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Socio-economic disparities in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and energy-dense foods: the role of motive priorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121990
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):873-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Karri Silventoinen
Satu Männistö
Ari Haukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):873-82
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - economics
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
A low socio-economic status (SES) is related to less healthy dietary habits, but the reasons for this remain unclear. We examined whether the absolute or relative importance of various food choice motives contributed to SES disparities in vegetable/fruit and energy-dense food intake.
We analysed cross-sectional data from the FINRISK Study 2007 by means of structural equation modelling and used a shortened version of the Food Choice Questionnaire to assess the absolute importance of health, pleasure, convenience, price, familiarity and ethicality motives. We calculated the relative importance of each motive by dividing the participant's rating of it by his/her mean score on all motives. Dietary intake was measured with an FFQ.
A population-based survey in Finland.
Men (n 1691) and women (n 2059) aged 25-64 years.
Higher education and income were related to a greater vegetable/fruit intake (ß = 0·12, P
PubMed ID
22857602 View in PubMed
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Folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and methionine intakes and risk of stroke subtypes in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158838
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):954-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2008
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Satu Männistö
Mikko J Virtanen
Jukka Kontto
Demetrius Albanes
Jarmo Virtamo
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):954-61
Date
Apr-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - pharmacology
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Male
Methionine - pharmacology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vitamin B 12 - pharmacology
Vitamin B 6 - pharmacology
Abstract
The associations of dietary folate, vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12), and methionine intakes with risk of stroke subtypes were examined among 26,556 male Finnish smokers, aged 50-69 years, enrolled in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline by using a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 13.6 years, from 1985 through 2004, 2,702 cerebral infarctions, 383 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 196 subarachnoid hemorrhages were identified from national registers. In analyses adjusting for age and cardiovascular risk factors, a high folate intake was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of cerebral infarction but not intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhages. The multivariate relative risk of cerebral infarction was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.91; p(trend) = 0.001) for men in the highest versus lowest quintile of folate intake. Vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12), and methionine intakes were not significantly associated with any subtype of stroke. These findings in men suggest that a high dietary folate intake may reduce the risk of cerebral infarction.
PubMed ID
18270369 View in PubMed
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The positive impact of general vitamin D food fortification policy on vitamin D status in a representative adult Finnish population: evidence from an 11-y follow-up based on standardized 25-hydroxyvitamin D data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284711
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1512-1520
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Tuija Jääskeläinen
Suvi T Itkonen
Annamari Lundqvist
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Tapani Koskela
Kaisa Lakkala
Kirsten G Dowling
George Lj Hull
Heikki Kröger
Jaro Karppinen
Eero Kyllönen
Tommi Härkänen
Kevin D Cashman
Satu Männistö
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1512-1520
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Dietary Supplements
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - chemistry
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - drug therapy - prevention & control
Vitamins - blood - therapeutic use
Abstract
Background: A systematic vitamin D fortification of fluid milk products and fat spreads was started in 2003 in Finland to improve vitamin D status. Objective: We investigated the effects of the vitamin D fortification policy on vitamin D status in Finland between 2000 and 2011.Design: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH)D] concentrations of a nationally representative sample comprising 6134 and 4051 adults aged =30 y from the Health 2000 and Health 2011 surveys, respectively, were standardized according to the Vitamin D Standardization Program with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the change in S-25(OH)D concentrations.Results: Between 2000 and 2011, the mean S-25(OH)D increased from 48 nmol/L (95% CI: 47, 48 nmol/L) to 65 nmol/L (95% CI: 65, 66 nmol/L) (P 50 nmol/L in 2011.Conclusions: The vitamin D status of the Finnish adult population has improved considerably during the time period studied. The increase is mainly explained by food fortification, especially of fluid milk products, and augmented vitamin D supplement use. Other factors, such as the difference in the ultraviolet radiation index between 2000 and 2011, may partly explain the results. When consuming vitamin D sources based on the nutritional recommendations, vitamin D status is sufficient [S-25(OH)D =50 nmol/L], and supplementation is generally not needed.
PubMed ID
28490516 View in PubMed
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Dietary and lifestyle characteristics associated with normal-weight obesity: the National FINRISK 2007 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106164
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Mar 14;111(5):887-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2014
Author
Satu Männistö
Kennet Harald
Jukka Kontto
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Niina E Kaartinen
Suoma E Saarni
Noora Kanerva
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Mar 14;111(5):887-94
Date
Mar-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the lifestyle (leisure-time physical activity, smoking habits and alcohol consumption) and dietary (energy-yielding nutrients, dietary fibre and foods) factors of Finns with a new syndrome called normal-weight obesity (NWO) with those of lean and overweight Finns. The representative population-based study included 4786 participants (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 Study with a health examination and questionnaires. Food intake was assessed using a validated FFQ. NWO was defined to include those with a normal BMI (
PubMed ID
24229475 View in PubMed
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