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Lung cancer and exposure to quartz and diesel exhaust in Swedish iron ore miners with concurrent exposure to radon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143139
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;67(8):513-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Håkan Jonsson
Kåre Eriksson
Lena Damber
Bengt Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingvar.bergdahl@envmed.umu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;67(8):513-8
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Iron - toxicity
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quartz - toxicity
Radon - toxicity
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Studies of underground miners have documented an increased risk of lung cancer mainly linked to radon exposure but possibly influenced by other concurrent exposures.
A cohort study was carried out in 8321 iron ore miners with low exposure to radon, employed in 1923-1998 and followed up for lung cancer in 1958-2000. Historical exposures to radon, crystalline silica and diesel exhaust were assessed. Data including exposure to radon, quartz and diesel exhaust from another mine with higher exposure to radon were reanalysed.
Miners had increased risk for lung cancer (SIR 1.48 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.78), based on 112 cases during 227,000 person-years). The increased risk could not be explained by exposure to radon or diesel exhaust but was associated with exposure to crystalline silica: SIR 0.96 (0.53 to 1.62), 1.45 (1.10 to 1.87), 1.99 (1.31 to 2.90) and 1.77 (0.92 to 3.10) in groups with exposure to 0, 0-2, 2-5 and >5 mg years/m3, respectively. Reanalysis of data from the other mine indicated that quartz was a possible confounder in the analysis of relationship between radon and lung cancer. In the highest radon exposed group, the point estimate for the RR decreased from 5.65 to 3.90 when adjusting for concurrent exposure to quartz.
Crystalline silica, a known carcinogen, probably affects lung cancer risk in iron ore miners. The main implication of the results is for interpretation of the dose-response curve for radon and lung cancer in underground iron ore miners. Since exposure to radon and quartz is often correlated, quartz exposure can be an important confounder.
PubMed ID
20519746 View in PubMed
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Respiratory symptoms and obstructive lung diseases in iron ore miners: report from the obstructive lung disease in northern Sweden studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15111
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(10):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Ulf Hedlund
Bengt Järvholm
Bo Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Occupational medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(10):953-8
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This is a population-based study on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms assessed by a mail questionnaire. The objective was to examine if work in an iron mine increased the risk of airway symptoms or obstructive diseases. The exposed group consisted of 114 previous or current male miners. Referents, 2472 males from the province, had never been employed by the mining company or worked as miners. Age, smoking and a family history of asthma were considered as possible confounders. The miners had an increased risk for respiratory symptoms (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.4-3.1) including recurrent wheeze (OR= 2.4, 95% CI= 1.5-3.9), longstanding cough (OR= 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), and for physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis (OR=2.2, 95% CI= 1.0-4.5). Attacks of shortness of breath and asthma manifestations were similar between miners and referents. Higher risks in miners were found particularly among the non-smokers for physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis (OR=9.2, 95% CI= 3.0-28) and for symptoms as well. A family history of asthma was less common among miners (9.2% vs. 17%, p
PubMed ID
15575354 View in PubMed
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Scientists appeal to Quebec Premier Charest to stop exporting asbestos to the developing world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143585
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;16(2):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tim K Takaro
Devra Davis
Sue Janse Van Rensburg
Ruth Sara Arroyo Aguilar
Eduardo Algranti
John C Bailar
Fiorella Belpoggi
Mathis Berlin
Shelley Bhattacharya
Y V Bonnier Viger
James Brophy
Ray Bustinza
Robert B Cameron
John M Dement
David Egilman
Barry Castleman
Sanjay Chaturvedi
Martin Cherniack
Harlal Choudhury
Paul A Demers
Joseph Digangi
Ana Digon
John G Edwards
Anders Englund
Bjørn Erikson
Heleno Rodrigues Corréa Filho
Giuliano Franco
Arthur L Frank
Alice Freund
David Gee
Antonio Giordano
Michael Gochfeld
Marcel Gilberg
David F Goldsmith
Bernard D Goldstein
Philippe Grandjean
Morris Greenberg
Ivan Gut
Raul Harari
Marc Hindry
Christer Hogstedt
James Huff
Peter F Infante
Bengt Järvholm
David G Kern
Matthew Keifer
Kapil Khatter
Helge Kjuus
Margaret Keith
Linda C Koo
Arun Kumar
Joseph LaDou
Philip J Landrigan
Richard A Lemen
John M Last
Christopher W Lee
James Leigh
Stephen M Levin
Abby Lippman
Guadalupe Aguilar Madrid
Jock McCulloch
Melissa A McDiarmid
James A Merchant
Celeste Monforton
Tim Morse
David C F Muir
Debdas Mukerjee
Karen B Mulloy
J. Myers
Iman Nuwayhid
Peter Orris
David Ozonoff
Domyung Paek
Manomita Patra
Daniela Pelclová
Lew Pepper
Gerald V Poje
Qamar Rahman
Bernardo Reyes
Bruce W S Robinson
Eduardo Rodríguez
Cecile Rose
Kenneth D Rosenman
Linda Rosenstock
Mathuros Ruchirawat
Konrad Rydzynski
Joachim Schneider
Barbara Silverstein
C Eduardo Siqueira
Craig Slatin
Morando Soffritti
Colin Soskoline
Judy Sparer
Leslie Thomas Stayner
Stanislaw Tarkowski
Daniel Thau Teitelbaum
Anna Tompa
Ivancica Trosic
Fernand Turcotte
Rodolfo A G Vilela
Yvonne R K Waterman
Andrew Watterson
David H Wegman
Laura S Welch
Hans-Joachim Woitowitz
Zulmiar Yanri
Cecillia Zavariz
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;16(2):241-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - economics
Asbestosis - prevention & control
Developing Countries
Humans
Mining - economics
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Quebec
Science
PubMed ID
20465068 View in PubMed
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[Serious silicosis still exits in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274642
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Bengt Järvholm
Magnus Svartengren
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Construction Industry
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quartz - adverse effects
Silicosis - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many measures have been taken in Sweden to eliminate the occurrence of serious silicosis. However, between 1997 and 2013 there were 111 deaths with silicosis as underlying cause, 110 men and 1 woman. In most cases the deceased was rather old; only fourteen persons were below 74 years of age. We have studied the exposure between 2007 and 2012 in the 71 persons who died of silicosis as underlying or contributing cause through medical records. We could find information regarding 48 of them. Ten persons worked in mines, 10 in stone industry, 14 with crushing or blasting of rock, 4 in foundries, 3 were concrete workers and 7 suffered exposure in other industries.  The study shows that the measures taken in Sweden have not been sufficient to totally eliminate serious silicosis.
PubMed ID
26625101 View in PubMed
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