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Anticholinergic burden and dry mouth among Finnish, community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294919
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Antti Tiisanoja
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Kaija Komulainen
Pasi Lampela
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Unit of Oral Health Sciences Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Poisson Distribution
Saliva - secretion
Xerostomia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to study whether the anticholinergic burden of drugs is related to xerostomia and salivary secretion among community-dwelling elderly people.
Anticholinergic drugs have been shown to be a risk factor for dry mouth, but little is known about the effects of cumulative exposure to anticholinergic drugs measured by anticholinergic burden on salivary secretion or xerostomia.
The study population consisted of 152 community-dwelling, dentate, non-smoking, older people from the Oral Health GeMS study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical examinations. Anticholinergic burden was determined using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). A Poisson regression model with robust error variance was used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI 95%).
Participants with a high-anticholinergic burden (ADS = 3) were more likely to have xerostomia (RR: 3.17; CI: 1.44-6.96), low-unstimulated salivary flow (
PubMed ID
28940566 View in PubMed
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Comparison of predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer's disease - exposure-matched cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283663
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):204
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Dementia, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) being the most common form, is a major hip fracture risk factor, but currently it is not known whether the same factors predict hip fracture among persons with and without dementia/AD. We compared the predictors of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture in persons with and without AD.
An exposure-matched cohort of all community-dwellers of Finland who received a new clinically verified AD diagnosis in 2005-2011 and had no history of previous hip fracture (N = 67,072) and an age, sex, and region-matched cohort of persons without AD (N = 67,072). Associations between sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities and medications and risk of hip fracture and mortality after hip fracture were assessed with Cox regression.
As expected, the incidence of hip fractures in 2005-2012 (2.19/100 person-years vs 0.90/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort), as well as mortality after hip fracture (29/100 person-years vs 23/100 person-years in the non-AD cohort) were higher in the AD cohort. This difference was evident regardless of the risk factors. Mental and behavioural disorders (adjusted hazard ratio; HR 95% confidence interval CI: 1.16, 1.09-1.24 and 1.71, 1.52-1.92 in the AD and non-AD-cohorts), antipsychotics (1.12, 1.04-1.20 and 1.56, 1.38-1.76 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) and antidepressants (1.06, 1.00-1.12 and 1.34 1.22-1.47 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) were related to higher, and estrogen/combination hormone therapy (0.87, 0.77-0.9 and 0.79, 0.64-0.98 for AD and non-AD-cohorts) to lower hip fracture risk in both cohorts. Stroke (1.42, 1.26-1.62), diabetes (1.13, 0.99-1.28), active cancer treatment (1.67, 1.22-2.30), proton pump inhibitors (1.14, 1.05-1.25), antiepileptics (1.27, 1.11-1.46) and opioids (1.10, 1.01-1.19) were associated with higher hip fracture risk in the non-AD cohort. Similarly, the associations between mortality risk factors (age, sex, several comorbidities and medications) were stronger in the non-AD cohort.
AD itself appears to be such a significant risk factor for hip fracture, and mortality after hip fracture, that it overrules or diminishes the effect of other risk factors. Thus, it is important to develop and implement preventive interventions that are suitable and effective in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27908278 View in PubMed
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Duration of new antidepressant use and factors associated with discontinuation among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300475
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Reetta Kettunen
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Marjaana Koponen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study how long antidepressants initiated after diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were used and factors associated with discontinuation of use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, differences in duration of use between the antidepressants groups were compared.
Register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort included 70,718 community-dwelling people with AD who were diagnosed during the years 2005-2011. For this study, the new antidepressant users were included after 1-year washout period (N?=?16,501; 68.6% females, mean age 80.9). The duration of antidepressant use was modeled with the PRE2DUP method. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models and included age, gender, comorbid conditions and concomitant medications.
Median duration of the new antidepressant use period was 309 days (IQR 93-830). For selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use, the median duration was 331 days (IQR 101-829), for mirtazapine 202 days (IQR 52-635), and for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 134 days (IQR 37-522). After 1-year follow-up, 40.8% had discontinued antidepressant use, 54.6% after 2 years and 64.1% after 3 years. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were age over 85, male gender, diabetes, and use of memantine, opioids, and antiepileptics whereas benzodiazepines and related drugs and antipsychotic use were inversely associated with discontinuation.
Antidepressants are used for long-term among people with AD. Need and indication for antidepressant use should be assessed regularly as evidence on their efficacy for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is limited.
PubMed ID
30413841 View in PubMed
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The effect of comprehensive geriatric assessment on anticholinergic exposure assessed by four ranked anticholinergic lists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283602
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Jan - Feb;68:195-201
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pasi Lampela
Heidi Taipale
Piia Lavikainen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Jan - Feb;68:195-201
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Older people often use multiple drugs, and some of them have anticholinergic activity. Anticholinergic drugs may cause adverse reactions, and therefore their use should be limited. To identify anticholinergic load, several ranked lists with different drugs and scoring systems have been developed and used widely in research. We investigated, if a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) decreased the anticholinergic drug score in a 4-year period. We used four different anticholinergic ranked lists to determine the anticholinergic score and to describe how the results differ depending on the list used.
We analyzed data from population-based intervention study, in which a random sample of 1000 persons aged =75 years were randomized to either an intervention group or a control group. Those in the intervention group underwent CGA including medication assessment annually between 2004 and 2007. Current medication use was assessed annually. The anticholinergic load was calculated by using four ranked lists of anticholinergic drugs (Boustani's, Carnahan's, Chew's and Rudolph's) for each person and for each year.
CGA had no statistically significant effect on anticholinergic exposure during the 4-year follow-up, but improvements towards more appropriate medication use were observed especially in the intervention group. However, age, gender and functional comorbidity index were associated to higher anticholinergic exposure, depending on the list used.
Repeated CGAs may result as more appropriate anticholinergic medication use. The selection of the list may affect the results and therefore the selection of the list is important.
PubMed ID
27837709 View in PubMed
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Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
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Hospitalization after Oral Antibiotic Initiation in Finnish Community Dwellers with and without Alzheimer's Disease: Retrospective Register-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301951
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 64(2):437-445
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Heli Järvinen
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 64(2):437-445
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Registries
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are frequently hospitalized from infection-related causes. There are no previous studies investigating hospitalization associated with antibiotic initiation in persons with AD.
To investigate the frequency and risk of hospitalization associated with oral antibiotic initiation among community dwellers with and without AD.
We performed a retrospective register-based study utilizing register-based Medication Use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort. It includes all community dwellers diagnosed with AD during 2005-2011 in Finland and their matched comparison persons without AD. Antibiotic use was initiated by 34,785 persons with and 36,428 without AD. Drug use data were collected from Prescription Register and comorbidities from Special Reimbursement and Hospital Care Registers. Infection diagnoses were collected from the Hospital Care Register. Factors associated with hospitalization were estimated utilizing logistic regression models.
Risk of hospitalization following antibiotic initiation was higher among antibiotic initiators with AD than without AD (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 1.37, 95% Cl 1.28-1.46).Strongest association with hospitalization was found for oral glucocorticoid use, aOR 1.41 (1.25-1.59); epilepsy, aOR 1.33 (1.10-1.63); and active cancer, aOR 1.30 (1.14-1.49). Among initiators of cephalexin, pivmecillinam, amoxicillin/amoxicillin, and enzyme inhibitor and doxycycline, persons with AD were more frequently hospitalized than persons without AD. A quarter of hospitalized antibiotic initiators had infection diagnosis in their hospital care records.
Persons with AD initiating an antibiotic had a higher risk for hospitalization than antibiotic initiators without AD. Further research is needed to determine whether infection-related hospitalization could be reduced.
PubMed ID
29914029 View in PubMed
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Housing adaptations from the perspectives of Swedish occupational therapists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119518
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Katarina Lindberg
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. agneta.malmgren_fange@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Case Management - organization & administration
Data Collection
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Needs Assessment
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration - psychology
Perception
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how occupational therapists in Sweden administer housing adaptation cases, how they perceive the housing adaptation process, and which improvements they consider necessary.
A total of 1 679 occupational therapists employed by the county councils or the local authorities (and involved in housing adaptations) participated in a web-based survey. The survey targeted issues related to referral and needs identification, assessment, certification, case progress feedback, and evaluation.
Less than half of the occupational therapists systematized the assessment prior to intervention and very few conducted any evaluation afterwards. Feedback from workmen or grant managers to the occupational therapists on each case's adaptation progress was often asked for but rarely given. The majority of the participants were satisfied with the housing adaptation process in general, while at the same time they indicated a need for further improvements in the process. Differences between occupational therapists related to employer and year of graduation were found on the majority of the targeted issues.
To conclude, to a very large extent housing adaptations seem to be based on non-standardized procedures for assessment, and only a few of them are evaluated systematically.
PubMed ID
23095046 View in PubMed
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Impact of opioid initiation on antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug use among persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300965
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Aleksi Hamina
Piia Lavikainen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care,University of Eastern Finland,Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 07; 30(7):947-956
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Cognition - drug effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Interrupted Time Series Analysis
Male
Medication Adherence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We analyzed the impact of opioid initiation on the prevalence of antipsychotic and benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
We utilized the register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort for this study. We included all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD during 2010-2011 in Finland initiating opioid use (n = 3,327) and a matched cohort of persons not initiating opioids (n = 3,325). Interrupted time series analyses were conducted to compare the prevalence of antipsychotic and BZDR use in 30-day periods within six months before opioid initiation to 30-day periods six months later.
Before opioid initiation, prevalence of antipsychotic use among opioid initiators was 13.3%, 18.3% at opioid initiation, and 17.3% six months later. Prevalences of BZDR use were 27.1% six months prior, 28.9% at opioid initiation, and 26.9% six months later. After opioid initiation, antipsychotic and BZDR use declined by 0.3 percentage points (pps, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.5) and 0.4 pps (0.2-0.7) per month, respectively, until the end of the follow-up. Compared to persons not initiating opioid use, opioid initiation immediately resulted in an increase in prevalence of 1.9 pps (0.9-2.8) for antipsychotics and of 1.6 pps (0.9-2.2) for BZDR use. However, in total there was a comparative decrease of 0.5 pps (0.3-0.8) per month for antipsychotics and of 0.4 pps (0.2-0.6) for BZDR use until the end of the follow-up.
Our results suggest that opioid initiation may reduce antipsychotic and BZDR use among persons with AD.
PubMed ID
29559009 View in PubMed
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Incidence of antidepressant use in community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease: 13-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295340
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 01; 32(1):94-101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2017
Author
Arto Puranen
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 01; 32(1):94-101
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Depression - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Abstract
The study aimed to investigate the incidence of antidepressant use in persons with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) from 9?years before to 4?years after AD diagnosis and to examine the incidence of different antidepressant groups.
We used register-based data from the Medication use and Alzheimer's disease cohort including all Finnish persons diagnosed with AD in 2005-2011 with their age-matched and gender-matched comparison persons without AD. In this study, 62,104 persons with AD and 62,104 comparison persons were included. Data on dispensed antidepressants during 1995-2012 were collected from the Prescription Register. A 1-year washout period was utilized to measure the rate of new antidepressant users every 6-month period starting from 9?years before and until 4?years after the AD diagnoses. The incidence rate between persons with and without AD was compared with Poisson regression.
The incidence of antidepressant use in persons with AD was higher during the whole study period compared with that in persons without AD. The incidence rate was highest at 6?months after AD diagnosis (incidence rate ratio?=?5.22, 95% confidence interval 4.77-5.72). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were the most frequently initiated group (61.3% of initiations in persons with AD).
The incidence of antidepressant use was higher in persons with AD than in comparison persons, and it was not explained by history of hospital-treated psychiatric disorders. Widespread use of antidepressants in persons with AD is concerning as their efficacy is controversial and their use is associated with adverse events. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
26924266 View in PubMed
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Incidence of Bisphosphonate Use in Relation to Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease in Community-Dwelling Persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294596
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 09; 64(9):e48-9
Publication Type
Letter
Date
09-2016

17 records – page 1 of 2.