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Anticholinergic burden and dry mouth among Finnish, community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294919
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Antti Tiisanoja
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Kaija Komulainen
Pasi Lampela
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Unit of Oral Health Sciences Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gerodontology. 2018 Mar; 35(1):3-10
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Poisson Distribution
Saliva - secretion
Xerostomia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to study whether the anticholinergic burden of drugs is related to xerostomia and salivary secretion among community-dwelling elderly people.
Anticholinergic drugs have been shown to be a risk factor for dry mouth, but little is known about the effects of cumulative exposure to anticholinergic drugs measured by anticholinergic burden on salivary secretion or xerostomia.
The study population consisted of 152 community-dwelling, dentate, non-smoking, older people from the Oral Health GeMS study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical examinations. Anticholinergic burden was determined using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). A Poisson regression model with robust error variance was used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI 95%).
Participants with a high-anticholinergic burden (ADS = 3) were more likely to have xerostomia (RR: 3.17; CI: 1.44-6.96), low-unstimulated salivary flow (
PubMed ID
28940566 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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Persons with Dementia and Their Caregivers Using GPS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281980
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;217:212-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tone Øderud
Bjørg Landmark
Sissel Eriksen
Anne Berit Fossberg
Sigrid Aketun
May Omland
Karl-Gerhard Hem
Elisabeth Østensen
Dag Ausen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;217:212-21
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Caregivers
Data Collection - methods
Dementia
Female
Geographic Information Systems - utilization
Humans
Independent living
Male
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim of the study is to generate knowledge on the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to support autonomy and independence for persons with dementia. By studying a larger cohort of persons with dementia (n=208) and their caregivers, this study provides essential knowledge for planning and implementing GPS technology as a part of public health care services. Commercially available GPS technology was provided to the cohort of 208 persons with dementia from nineteen different Norwegian municipalities. The participants used GPS when performing outdoor activities as part of their daily life during a period of time between 2012 and 2014. Their family caregivers were instructed on how to use the GPS technology for locating the participants. The study documents that using GPS for locating persons with dementia provide increased safety for the person with dementia, their family caregivers and their professional caregivers. Furthermore the results confirm that by using GPS, persons with dementia may maintain their autonomy, enjoy their freedom and continue their outdoor activities despite the progression of the disease. Preconditions for successful implementation are that health professionals are trained to assess the participant's needs, that ethical dilemmas are considered, that caregivers have adequate knowledge about using the technology and that procedures and routines for administrating the GPS and locating persons with dementia are established. Early intervention and close collaboration between persons with dementia, family caregivers and professional caregivers are important for successful implementation of GPS in public health care.
PubMed ID
26294475 View in PubMed
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Sedative load, carious teeth and infection in the periodontium among community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294752
Source
Gerodontology. 2017 Mar; 34(1):13-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Antti Tiisanoja
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Kaija Komulainen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, Center of Oral Health Sciences Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gerodontology. 2017 Mar; 34(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Risk
Abstract
To study the relation of sedative load to carious teeth and periodontal pocketing - indication of infectious periodontal disease - among older people.
This cross-sectional study was based on a subpopulation of 158 community-dwelling, dentate, non-smoking, 75-year-old or older people from the Oral Health Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical oral examinations during 2004-2005. Sedative load was measured by means of the sedative load model, and Poisson multivariate regression models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Participants with a sedative load of either 1-2 (n = 31) or =3 (n = 12) had an increased likelihood of having carious teeth (RR: 1.8, CI: 1.2-2.6 and RR: 2.4, CI: 1.4-4.1, respectively) compared to participants without a sedative load. There was an inverse association between sedative load and the number of teeth with periodontal pockets.
Presence of dental caries was associated with the use of drugs with sedative properties. The use of drugs with sedative properties was not associated with the presence of periodontal pockets.
PubMed ID
26612194 View in PubMed
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