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Timing of complementary feeding and associations with maternal and infant characteristics: A Norwegian cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299492
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet R Hillesund
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Norwegian Health authorities recommend solid food to be introduced between child age 4-6 months, depending on both the mother´s and infant's needs. The aim of this paper is to describe timing of complementary feeding in a current sample of Norwegian mother/infant-dyads and explore potential associations between timing of introduction to solid foods and a wide range of maternal and infant characteristics known from previous literature to influence early feeding interactions. The paper is based on data from the Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health. In 2016, a total of 715 mothers completed a web-based questionnaire at child age 5.5 months. We found that 5% of the infants were introduced to solid food before 4 months of age, while 14% were not introduced to solid food at 5.5 months of age. Introduction of solid food before 4 months of age was associated with the infant not being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only formula milk at 3 months, the mother being younger, not married/cohabitant, smoking, less educated and having more economic difficulties. Not being introduced to solid food at 5.5 months was associated with the infant being a girl, being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only breastmilk at 3 months, the mother being older, married and having 3 or more children. This study shows that there are still clear socioeconomic differences regarding timing of complementary feeding in Norway. Infants of younger, less educated and smoking mothers are at higher risk of not being fed in compliance with the official infant feeding recommendations. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers for support on healthy feeding practices focusing on the infant`s needs to prevent early onset of social inequalities in health.
PubMed ID
29949644 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of protein is positively associated with percent body fat in middle-aged and older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137784
Source
J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):440-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Kathrine J Vinknes
Stefan de Vogel
Amany K Elshorbagy
Eha Nurk
Christian A Drevon
Clara G Gjesdal
Grethe S Tell
Stein E Vollset
Helga Refsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway. kathrine.vinknes@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):440-6
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adiposity
Aged
Aging
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Proteins - adverse effects
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Data on associations between dietary intake of macronutrients and body composition in the general population are sparse. This population-based, cross-sectional study of 4478 middle-aged (47-49 y) and elderly (71-74 y) men and women from the Hordaland Health Study in western Norway was conducted using a validated FFQ and measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The relation between macronutrient intake [percentage of total energy intake (E%)] and percent body fat was investigated in the total population and in a subgroup with intermediate BMI and stable weight (BMI within the 25th-75th percentile and weight change
PubMed ID
21248195 View in PubMed
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High intake of added sugar among Norwegian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30475
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):285-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Nina C Øverby
Inger T L Lillegaard
Lars Johansson
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutrition Research, University of Oslo, Box 1046, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway. ninaco@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Apr;7(2):285-93
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Exercise - physiology
Female
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Parents - education - psychology
Public Health
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: It is debated whether the intake of added sugar displaces micronutrient-rich foods and dilutes the nutrient density of the diet, and whether there is a link between sugar and the increased rate of obesity. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of added sugar on the intakes of energy, micronutrients, fruit and vegetables, and to examine the association between intake of added sugar and age, sex, body mass index, physical activity, inactivity and parents' education. DESIGN: Participants recorded their food intake in pre-coded food diaries for 4 days and filled in a questionnaire about physical activity, watching television (TV)/using a personal computer (PC) and parents' education. SUBJECTS: Three hundred and ninety-one 4-year-olds, 810 students in the 4th grade (9 years old) and 1005 in the 8th grade (13 years old) were included in the study. RESULTS: The intakes of all nutrients, except alpha-tocopherol among 4-year-olds and vitamin C among 4-year-olds and 4th graders, decreased with increasing content of added sugar in the diet. Moreover, high consumers of added sugar had a 30-40% lower intake of fruit and vegetables than did low consumers. A negative association was observed between consumption of added sugar and body mass index among girls in the 8th grade (P=0.013), whereas a positive association was observed among 4-year-old boys (P=0.055). Associations between physical activity, hours spent watching TV/using a PC, parents' education and the energy intake from added sugar varied in the different age groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed a negative association between the intake of added sugar and intakes of micronutrients, fruit and vegetables. The negative association between sugar intake and intake of fruit and vegetables is important from a public health perspective, since one of the main health messages today is to increase current intake of fruit and vegetables.
PubMed ID
15003136 View in PubMed
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The nutritional strategy: four questions predict morbidity, mortality and health care costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260294
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Aug;33(4):634-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Randi J Tangvik
Grethe S Tell
John A Eisman
Anne Berit Guttormsen
Andreas Henriksen
Roy Miodini Nilsen
Jannike Øyen
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Aug;33(4):634-41
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys - economics
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional care for hospital in-patients is potentially important but challenging.
To investigate the association between nutritional status and clinical outcomes.
Eight prevalence surveys were performed at Haukeland University Hospital, Norway, during 2008-2009. In total 3279 patients were classified as being at nutritional risk or not according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS 2002) tool. The initial four questions of NRS 2002 assess dietary intake, weight loss, body mass index (BMI) and illness severity.
The overall prevalence of nutritional risk was 29%. Adjusted mean days for hospitalisation was 8.3 days for patients at nutritional risk and 5.0 days for patients not at risk (p
PubMed ID
24094814 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Animals
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe changes in consumption of different types of beverages from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy, and to examine associations with maternal age, educational level and BMI.
Cross-sectional design. Participants answered an FFQ at inclusion into a randomized controlled trial, the Fit for Delivery (FFD) trial, in median gestational week 15 (range: 9-20), reporting current consumption and in retrospect how often they drank the different beverages pre-pregnancy.
Eight local antenatal clinics in southern Norway from September 2009 to February 2013.
Five hundred and seventy-five healthy pregnant nulliparous women.
Pre-pregnancy, 27 % reported drinking alcohol at least once weekly, compared with none in early pregnancy (P
PubMed ID
25221910 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
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No increase in risk of hip fracture at high serum retinol concentrations in community-dwelling older Norwegians: the Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269988
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Kristin Holvik
Luai A Ahmed
Siri Forsmo
Clara G Gjesdal
Guri Grimnes
Sven Ove Samuelsen
Berit Schei
Rune Blomhoff
Grethe S Tell
Haakon E Meyer
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Aged
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cod Liver Oil - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Osteoporotic Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Norway has the highest hip fracture rates worldwide and a relatively high vitamin A intake. Increased fracture risk at high intakes and serum concentrations of retinol (s-retinol) have been observed in epidemiologic studies.
We aimed to study the association between s-retinol and hip fracture and whether high s-retinol may counteract a preventive effect of vitamin D.
We conducted the largest prospective analysis of serum retinol and hip fracture to date in 21,774 men and women aged 65-79 y (mean age: 72 y) who attended 4 community-based health studies during 1994-2001. Incident hip fractures occurring up to 10.7 y after baseline were retrieved from electronic hospital discharge registers. Retinol determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection in stored serum was available in 1154 incident hip fracture cases with valid body mass index (BMI) data and in a subcohort defined as a sex-stratified random sample (n = 1418). Cox proportional hazards regression weighted according to the stratified case-cohort design was performed.
There was a modest increased risk of hip fracture in the lowest compared with the middle quintile of s-retinol (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.82) adjusted for sex and study center. The association was attenuated after adjustment for BMI and serum concentrations of a-tocopherol (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.51). We found no increased risk in the upper compared with the middle quintile. No significant interaction between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and s-retinol on hip fracture was observed (P = 0.68).
We found no evidence of an adverse effect of high serum retinol on hip fracture or any interaction between retinol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. If anything, there tended to be an increased risk at low retinol concentrations, which was attenuated after control for confounders. We propose that cod liver oil, a commonly used food supplement in Norway, should not be discouraged as a natural source of vitamin D for fracture prevention.
PubMed ID
26377161 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.