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Attending an activity center: positive experiences of a group of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264606
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Live Aasgaard
Bjørg Landmark
Source
Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1923-31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Participation
Abstract
In Norway, there is a focus on home-dwelling people with dementia receiving the opportunity to participate in organized meaningful activities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of home-dwelling persons with early-stage dementia who attend an activity center and participate in adapted physical and social activities delivered by nurses and volunteers.
The study adopted a qualitative approach, with individual interviews conducted among eight people diagnosed with early-stage dementia. The interview texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis.
Four categories, ie, "appreciated activities", "praised nurses and volunteers", "being more active", and "being included in a fellowship", as well as the overall theme "participation in appreciated activities and a sense of feeling included in a fellowship may have a positive influence on health and well-being" emerged in the analysis. The informants appreciated the adapted physical and social activities and expressed their enjoyment and gratitude. They found the physical activities useful, and they felt themselves to be included in a fellowship through cheerful nurses and volunteers. The nurses were able to create a good atmosphere and spread joy in the center together with the volunteers. The informants felt themselves valued as the persons they were. These findings indicated that such activities may have had a positive influence on the informants' health and well-being.
In order to succeed with this kind of activity center, it is decisive that the nurses are able to tailor meaningful activities and create an environment where the persons with dementia can feel that they are respected and valued. The municipality health care service should implement such activity centers with specialist nurses in dementia care together with volunteers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25419121 View in PubMed
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[Medication use among community-dwelling older Icelanders. Population-based study in urban and rural areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129175
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig Asa Arnadottir
Elín Díanna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
arun@unak.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Dec;97(12):675-80
Date
Dec-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Polypharmacy
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Registries
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe medication use among older community-dwelling Icelanders by collecting information on number of medicine, polypharmacy (>5 medications), and medications by ATC categories. Moreover, to explore the relationship between medication use and various influential factors emphasizing residency in urban and rural areas.
Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants were randomly selected from the National registry in one urban (n=118) and two rural (n=68) areas.
1) = 65 years old, 2) community-dwelling, 3) able to communicate verbally. Information on medication use was obtained from each person's medication list and interviews. A questionnaire and five standardized instruments were used to assess the potential influencing factors.
On average, participants used 3.9 medications and prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. Men used 3.5 medications on average and women 4.4 (p=0.018). Compared to rural residents, urban residents had fewer medical diagnoses, better mobility, less pain, and fewer depressive symptoms. By controlling for the effects of these variables, more medications were associated with urban living (p
PubMed ID
22133526 View in PubMed
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Persons with Dementia and Their Caregivers Using GPS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281980
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;217:212-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tone Øderud
Bjørg Landmark
Sissel Eriksen
Anne Berit Fossberg
Sigrid Aketun
May Omland
Karl-Gerhard Hem
Elisabeth Østensen
Dag Ausen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;217:212-21
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Caregivers
Data Collection - methods
Dementia
Female
Geographic Information Systems - utilization
Humans
Independent living
Male
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Abstract
The aim of the study is to generate knowledge on the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to support autonomy and independence for persons with dementia. By studying a larger cohort of persons with dementia (n=208) and their caregivers, this study provides essential knowledge for planning and implementing GPS technology as a part of public health care services. Commercially available GPS technology was provided to the cohort of 208 persons with dementia from nineteen different Norwegian municipalities. The participants used GPS when performing outdoor activities as part of their daily life during a period of time between 2012 and 2014. Their family caregivers were instructed on how to use the GPS technology for locating the participants. The study documents that using GPS for locating persons with dementia provide increased safety for the person with dementia, their family caregivers and their professional caregivers. Furthermore the results confirm that by using GPS, persons with dementia may maintain their autonomy, enjoy their freedom and continue their outdoor activities despite the progression of the disease. Preconditions for successful implementation are that health professionals are trained to assess the participant's needs, that ethical dilemmas are considered, that caregivers have adequate knowledge about using the technology and that procedures and routines for administrating the GPS and locating persons with dementia are established. Early intervention and close collaboration between persons with dementia, family caregivers and professional caregivers are important for successful implementation of GPS in public health care.
PubMed ID
26294475 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and differences in medication use among older people according to ATC categories and urban-rural residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116344
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Arun K Sigurdardottir
Solveig A Arnadottir
Elin Dianna Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Akureyri, Solborg, Nordurslod, Akureyri, Iceland. arun@unak.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):311-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Pharmaceutical Preparations - classification
Polypharmacy
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study how selected indicators of socioeconomic status and urban-rural residency associate with medication use in form of number of daily medications, polypharmacy, and medication use according to Anatomic Therapeutic Classification (ATC) system.
Cross-sectional, population-based study among older community-dwelling Icelanders. Criteria for participation were: age =65 years, community-dwelling, and able to communicate verbally and to set up a time for a face-to-face interview. Information on medication use was obtained by interviews and by examining each person's medication record. Medications were categorised according to ATC system. A questionnaire and the physical and mental health summary scales of SF-36 Health Survey were used to assess potential influential factors associated with medication use.
On average, participants (n=186) used 3.9 medications, and the prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. No indicators of socioeconomic status had significant association to any aspects of medication use. Compared to urban residents, rural residents had more diagnosed diseases, were less likely to live alone, were less likely to report having adequate income, and had fewer years of education. Controlling for these differences, urban people were more likely to use medication from the B and C categories. Moreover, older urban men, with worse physical health, and greater number of diagnosed diseases used more medications from the B category.
There are unexplained regional differences in medications use, from categories B and C, by older Icelanders. Further studies are needed on why urban residents used equal number of medications, or even more medications, compared to rural residents, despite better socioeconomic status and fewer diagnosed diseases.
PubMed ID
23406652 View in PubMed
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