Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148666
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Dec;33(12):1419-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
A-M Paradis
G. Godin
L. Pérusse
M-C Vohl
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Laval University, Québec, Canada. marie-claude.vohl@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Dec;33(12):1419-26
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether dietary patterns are associated with obesity phenotypes.
Cross-sectional study.
We recruited 664 participants aged between 18 and 55 years. Dietary data were collected from a food frequency questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed to derive dietary patterns. Body mass index (BMI), weight and waist girth were recorded using standard procedures. Fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by electrical bioimpedance. Obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2) and a positive FHO (FHO+) as having at least one obese first-degree relative.
Two dietary patterns were identified; Western and Prudent. The Western pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of refined grains, French fries, red meats, condiments, processed meats and regular soft drinks whereas the Prudent pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of non-hydrogenated fat, vegetables, eggs and fish and seafood. Subjects in the top tertile of the Western pattern had higher BMI, weight, waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and fat mass than those in the lower tertile. In contrast, subjects in the top tertile of the Prudent pattern had lower BMI, weight, waist girth, fat mass, HDL-cholesterol levels, and lower triglyceride levels than those in the lowest tertile. Individuals in the upper tertile of the Western pattern were more likely to be obese (obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2)) (OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.16-2.87) whereas those in the upper tertile of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96). These latter significant associations were only observed among those with FHO+. No such association was observed among FHO- individuals.
Individuals having a high score of Western pattern were more likely to be obese and those having a high score of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese, and this is particularly among individuals with an FHO+.
PubMed ID
19736556 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contribution of several candidate gene polymorphisms in the determination of adiposity changes: results from the Québec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165171
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jun;31(6):891-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
L. Bouchard
A. Tremblay
C. Bouchard
L. Pérusse
Author Affiliation
Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jun;31(6):891-9
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adiposity
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Skinfold thickness
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Several candidate genes have been associated with obesity, but very few studies have tested more than one gene simultaneously.
In this study, 15 polymorphisms in 10 candidate genes of obesity were tested for association with changes in adiposity measured over a period of 6-10 years in a maximum of 332 adult subjects with a wide range of adiposity (17.5or=40 years).
In the whole sample, the variance in age-related adiposity changes explained by the candidate gene polymorphisms ranged from 3.1% (BMI, P
PubMed ID
17299381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Familial clustering of abdominal visceral fat and total fat mass: the Québec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212039
Source
Obes Res. 1996 May;4(3):253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
T. Rice
L. Pérusse
C. Bouchard
D C Rao
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
Source
Obes Res. 1996 May;4(3):253-61
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Cluster analysis
Family Health
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lipids - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Phenotype
Quebec - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Viscera
Abstract
The evidence for common familial factors underlying total fat mass (estimated from underwater weighing) and abdominal visceral fat (assessed from CT scan) was examined in families participating in phase 2 of the Québec Family Study (QFS) using a bivariate familial correlation model. Previous QFS investigations suggest that both genetic (major and polygenic) and familial environmental factors influence each phenotype, accounting for between 55% to 71% of the phenotypic variance in fat mass, and between 55% to 72% for abdominal visceral fat. The current study suggests that the bivariate familial effect ranges from 29% to 50%. This pattern suggests that there may be common familial determinants for abdominal visceral fat and total fat mass, as well as additional familial factors which are specific to each. The relatively high spouse cross-trait correlations usually suggest that a large percent of the bivariate familial effect may be environmental in origin. However, if mating is not random, then the spouse resemblance may reflect either genetic or environmental causes, depending on the source [i.e., through similar genes or cohabitation (environmental) effects]. Finally, there are significant sex differences in the magnitude of the familial cross-trait correlations involving parents, but not offspring, suggesting complex generation (i.e., age) and sex effects. For example, genes may turn on or off as a function of age and sex, and/or there may be an accumulation over time of effects due to the environment which may vary by sex. Whether the common familial factors are genetic (major and/or polygenic), environmental, or some combination of both, and whether the familial expression depends on sex and/or age warrants further investigation using more complex models.
PubMed ID
8732959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Familial risk of obesity and central adipose tissue distribution in the general Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202054
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 May 15;149(10):933-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1999
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
L. Pérusse
D C Rao
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Physical Activity Sciences Laboratory, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 May 15;149(10):933-42
Date
May-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the familial risk of obesity and of an android profile of fat distribution in the general Canadian population. A sample of 15,245 participants aged 7-69 years from 6,377 households from the Canada Fitness Survey of 1981 was used. The body mass index (BMI), sum of five skinfolds (SF5), ratio of trunk-to-extremity skinfolds, adjusted for SF5, and waist circumference, adjusted for BMI were used as indicators of obesity and central fat distribution. Age- and sex-standardized risk ratios (SRRs) for spouses and first-degree relatives of obese probands indicate that there is significant familial risk for obesity and an android fat distribution in the Canadian population. SRRs for spouses and first-degree relatives of probands exceeding the 99th percentile are 3.01 and 4.96 for BMI, 7.36 and 4.15 for SF5, 1.41 and 3.18 for ratio of trunk-to-extremity skinfolds, adjusted for SF5, and 1.02 and 2.18 for waist circumference, adjusted for BMI, respectively. The SRRs are smaller for less extreme obesity (lower percentile cutoffs) than for more extreme obesity. The SRRs are greater in spouses than in first-degree relatives for SF5; however, the risk for BMI and an android fat distribution was greater among first-degree relatives than among spouses, suggesting a greater role for genetic factors.
PubMed ID
10342802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genome-wide linkage analysis of systolic and diastolic blood pressure: the Québec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196922
Source
Circulation. 2000 Oct 17;102(16):1956-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2000
Author
T. Rice
T. Rankinen
M A Province
Y C Chagnon
L. Pérusse
I B Borecki
C. Bouchard
D C Rao
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. treva@wubios.wustl.edu
Source
Circulation. 2000 Oct 17;102(16):1956-63
Date
Oct-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Blood Pressure - genetics
Body mass index
Chromosome Mapping
Diastole - genetics
Female
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Variation
Genome, Human
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - genetics
Lod Score
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Physical Chromosome Mapping
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Systole - genetics
Abstract
Blood pressure (BP), an important risk factor for coronary heart disease, is a complex trait with multiple genetic etiologies. While some loci affecting BP variation are known (eg, angiotensinogen), there are likely to be novel signals that can be detected with a genome scan approach.
A genome-wide scan was performed in 125 random and 81 obese families participating in the Québec Family Study. A multipoint variance-components linkage analysis of 420 markers (353 microsatellites and 67 restriction fragment length polymorphisms) revealed several signals (P:
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2000 Oct 17;102(16):1877-811034931
PubMed ID
11034945 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parental eating behavior traits are related to offspring BMI in the Québec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116417
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Nov;37(11):1422-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
A R Gallant
A. Tremblay
L. Pérusse
J-P Després
C. Bouchard
V. Drapeau
Author Affiliation
1] Department of Physical Education, Laval University, Québec, Québec, Canada [2] The Quebec Heart and Lung Research Institute, Laval Hospital, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Nov;37(11):1422-6
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Health Behavior
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Parents - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Parental eating behavior traits have been shown to be related to the adiposity of their young children. It is unknown whether this relationship persists in older offspring or whether rigid or flexible control are involved. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that parental eating behavior traits, as measured by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), are related to offspring body weight.
Cross-sectional anthropometric and TFEQ data from phase 2 and 3 of the Québec Family Study generated 192 parent-offspring dyads (offspring age range: 10-37 years). Relationships were adjusted for offspring age, sex and reported physical activity, number of offspring per family and parent body mass index (BMI).
In all parent-offspring dyads, parental rigid control and disinhibition scores were positively related to offspring BMI (r=0.17, P=0.02; r=0.18, P
PubMed ID
23399776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spousal resemblance and risk of 7-year increases in obesity and central adiposity in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200214
Source
Obes Res. 1999 Nov;7(6):545-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
L. Pérusse
D C Rao
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Physical Activity Sciences Laboratory, Laval University Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Obes Res. 1999 Nov;7(6):545-51
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Aged
Body constitution
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Skinfold thickness
Spouses
Abstract
Spousal similarities in 7-year changes in obesity and obesity-related phenotypes were examined in a subsample of 376 pairs of spouses from a sample of 1487 participants in the 1988 Campbell's Survey follow-up of the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey.
Indicators of body fatness included the body mass index (BMI), the sum of five skinfolds (SF5), and waist circumference (WAIST), whereas those for relative adipose tissue (AT) distribution included the ratio of two trunk to three extremity skinfolds, adjusted for SF5 (TERadj), and WAIST adjusted for BMI (WAISTadj).
Spouse correlations were 0.17, 0.17, and 0.17 for the BMI (p
PubMed ID
10574512 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.