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Improved data validity in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287189
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186804
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Lisa Martinsson
Per-Anders Heedman
Staffan Lundström
Bertil Axelsson
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186804
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Palliative Care
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC) is a national quality register that collects data about end-of-life care from healthcare providers that care for dying patients. Data are used for quality control and research. Data are mainly collected with an end-of-life questionnaire (ELQ), which is completed by healthcare staff after the death of a patient. A previous validity assessment of the ELQ showed insufficient validity in some items including symptom relief. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of the revised ELQ.
Data from 100 consecutive patients' medical records at two specialised palliative care units were used to complete new ELQs, which were then compared to the ELQ registrations from the SRPC for the same patients. The level of agreement was calculated for each ELQ item. To account for the possibility of the agreement occurring by chance, Cohen's kappa was calculated for suitable items. To examine the extent of registration mistakes when transferring the paper form to the web, the original paper versions of the ELQ filled out at the units were compared to data from the ELQs reported to the SRPC.
Level of agreement between ELQ registrations from the SRPC and the new ELQs based on the medical records varied between 0.55 and 1.00, where 24 items showed level of agreement above 0.80 and 9 items showed level of agreement below 0.80. Cohen's kappa with 95% confidence intervals was calculated for 24 items. The kappa values showed that two items had poor agreement, four fair agreement, 11 moderate agreement, five good agreement and two very good agreement. The level of agreement varied between 0.93 and 1.00 when comparing the ELQ registrations in the SRPC and the paper forms.
The revised ELQ contains more items with high levels of agreement between registrations in the SRPC and notes in the patients' medical records when compared to the previous version. Validating issues around symptom assessment remains a challenge in our model of quality assessment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29049396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is it reliable to use cellular phones for symptom assessment in palliative care? Report on a study in patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98636
Source
J Palliat Med. 2009 Dec;12(12):1087
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009

Validation study of an end-of-life questionnaire from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136308
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Jun;50(5):642-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lisa Martinsson
Per-Anders Heedman
Staffan Lundström
Greger Fransson
Bertil Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Institution of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden. lsaman04@student.umu.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Jun;50(5):642-7
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Quality in health care is important to measure and palliative care is no exception. The Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC) is a national quality register that focuses on the last week of life. It collects data with an end-of-life questionnaire (ELQ), which is validated in this study.
This study included 169 consecutive patients who had died at a palliative unit. That unit had developed a computerized end-of-life medical record module that enabled a comparison between reported data and medical records, illustrating the validity of the registry questionnaire. The paper versions of the ELQs filled in at the unit were also inspected to determine the extent of registration mistakes when completing the web questionnaire.
Data from the medical records and data from the ELQs reported to the SRPC showed a congruity of 22 to 100%. A working limit of acceptable congruity was set to 80%. Eight questions fell below that line. Some of these differences were caused by systematic errors. The paper versions filled in at the unit and the data from the ELQs reported to the SRPC had a congruity of between 96% and 100%, with the exception of one question about pain evaluation, which had 91% congruity.
The results in this study will be used to improve and further develop the register. Some questions need to be more specific to promote more valid registrations. Consensus on quality issues in end-of-life care would simplify the work of writing and answering the questionnaire. It is desirable to perform a similar study at hospital wards that do not specialize in palliative care; however, the anticipated lack of palliative documentation could make such a study difficult to perform.
PubMed ID
21391772 View in PubMed
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Old age as risk indicator for poor end-of-life care quality - a population-based study of cancer deaths from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265892
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2015 Jul;51(10):1331-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Magnus Lindskog
Björn Tavelin
Staffan Lundström
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2015 Jul;51(10):1331-9
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Palliative Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
If patient age affects the quality of end-of-life care in cancer is unknown. Using data from a population-based register of palliative care in Sweden, we addressed this question.
This nation-wide study focused on the last week of life of adults dying from cancer in 2011-2012, based on data reported to a national quality register for end-of-life care (N=26,976). We specifically investigated if age-dependent differences were present with respect to thirteen indicators of palliative care quality. Patients were categorised in one out of five pre-defined age groups. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for type of end-of-life care unit, were calculated using logistic regression, with the oldest group as reference.
Age-dependent differences in implementation rate were detected for ten out of thirteen end-of-life care quality indicators, most of which were progressively less well met with each increment in age group. Compared to elderly cancer patients, young patients were more often informed about imminent death, (OR, 3.9; 95% CI 2.5-5.9, p
PubMed ID
25958036 View in PubMed
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Together we can: experiences from 7 years of cross-sectional studies in a Swedish palliative care clinical research network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98342
Source
Palliat Med. 2010 Apr;24(3):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Staffan Lundström
Eva Gyllenhammar
Ulla Martinsson
Peter Strang
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Services, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation and The Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. staffan.lundstrom@stockholmssjukhem.se
Source
Palliat Med. 2010 Apr;24(3):261-6
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomedical Research - methods - organization & administration - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection - methods
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - therapy
Palliative Care
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
During recent years, research networks and collaboratives focusing on palliative care research have been established both nationally and internationally resulting in several ongoing projects. In 2002, a clinician-based research network, the Palliative Care Research Network in Sweden (PANIS), was established to stimulate research and development of palliative care in Sweden. The growing network, which today includes 60 specialized palliative care units, has used a web-based survey generator to collect data on symptom prevalence, treatment traditions and important issues in palliative care. Eleven different studies involving almost 11,000 patients have been performed within the network including studies on prevalence of antitumoral treatment, the use of opioids, corticosteroids, blood transfusions, parenteral nutrition and prevalence of palliative sedation therapy in specialized palliative care. The working method of the research network is described, and demographic data from 9,298 patients in six cross-sectional studies are presented. Using a relatively simple research methodology, the network has succeeded in addressing key clinical questions and in this article we share experiences and challenges met during the journey.
PubMed ID
20080806 View in PubMed
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A national observational study of the prevalence and use of enteral tube feeding, parenteral nutrition and intravenous glucose in cancer patients enrolled in specialized palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117017
Source
Nutrients. 2013 Jan;5(1):267-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ylva Orrevall
Carol Tishelman
Johan Permert
Staffan Lundström
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. ylva.orrevall@ki.se
Source
Nutrients. 2013 Jan;5(1):267-82
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Enteral Nutrition - statistics & numerical data
Female
Glucose - administration & dosage
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care - methods
Parenteral Nutrition - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of artificial nutrition remains controversial for cancer patients in palliative care, and its prevalence is largely unknown. We therefore conducted a national study to investigate the prevalence, indications for, and perceived benefit of enteral/parenteral nutrition and intravenous glucose in this patient group. A cross-sectional study was performed within the palliative care research network in Sweden (PANIS), using a web-based survey with 24 questions on demographics, prescribed nutritional treatment, estimated survival and benefit from treatment. Data was received from 32 palliative care units throughout the country, representing 1083 patients with gastrointestinal and gynecological malignancies being the most common diagnoses. Thirteen percent of the patients received enteral/parenteral nutrition or intravenous glucose. Parenteral nutrition (PN) was significantly more common in home care units serving the urban Stockholm region (11%) than in other parts of the country (4%). Weight and appetite loss were the predominant indications for PN, with this treatment deemed beneficial for 75% of the palliative patients. Data show that there was great variation in PN use within the country. PN was predominately initiated when patients had weight and appetite loss but still had oral intake, indicating a use of PN that extends beyond the traditional use for patients with obstruction/semi obstruction.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23340317 View in PubMed
Less detail

When nothing helps: propofol as sedative and antiemetic in palliative cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16562
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 Dec;30(6):570-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Staffan Lundström
Ulla Zachrisson
Carl Johan Fürst
Author Affiliation
Palliative Care Services, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 Dec;30(6):570-7
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiemetics - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control
Palliative Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Propofol - administration & dosage
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, and barbiturates are commonly used for sedation to achieve symptom control in end-of-life care. Propofol has several advantages over traditional sedating agents that would indicate its use in treatment-refractory situations. We report on the use of propofol in 35 patients. In 22 patients, propofol was used for palliative sedation when treatment with benzodiazepines had failed. The mean dose range during treatment was between 0.90 and 2.13 mg/kg/h. The effect was assessed as good or very good in 91% of the patients. Thirteen patients were treated with propofol due to intractable nausea and vomiting. The mean dose range during the infusion period was 0.67-1.01 mg/kg/h. The effect was judged as good or very good in 69% of the patients. Based on our experience, we propose clinical guidelines on the safe use of propofol in specialized palliative inpatient units.
PubMed ID
16376744 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.