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Childhood adversity, adult socioeconomic status and risk of work disability: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285311
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):659-666
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Jaana Pentti
Marianna Virtanen
Jenni Ervasti
Tuula Oksanen
Tea Lallukka
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):659-666
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Disabled Persons - psychology
Employment
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Pensions
Proportional Hazards Models
Retirement
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Social Class
Abstract
To examine the combined effects of childhood adversities and low adult socioeconomic status (SES) on the risk of future work disability.
Included were 34 384 employed Finnish Public Sector study participants who responded to questions about childhood adversities (none vs any adversity, eg, parental divorce or financial difficulties) in 2008, and whose adult SES in 2008 was available. We categorised exposure into four groups: neither (reference), childhood adversity only, low SES only or both. Participants were followed from 2009 until the first period of register-based work disability (sickness absence >9 days or disability pension) due to any cause, musculoskeletal or mental disorders; retirement; death or end of follow-up (December 2011). We ran Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for behavioural, health-related and work-related covariates, and calculated synergy indices for the combined effects.
When compared with those with neither exposure, HR for work disability from any cause was increased among participants with childhood adversity, with low SES, and those with both exposures. The highest hazard was observed in those with both exposures: HR 2.53, 95% CI 2.29?to 2.79 for musculoskeletal disability, 1.55, 95% CI 1.36?to 1.78 for disability due to mental disorders and 1.29, 95% CI 1.20?to 1.39 for disability due to other reasons. The synergy indices did not indicate synergistic effects.
These findings indicate that childhood psychosocial adversity and low adult SES are additive risk factors for work disability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28784838 View in PubMed
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Job strain and the risk of disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders, depression or coronary heart disease: a prospective cohort study of 69,842 employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124519
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Aug;69(8):574-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Anne Mäntyniemi
Tuula Oksanen
Paula Salo
Marianna Virtanen
Noora Sjösten
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Care Unit of Vihti, Federation of Municipalities for Social and Health Services, Ritalantie 4 E 6, 03100 Nummela, Finland. anne.mantyniemi@fimnet.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Aug;69(8):574-81
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Coronary Disease - etiology - psychology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - psychology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pensions
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Observational studies suggest that high job strain is a risk factor for retirement on health grounds, but few studies have analysed specific diagnoses. We examined job strain's association with all-cause and cause-specific disability pensions.
Survey responses to questions about job strain from 48,598 (response rate, 68%) public sector employees in Finland from 2000 to 2002 were used to determine work unit- and occupation-based scores. These job strain scores were assigned to all the 69,842 employees in the same work units or occupations. All participants were linked to the disability pension register of the Finnish Centre of Pensions with no loss to follow-up. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate HRs and their 95% CIs for disability pensions adjusted by demographic, work unit characteristics and baseline health in analyses stratified by sex and socioeconomic position.
During a mean follow-up of 4.6 years, 2572 participants (4%) were granted a disability pension. A one-unit increase in job strain was associated with a 1.3- to 2.4-fold risk of requiring a disability pension due to musculoskeletal diseases in men, women and manual workers, depending on the measure of job strain (work unit or occupation based). The risk of disability pension due to cardiovascular diseases was increased in men with high job strain but not in women nor in any socioeconomic group. No consistent pattern was found for disability pension due to depression.
High job strain is a risk factor for disability pension due to musculoskeletal diseases.
PubMed ID
22573793 View in PubMed
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Organization of nursing care and stressful work characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184721
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):197-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Arja Mäkinen
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Division of Applied Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. arja.makinen@satshp.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):197-205
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Regression Analysis
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Abstract
Occupational stress is assumed to arise from social arrangements that are partially determined by the modes of organization of work. However, there is little systematic research on the extent to which modes of organizing nursing work are related to stressful characteristics of work.
This study explored the relationship between modes of organizing nursing and stress.
Survey responses on modes of organization of nursing were collected from 27 ward sisters and those on stressful work characteristics from 568 nurses working in 27 wards with different nursing modes.
Four different nursing modes (primary, modular, team and functional nursing) were not consistently associated with stress. Statistically significant associations involved only certain features of these modes and specific components of stress. After the effects of demographic and ward characteristics were controlled for, hierarchical regression analyses showed that opportunity to write nursing notes decreased the likelihood of nurses' stress because of problems in interpersonal relationships. Writing nursing notes is common in patient-focused nursing modes (primary and modular nursing). Other features of nursing modes were not associated with stress.
In general, nursing mode is not associated with stressful job characteristics. However, certain aspects of patient-focused nursing reduce the likelihood of interpersonal problems among staff.
PubMed ID
12834378 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial factors and well-being among Finnish GPs and specialists: a 10-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117220
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Apr;70(4):246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Marko Elovainio
Paula Salo
Markus Jokela
Tarja Heponiemi
Anne Linna
Marianna Virtanen
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, Helsinki 271, Finland. marko.elovainio@thl.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Apr;70(4):246-51
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
General practice
Humans
Male
Medicine
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - psychology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Physicians - psychology
Prospective Studies
Reward
Sleep Disorders - etiology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Work - psychology
Abstract
Identifying factors that determine well-being among physicians may help to improve the functioning of hospitals and healthcare centres. We examined associations of psychosocial factors with psychological distress and sleep problems in Finnish general practitioners (GPs) and specialists.
In this prospective cohort study, data from repeated measures over 10 years, related to 886 physicians followed-up from 2000 to 2010 (the Finnish Public Sector Cohort Study). Psychological distress was assessed repeatedly using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, and sleeping problems using the Jenkins scale in three or in four surveys. Psychosocial factors and potential confounders were measured in four surveys over the same period.
High job demands were associated with psychological distress in GPs but not in specialists (p for interaction 0.005). This association was slightly stronger in the within-individual analysis than in the ordinary (total effects) regression, suggesting that the association was not confounded by stable differences between individuals. There was suggestive evidence for a stronger association between effort/reward imbalance and psychological distress in GPs compared with specialists (p for interaction 0.06). High demands and effort-reward-imbalance were associated with elevated sleeping problems in both groups, whereas high job control was associated with lower psychological distress but not sleeping problems.
These findings suggest that work-related psychosocial factors are partly responsible for the rise of health problems in physicians, such as psychological distress and sleeping problems. Increasing job demands may be a health risk, especially in GPs.
PubMed ID
23322916 View in PubMed
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Stressful work environment and wellbeing: What comes first?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272311
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2015 Jul;20(3):289-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Tarja Heponiemi
Markus Jokela
Christian Hakulinen
Justin Presseau
Anna-Mari Aalto
Mika Kivimäki
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2015 Jul;20(3):289-300
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Sleep Wake Disorders - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The association between the psychosocial work environment, including job demands, job control, and organizational justice, and employee wellbeing has been well established. However, the exposure to adverse work environments is typically measured only using self-reported measures that are vulnerable to reporting bias, and thus any associations found may be explained by reverse causality. Using linear regression models and cross-lagged structural equation modeling (SEM), we tested the direction of the association between established job stress models (job demand control and organizational justice models) and 3 wellbeing indicators (psychological distress, sleeping problems, and job satisfaction) among 1524 physicians in a 4-year follow-up. Results from the longitudinal cross-lagged analyses showed that the direction of the association was from low justice to decreasing wellbeing rather than the reverse. Although the pattern was similar in job demands and job control, a reciprocal association was found between job control and psychological distress.
PubMed ID
25705911 View in PubMed
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