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Community-driven alcohol policy in Canada's northern territories 1970-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132957
Source
Health Policy. 2011 Sep;102(1):34-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Colleen M Davison
Catherine S Ford
Paul A Peters
Penelope Hawe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, 1118 Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada. cdavison@uottawa.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2011 Sep;102(1):34-40
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages - history
Health Policy - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Legislation, Food - history
Northern territory
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
To describe community-driven alcohol policy for 78, primarily First Nations, Métis and Inuit, communities in Canada's three northern territories (Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut) between 1970 and 2008. This is a first step to understanding the policy-oriented prevention system that has evolved in these areas over time.
Regulatory data were compiled from Part II of the Territorial Gazette Indices and the Revised Statutes and Regulations of each territory. Regulations were categorized as open, restricted, prohibited or other.
The number of communities with some form of regulation has increased steadily over time with half of the sample communities adopting some form of regulation between 1970 and 2008. The use of prohibition as a policy choice peaked in 1980 but has remained relatively steady since that time. There has been a steady increase in the adoption of other kinds of restrictions. Communities with regulations tend to have smaller and younger populations, a greater percentage of people with First Nations, Métis or Inuit origin and are more geographically isolated than those with no regulation.
This is the first time alcohol control policies have been compiled and described for the Canadian north. The dataset records the collective energies being put into community problem solving and provides a means to interpret the prevalence of health and social problems linked to alcohol use in these communities over time.
PubMed ID
21757249 View in PubMed
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Gluten contamination in the Canadian commercial oat supply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134095
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
T B Koerner
C. Cléroux
C. Poirier
I. Cantin
A. Alimkulov
H. Elamparo
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Terry.Koerner@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Avena sativa - chemistry
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Cereals - chemistry - economics - standards
Diet, Gluten-Free - economics - standards
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food Contamination
Food Hypersensitivity - diet therapy
Food Labeling - standards
Food, Organic - analysis - economics - standards
Glutens - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Legislation, Food
Limit of Detection
Seasons
Seeds - chemistry
Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that a majority of people with celiac disease and on a gluten-free diet can safely consume pure oats in moderate amounts; however, previous studies have indicated that the commercial oat supply in other countries, and in Canada to some extent, is contaminated with other grains. This study has confirmed that the commercial oat supply in Canada is heavily contaminated with gluten from other grains. Approximately 88% of the oat samples (n = 133) were contaminated above 20 mg kg(-1) and there were no differences between the oat types tested. Only one gluten-free variety of oats was analysed and it consistently provided negative results in all analyses. It is difficult to determine where the contamination originates, but there are possibilities for cross-contamination in the field, in the transport of the grain, in the storage of the grain, and in the milling and packaging facilities. It is clear from this study that only those products that have been certified 'pure' oats would be appropriate for a gluten-free diet.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21623493 View in PubMed
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