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Daily text messages used as a method for assessing low back pain among workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273547
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;70:45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lage Burström
Håkan Jonsson
Bodil Björ
Ulla Hjalmarsson
Tohr Nilsson
Christina Reuterwall
Jens Wahlström
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;70:45-51
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Text Messaging
Abstract
To evaluate a method for collecting data concerning low back pain (LBP) using daily text messages and to characterize the reported LBP in terms of intensity, variability, and episodes.
We conducted a cohort study of LBP among workers used by a mining company. The participants were asked to answer the question "How much pain have you had in your lower back in the last 24 hours on a scale from 0 to 10, where 0 = no pain and 10 = the worst pain imaginable" once a day for 5 weeks, with this process being repeated 6 months later.
A total of 121 workers participated in the first period of data collection, and 108 participated in the second period. The daily response rate was 93% for both periods, and cluster analysis was shown to be a feasible statistical method for clustering LBP into subgroups of low, medium, and high pain. The daily text messages method also worked well for assessing the episodic nature of LBP.
We have demonstrated a method for repeatedly measuring of LBP using daily text messages. The data permitted clustering into subgroups and could be used to define episodes of LBP.
PubMed ID
26342444 View in PubMed
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Musculoskeletal symptoms and exposure to whole-body vibration among open-pit mine workers in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290389
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-19-2017
Author
Lage Burström
Anna Aminoff
Bodil Björ
Satu Mänttäri
Tohr Nilsson
Hans Pettersson
Hannu Rintamäki
Ingemar Rödin
Victor Shilov
Ljudmila Talykova
Arild Vaktskjold
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine). lage.burstrom@umu.se.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Date
Jun-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Automobile Driving
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Miners
Mining - methods
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
This cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at 4 open-pit mines in Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden as part of the MineHealth project. The aim has been to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms between drivers of mining vehicles and non-drivers.
The mine workers were asked whether they had suffered from any musculoskeletal symptoms during the previous 12 months in specified body regions, and to grade the severity of these symptoms during the past month. They were also asked about their daily driving of mining vehicles.
The questionnaire was completed by 1323 workers (757 vehicle drivers) and the reported prevalence and severity of symptoms were highest for the lower back, followed by pain in the neck, shoulder and upper back. Drivers in the Nordic mines reported fewer symptoms than non-drivers, while for Russian mine workers the results were the opposite of that. The daily driving of mining vehicles had no significant association with the risk of symptoms. Female drivers indicated a higher prevalence of symptoms as compared to male drivers.
The study provided only weak support for the hypothesis that drivers of vehicles reported a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms than non-vehicle drivers. There were marked differences in the prevalence of symptoms among workers in various enterprises, even though the nature of the job tasks was similar. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):553-564.
PubMed ID
28584322 View in PubMed
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Reduced mortality rates in a cohort of long-term underground iron-ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115946
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2013 May;56(5):531-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Ove Björ
Håkan Jonsson
Lena Damber
Jens Wahlström
Tohr Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences (Oncology), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2013 May;56(5):531-40
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alopecia - mortality
Cause of Death
Cerebral Infarction - mortality
Cohort Studies
Cold Temperature
Digestive System Diseases - mortality
Healthy Worker Effect
Humans
Incidence
Iron
Leukoencephalopathies - mortality
Male
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Spinal Diseases - mortality
Stroke - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Historically, working in iron-ore mines has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and silicosis. However, studies on other causes of mortality are inconsistent and in the case of cancer incidence, sparse. The aim of this study was to examine the association between iron-ore mining, mortality and cancer incidence.
A 54-year cohort study on iron-ore miners from mines in northern Sweden was carried out comprising 13,000 workers. Standardized rate ratios were calculated comparing the disease frequency, mortality, and cancer incidence with that of the general population of northern Sweden. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the association between the durations of employment and underground work, and outcome.
Underground mining was associated with a significant decrease in adjusted mortality rate ratios for cerebrovascular and digestive system diseases, and stroke. For several outcomes, elevated standardized rate ratios were observed among blue-collar workers relative to the reference population. However, only the incidence of lung cancer increased with employment time underground (P
PubMed ID
23450695 View in PubMed
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Thermal comfort sustained by cold protective clothing in Arctic open-pit mining-a thermal manikin and questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292690
Source
Ind Health. 2017 Dec 07; 55(6):537-548
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-07-2017
Author
Kirsi Jussila
Sirkka Rissanen
Anna Aminoff
Jens Wahlström
Arild Vaktskjold
Ljudmila Talykova
Jouko Remes
Satu Mänttäri
Hannu Rintamäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
Source
Ind Health. 2017 Dec 07; 55(6):537-548
Date
Dec-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Cold Temperature
Female
Humans
Male
Manikins
Middle Aged
Mining
Protective Clothing
Russia
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wind
Abstract
Workers in the Arctic open-pit mines are exposed to harsh weather conditions. Employers are required to provide protective clothing for workers. This can be the outer layer, but sometimes also inner or middle layers are provided. This study aimed to determine how Arctic open-pit miners protect themselves against cold and the sufficiency, and the selection criteria of the garments. Workers' cold experiences and the clothing in four Arctic open-pit mines in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia were evaluated by a questionnaire (n=1,323). Basic thermal insulation (Icl) of the reported clothing was estimated (ISO 9920). The Icl of clothing from the mines were also measured by thermal manikin (standing/walking) in 0.3 and 4.0 m/s wind. The questionnaire showed that the Icl of the selected clothing was on average 1.2 and 1.5 clo in mild (-5 to +5°C) and dry cold (-20 to -10°C) conditions, respectively. The Icl of the clothing measured by thermal manikin was 1.9-2.3 clo. The results show that the Arctic open-pit miners' selected their clothing based on occupational (time outdoors), environmental (temperature, wind, moisture) and individual factors (cold sensitivity, general health). However, the selected clothing was not sufficient to prevent cooling completely at ambient temperatures below -10°C.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29021416 View in PubMed
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