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Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258830
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Elwalid Nasir
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Independent living
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Smiling - psychology
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Loss - psychology
Work
Abstract
Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated.
In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively.
Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p?
Notes
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Cites: Br Dent J. 2007 Jul 28;203(2):E3; discussion 100-117571092
PubMed ID
24884798 View in PubMed
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Does different wording of a global oral health question provide different results?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268978
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2015 May;73(4):250-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2015 May;73(4):250-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mastication - physiology
Mouth Diseases - psychology
Oral Health
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Self Report
Self-Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Tooth Diseases - psychology
Abstract
Focusing on 70-year-old adults in Sweden and guided by the conceptual framework of International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH), the purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported oral disease and social/psychological/physical oral health outcome variables are associated with two global measures of self-assessed satisfaction with oral health in Swedish 70-year-olds and if there is a degree of discordance between these global questions.
It has become an important task to create a simple way to measure self-perceived oral health. In these attempts to find practical ways to measure health, the 'global oral health question' is a possible tool to measure self-rated oral health, but there is limited knowledge about how important the wording of this question is.
In 2012, a questionnaire was mailed to all persons born in 1942 in two Swedish counties, Örebro (T) and Östergötland (E). The total population of 70-year-olds amounted to 7889. Bivariate analyses were conducted by cross-tabulation and Chi-square statistics. Multivariate analyses were conducted using binary multiple logistic regression.
The two global oral health question of 70-year-olds in Sweden was mainly explained by the number of teeth (OR=5.6 and 5.2), chewing capacity (OR=6.9 and 4.2), satisfaction with dental appearance (OR=19.8 and 17.3) and Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP) (OR=3.5 and 3.9).
Regardless of the wording, it seems that the concept of a global oral health question has the same main determinants.
PubMed ID
23919598 View in PubMed
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Exploring the association of dental care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) - a prospective study of ageing people in Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295514
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2018 Jan; 76(1):21-29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Kristin S Klock
Stein Atle Lie
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2018 Jan; 76(1):21-29
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To explore the association of dental health care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) across time focusing ageing Norwegian and Swedish adults adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need related-factors as defined by Andersen's model.
Data were based on Norwegian and Swedish 1942 birth-cohorts conducted in 2007 (age 65) and 2012 (age 70). In Norway, the response rates ranged from 54% to 58%. Corresponding figures in Sweden were from 72% to 73%. Self-administered questionnaires assessed OIDP, dental care utilization and predisposing, enabling and need related factors. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation was used to adjust for clustering in repeated data.
Significant covariates of OIDP were satisfaction with dental services, dental care avoidance due to financial constraints, frightening experience with dental care during childhood and patient initiated dental visiting. Frequency and regularity of dental attendance were associated with OIDP in the Swedish cohort, only.
In spite of country differences in the public co-financing of dental care, dental care utilization indicators were associated with OIDP across time in both cohorts. Encouraging regular and dentist initiated visiting patterns and strengthening beliefs in keeping own teeth could be useful in attempts to reduce poor oral health related quality of life in ageing people.
PubMed ID
28891363 View in PubMed
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Factor structure of a conceptual model of oral health tested among 65-year olds in Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98051
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;38(2):110-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Anne Nordrehaug Astrøm
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. anne.nordrehaug@cih.uib.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;38(2):110-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Eating
Facial pain
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Oral Health
Principal Component Analysis
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Speech
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: No studies have tested oral health-related quality of life models in dentate older adults across different populations. OBJECTIVES: To test the factor structure of oral health outcomes within Gilbert's conceptual model among 65-year olds in Sweden and Norway. It was hypothesized that responses to 14 observed indicators could be explained by three correlated factors, symptom status, functional limitations and oral disadvantages, that each observed oral health indicator would associate more strongly with the factor it is supposed to measure than with competing factors and that the proposed 3-factor structure would possess satisfactory cross-national stability with 65-year olds in Norway and Sweden. METHODS: In 2007, 6078 Swedish- and 4062 Norwegian adults borne in 1942 completed mailed questionnaires including oral symptoms, functional limitations and the eight item Oral Impacts on Daily Performances inventory. RESULTS: Model generation analysis was restricted to the Norwegian study group and the model achieved was tested without modifications in Swedish 65-year olds. A modified 3-factor solution with cross-loadings, improved the fit to the data compared with a 2-factor- and the initially proposed 3-factor model among the Norwegian [comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97] and Swedish (CFI = 0.98) participants. All factor loadings for the modified 3-factor model were in the expected direction and were statistically significant at CR > 1. Multiple group confirmatory factor analyses, with Norwegian and Swedish data simultaneously revealed acceptable fit for the unconstrained model (CFI = 0.97), whereas unconstrained and constrained models were statistically significant different in nested model comparison. CONCLUSIONS: Within construct validity of Gilbert's model was supported with Norwegian and Swedish 65-year olds, indicating that the 14-item questionnaire reflected three constructs; symptom status, functional limitation and oral disadvantage. Measurement invariance was confirmed at the level of factor structure, suggesting that the 3-factor model is comparable to some extent across 65-year olds in Norway and Sweden.
PubMed ID
20156235 View in PubMed
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Inequality in oral health related to early and later life social conditions: a study of elderly in Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278710
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Feb 10;15:20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2015
Author
Ferda Gülcan
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Stein Atle Lie
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Feb 10;15:20
Date
Feb-10-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Marital status
Norway
Oral Health
Quality of Life
Residence Characteristics
Retirement
Sex Factors
Social Determinants of Health
Social Support
Sweden
Tooth Loss - classification
Abstract
A life course perspective recognizes influences of socially patterned exposures on oral health across the life span. This study assessed the influence of early and later life social conditions on tooth loss and oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) of people aged 65 and 70 years. Whether social inequalities in oral health changed after the usual age of retirement was also examined. In accordance with "the latent effect life course model", it was hypothesized that adverse early-life social conditions increase the risk of subsequent tooth loss and impaired OIDP, independent of later-life social conditions.
Data were obtained from two cohorts studies conducted in Sweden and Norway. The 2007 and 2012 waves of the surveys were used for the present study. Early-life social conditions were measured in terms of gender, education and country of birth, and later-life social conditions were assessed by working status, marital status and size of social network. Logistic regression and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to analyse the data. Inverse probability weighting (IPW) was used to adjust estimates for missing responses and loss to follow-up.
Early-life social conditions contributed to tooth loss and OIDP in each survey year and both countries independent of later-life social conditions. Lower education correlated positively with tooth loss, but did not influence OIDP. Foreign country of birth correlated positively with oral impacts in Sweden only. Later-life social conditions were the strongest predictors of tooth loss and OIDP across survey years and countries. GEE revealed significant interactions between social network and survey year, and between marital status and survey year on tooth loss.
The results confirmed the latent effect life course model in that early and later life social conditions had independent effects on tooth loss and OIDP among the elderly in Norway and Sweden. Between age 65 and 70, inequalities in tooth loss related to marital status declined, and inequalities related to social network increased.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25881160 View in PubMed
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Oral health of 65-year olds in Sweden and Norway: a global question and ICF, the latest conceptual model from WHO.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128013
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2012 Jul;70(4):279-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Gunnar Ekbäck
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Kristin Klock
Sven Ordell
Lennart Unell
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden. gunnar.ekback@orebroll.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2012 Jul;70(4):279-88
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Models, Psychological
Norway
Oral Health - classification
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sickness Impact Profile
Sweden
World Health Organization
Abstract
The aims of this study were to identify explanatory factors of satisfaction with oral health among Norwegian and Swedish 65 year olds in terms of items from four different domains of ICF and to compare the strengths of the various ICF domains in explaining satisfaction with oral health. Further it was to assess whether the explanatory factors of ICF domains vary between Norway and Sweden.
In 2007, standardized questionnaires were mailed to all the residents in certain counties of Sweden and Norway who were born in 1942. Response rates were 73.1% (n = 6078) in Sweden and 56.0% (n = 4062) in Norway.
In total, 33 questions based on four different ICF domains were chosen to explain satisfaction with oral health. Logistic regression showed that four different ICF domains in terms of body function, body structure, activity/participation and environmental factors explained, respectively, 53%, 31%, 12% and 34% of the explanatory variance in the satisfaction with oral health. In the final analysis, only nine items were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
22243522 View in PubMed
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Satisfaction with teeth and life-course predictors: a prospective study of a Swedish 1942 birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98050
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2010 Feb;118(1):66-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Gunnar Ekbäck
Anne Nodrehaug-Astrøm
Kristin Klock
Sven Ordell
Lennart Unell
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. gunnar.ekback@orebroll.se
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2010 Feb;118(1):66-74
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - psychology
Odds Ratio
Oral Health
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - psychology
Tooth Loss - psychology
Toothache - psychology
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the stability or change in satisfaction with teeth among Swedish adults between the ages of 50 and 65 yr, and to identify the impact of socio-demographics and of clinical and subjective oral health indicators on participants' satisfaction with teeth during that period. Self-administered standardized questionnaires were used as part of a longitudinal study. In 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007 all residents (born in 1942) of two Swedish counties were invited to participate in the study. A total of 63% women and 66% men reported being satisfied with their teeth between 50 and 65 yr of age. The corresponding figures, with respect to dissatisfaction, were 7% and 6% respectively. Generalized estimated equation models revealed a decline in the odds of being satisfied with advancing age, which was particularly important in subjects with lower education, tooth loss, and smokers. Consolidation in oral health perceptions starts before age 50, suggesting early intervention before that age. Promotion of a healthy adult lifestyle and improved access to quality oral healthcare might increase the likelihood of people being satisfied with their teeth throughout the third age-period in both genders.
PubMed ID
20156267 View in PubMed
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Self-perceived oral health among 65 and 75 year olds in two Swedish counties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99260
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(2):107-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Katri Ståhlnacke
Lennart Unell
Björn Söderfeldt
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Office, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. katri.stahlnacke@orebroll.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(2):107-19
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate self-perceived oral health in two elderly populations, age's 65 and 75 years, and its relation to background factors, socioeconomic, individual, and dental health service system factors. Another purpose was to investigate if there were any differences in these respects, between the two age groups, born in 1932 or 1942. In two counties in Sweden, Orebro and Ostergötland, all persons born in 1942 have been surveyed by mail every fifth year since 1992. In the year 2007 all persons born in 1932 were also surveyed using the same questionnaire. Those born in 1932 consisted of 3735 persons and those born in 1942 6078 persons. From an outline of a general model of inequalities in oral health data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and contingency tables with chi2 analysis. Multivariable analysis was performed by using multiple regression analysis. Factors related to self-perceived oral health were age group, social network, ethnicity, education, general health,tobacco habits, oral hygiene routines, dental visit habits and cost for care. The self-perceived oral health was overall rather high, especially in view of the studied ages, although it was worse for those of age 75. Socio-economic factors, dental health service system as well as individual lifestyle factors affected self-perceived oral health. To have a satisfying dental appearance, in the aspect of howyou are judged by other people, was important for these age groups. This presents a challenge for dental health planners especially since the proportion of older age groups are growing.
PubMed ID
20701219 View in PubMed
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Self-perceived oral health and obesity among 65 years old in two Swedish counties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137204
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gunnar Ekbäck
Ingmar Näslund
Scott M Montgomery
Sven Ordell
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. gunnar.ekback@orebroll.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):207-15
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the association between oral health and obesity. The study was conducted in the spring of 2007 as a postal survey of all inhabitants born in 1942 and living in the two Swedish counties of Orebro and Ostergötland.This questionnaire survey has been conducted everyfiveyears since 1992 but has been updated continually with additional questions and for the sweep used here, height and weight data were collected. A total of 8,313 individuals received the questionnaire and 6,078 of those responded (73.1%). The outcome variable oral health was measured using one global question and four detailed questions representing different aspects of oral health. The independent variable Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated using self-reported height and weight. A difference in oral health between various BMI groups was found. The difference was both statistically significant and of clinical importance, particularly among the group with severe obesity who reported poorer self-perceived chewing capacity, lower satisfaction with dental appearance, increased mouth dryness and fewer teeth and lower overall satisfaction with oral health. In view of the increased risk of poor oral health demonstrated in this study for those with severe obesity, it may be of value to increase cooperation between dental care and primary health care for these patients.
PubMed ID
21306086 View in PubMed
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What factors can be protective for both self-rated oral health and general health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269035
Source
Swed Dent J. 2015;39(2):99-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Gunnar Ekbäck
Carina Persson
Margareta Lindén-Boström
Source
Swed Dent J. 2015;39(2):99-107
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
Employment
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Retirement
Self Report
Sleep
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze if the same protective factors are significant for both self-rated health and oral health. It was hypothesized that these factors should be the same. The material is based on a population sample of 17 113 women and men aged 18-84 years in one county in central Sweden.The response rate was 61%. The data were collected through a postal questionnaire "Life and Health" in 2008. The questionnaire comprised of 149 questions and was divided into a number of areas, e.g. socioeconomic conditions, quality of life, social relations, lifestyle, and health. To analyze the strength of the protective factors whilst taking into account the relationships between the various independent variables, multivariate analyses were conducted using binary multiple logistic regression. The outcome measures with the strongest association to general health is belonging to the age group 18-34 years, positive faith in the future, good sleeping pattern and to be employed/self-employed/retired. The outcomes with the strongest association to oral health are good finances, belonging to the age group 18-34 years, to be born in Sweden and positive faith in the future. Conclusions. This study shows that, in general, the same protective factors are significant for both self-rated health and self-rated oral health, making it possible to use the same approach to strengthen both general health and oral health. One important outcome, not often considered, is having positive faith in the future. It is a task for the health care system to strengthen people's faith in the future, partly through a very high quality care when needed, but also through active health promotion that increases the chances of a healthy life, both from a public health perspective as from an oral health perspective.
PubMed ID
26529835 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.