormal glucose tolerance (IFG, IGT or screen-detected diabetes). Furthermore, 43.2% and 41.5% of men, and 13.3% and 11.3% of women, respectively, had a high predicted risk of CVD morbidity or mortality.
Prevalence of dysglycemia including undiagnosed diabetes and the predicted risk for CVD was alarmly high in the identified high-risk cohort, particularly in men.
PubMed ID
21134669 View in PubMed
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Changes in lifestyle modestly reduce the estimated cardiovascular disease risk in one-year follow-up of the Finnish diabetes prevention program (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269353
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Nina Rautio
Jari Jokelainen
Auli Pölönen
Heikki Oksa
Markku Peltonen
Mauno Vanhala
Hannu Puolijoki
Leena Moilanen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Timo Saaristo
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Apr;14(2):145-52
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control - psychology
Diet
Directive Counseling
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess whether changes in self-rated physical activity and diet during a type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention program were associated with changes in estimated 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality in people at high risk for T2D.
Individuals were identified and offered lifestyle counseling as part of the Finnish diabetes prevention program. Ten-year risk for estimated CVD events and mortality were calculated with Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) formula. FRS was available for 774 men and 1474 women and SCORE for 961 men and 1766 women.
During the one-year follow-up, 9.6% of the men reported both an increase in physical activity and improved dietary pattern, 4.1% an increase in physical activity, 39.3% an increase in improved dietary pattern, while 47.0% reported no lifestyle changes. Corresponding numbers for women were 14.2%, 3.8%, 39.2% and 42.7%. Estimated 10-year risk for CVD events decreased 3.5% in men and 1.5% in women reporting an increase in physical activity and improvement in diet, compared to an increase of 0.15% in men (p
PubMed ID
24452452 View in PubMed
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Cognition in the Finnish diabetes prevention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269274
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Jun;108(3):e63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
José A Luchsinger
Jenni Lehtisalo
Jaana Lindström
Tiia Ngandu
Miia Kivipelto
Satu Ahtiluoto
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Johan G Eriksson
Matti Uusitupa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Jun;108(3):e63-6
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Finland
Glucose Intolerance - complications - psychology - therapy
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - prevention & control
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
We studied cognition in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS), a trial of lifestyle intervention that prevented diabetes in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. Cognition was similar in the randomization arms 9 years after the intervention in 364 participants, suggesting that the intervention did not benefit cognition.
PubMed ID
25799080 View in PubMed
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Determinants for the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158954
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 May;31(5):857-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jaana Lindström
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Sirkka Aunola
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Matti Uusitupa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Unit, Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.lindstrom@ktl.fi
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 May;31(5):857-62
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Size
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Intolerance - complications
Heart rate
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Intensive lifestyle intervention significantly reduced diabetes incidence among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. We investigated whether and to what extent risk factors for type 2 diabetes and other baseline characteristics of the study participants modified the effectiveness of the lifestyle intervention.
Overweight, middle-aged volunteers with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to intensive lifestyle intervention (n = 265) or to a control group (n = 257) for a median of 4 years. Diabetes status was ascertained annually with repeated oral glucose tolerance testing. Incidence rates of diabetes and hazard ratios (HRs) comparing the intervention group with the control group were calculated by sex and baseline tertiles of age, BMI, waist circumference, plasma glucose concentration at fasting and 2 h after a glucose load, fasting serum insulin and insulin resistance index, and categories of composite baseline Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC). Interactions between the intervention assignment and baseline risk factors on diabetes risk were analyzed.
The intervention was most effective among the oldest individuals (HRs 0.77, 0.49, and 0.36 by increasing age tertiles, respectively; P(interaction) = 0.0130) and those with a high baseline FINDRISC (HRs 1.09, 0.84, 0.34, and 0.22 by increasing risk score category, respectively; P(interaction) = 0.0400). The effect of the intervention on diabetes risk was not modified by other baseline characteristics or risk factors.
The FINDRISC may be useful in identifying high-risk groups most likely to benefit from intensive lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 2008 Nov;31(11):e87; author reply e8818955714
PubMed ID
18252900 View in PubMed
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Diabetes, glycaemia, and cognition-a secondary analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277076
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Jan;32(1):102-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Jenni Lehtisalo
Jaana Lindström
Tiia Ngandu
Miia Kivipelto
Satu Ahtiluoto
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Johan G Eriksson
Matti Uusitupa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Jose A Luchsinger
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Jan;32(1):102-10
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Progression
Early Termination of Clinical Trials
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - complications - therapy
Patient compliance
Prediabetic State - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Risk factors
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is linked with cognitive dysfunction and dementia in epidemiological studies, but these observations are limited by lack of data on the exact timing of diabetes onset. We investigated diabetes, dysglycaemia, and cognition in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which the timing and duration of diabetes are well documented.
The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study comprised middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance but no diabetes at baseline (n?=?522), randomized to lifestyle intervention or a control group. After an intervention period (mean duration 4 years) and follow-up (additional 9 years), cognitive assessment with the CERAD test battery and Trail Making Test A (TMT) was executed twice within a 2-year interval. Of the 364 (70%) participants with cognitive assessments, 171 (47%) had developed diabetes.
Cognitive function did not differ between those who developed diabetes and those who did not. Lower mean 2-h glucose at an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1C during the intervention period predicted better performance in the TMT (p?=?0.012 and 0.024, respectively). Those without diabetes or with short duration of diabetes improved in CERAD total score between the two assessments (p?=?0.001) whereas those with long duration of diabetes did not (p?=?0.844).
Better glycemic control among persons with baseline impaired glucose tolerance predicted better cognitive performance 9 years later in this secondary analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study population. In addition, learning effects in cognitive testing were not evident in people with long diabetes duration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
26172529 View in PubMed
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Do depressive symptoms have an impact on the effectiveness of lifestyle counseling in prevention of type 2 diabetes? One-year follow-up of FIN-D2D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258014
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Apr;8(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Nina Rautio
Jari Jokelainen
Heikki Oksa
Timo Saaristo
Leena Moilanen
Mauno Vanhala
Markku Peltonen
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Markku Timonen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: nina.rautio@oulu.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Apr;8(1):43-7
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Counseling
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Patient Selection
Primary Health Care
Primary prevention - methods
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To examine whether depressive symptoms are associated with the effectiveness of lifestyle counseling on cardio-metabolic risk profile and glucose homeostasis during one-year follow-up in individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D).
A total of 10,149 individuals took part in the implementation project of the national diabetes prevention program (FIN-D2D) conducted in primary health care setting in Finland. At baseline, altogether 2798 non-diabetic individuals participated in the one-year follow-up, and 2275 of them had at least one group or individual counseling visit.
4.0% of the individuals (n=78) had depressive symptoms, while 96.0% (n=1889) were free of depressive symptoms at baseline. Individuals who had depressive symptoms had higher body mass index and waist circumference at baseline than individuals without depressive symptoms. In terms of changes in cardio-metabolic risk profile and glucose homeostasis the effectiveness of lifestyle counseling was parallel between individuals with and without depressive symptoms during the one-year follow-up.
Effectiveness of lifestyle counseling did not differ between individuals with and without depressive symptoms. Individuals with depressive symptoms should not be excluded from lifestyle intervention programs.
PubMed ID
24238822 View in PubMed
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Educational attainment and effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149759
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009 Oct;86(1):e1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Katja Wikström
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Sirkka Aunola
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Matti Uusitupa
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Jaana Lindström
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Prevention Unit, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. katja.wikstrom@thl.fi
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009 Oct;86(1):e1-5
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We used data from the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study to analyze the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention according to educational attainment. The effect of intervention on lifestyle changes and diabetes incidence was independent of education. The prevention of type 2 diabetes by lifestyle intervention is effective regardless of participants' educational attainment.
PubMed ID
19592125 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.