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Heterogeneity of Characteristics among Housing Adaptation Clients in Sweden--Relationship to Participation and Self-Rated Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275389
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Björg Thordardottir
Carlos Chiatti
Lisa Ekstam
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Jan;13(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Self Report
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the paper was to explore the heterogeneity among housing adaptation clients. Cluster analysis was performed using baseline data from applicants in three Swedish municipalities. The analysis identified six main groups: "adults at risk of disability", "young old with disabilities", "well-functioning older adults", "frail older adults", "frail older with moderate cognitive impairments" and "resilient oldest old". The clusters differed significantly in terms of participation frequency and satisfaction in and outside the home as well as in terms of self-rated health. The identification of clusters in a heterogeneous sample served the purpose of finding groups with different characteristics, including participation and self-rated health which could be used to facilitate targeted home-based interventions. The findings indicate that housing adaptions should take person/environment/activity specific characteristics into consideration so that they may fully serve the purpose of facilitating independent living, as well as enhancing participation and health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729145 View in PubMed
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Housing adaptations from the perspectives of Swedish occupational therapists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119518
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Katarina Lindberg
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. agneta.malmgren_fange@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 May;20(3):228-40
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Case Management - organization & administration
Data Collection
Housing
Humans
Independent living
Needs Assessment
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration - psychology
Perception
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how occupational therapists in Sweden administer housing adaptation cases, how they perceive the housing adaptation process, and which improvements they consider necessary.
A total of 1 679 occupational therapists employed by the county councils or the local authorities (and involved in housing adaptations) participated in a web-based survey. The survey targeted issues related to referral and needs identification, assessment, certification, case progress feedback, and evaluation.
Less than half of the occupational therapists systematized the assessment prior to intervention and very few conducted any evaluation afterwards. Feedback from workmen or grant managers to the occupational therapists on each case's adaptation progress was often asked for but rarely given. The majority of the participants were satisfied with the housing adaptation process in general, while at the same time they indicated a need for further improvements in the process. Differences between occupational therapists related to employer and year of graduation were found on the majority of the targeted issues.
To conclude, to a very large extent housing adaptations seem to be based on non-standardized procedures for assessment, and only a few of them are evaluated systematically.
PubMed ID
23095046 View in PubMed
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