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115 records – page 1 of 12.

Alcohol and coronary heart disease risk--is there an unknown confounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173661
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kari Poikolainen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Anne Linna
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. kari.poikolainen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether confounding by several known or suspected coronary heart disease risk factors are likely to explain the lower coronary heart disease risk among light alcohol drinkers compared with never-drinkers.
A population-based cross-sectional study.
Hypertension, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, depression, sleep disturbances, smoking, physical activity, life satisfaction, psychological distress, trait anxiety, independent and dependent life events, length of working hours, job control, job strain and effort-reward imbalance were compared between never-drinkers and light drinkers (
PubMed ID
16042645 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and sickness absence: a curvilinear relation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187885
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Nov 15;156(10):969-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2002
Author
Jussi Vahtera
Kari Poikolainen
Mika Kivimäki
Leena Ala-Mursula
Jaana Pentti
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku, Finland. jussi.vahtera@ttl.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Nov 15;156(10):969-76
Date
Nov-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Little is known about the U-shaped relation between alcohol intake and health beyond findings related to cardiovascular disease. Medically certified sickness absence is a health indicator in which coronary heart disease is only a minor factor. To investigate the relation between alcohol intake and sickness absence, records regarding medically certified sick leaves from all causes were assessed for 4 years (1997-2000) in a cohort of 1,490 male and 4,952 female municipal employees in Finland. Hierarchical Poisson regression, adjusted for self-reported behavioral and biologic risk factors, psychosocial risk factors, and cardiovascular diseases, was used to estimate the rate ratios and their 95% confidence intervals, relating sickness absence to each level of alcohol consumption. For both men and women, a significant curvilinear trend was found between level of average weekly alcohol consumption and sickness absence. The rates of medically certified sickness absence were 1.2-fold higher (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.3) for never, former, and heavy drinkers compared with light drinkers. The U-shaped relation between alcohol intake and health is not likely to be explained by confounding due to psychosocial differences or inclusion of former drinkers in the nondrinkers category. Moderate alcohol consumption also may reduce health problems other than cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
12419770 View in PubMed
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Allocation of rehabilitation measures provided by the Social Insurance Institution in Finland: a register linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163871
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Apr;39(3):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Heikki Suoyrjö
Katariina Hinkka
Mika Kivimäki
Timo Klaukka
Jaana Pentti
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Petrea, Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Turku. heikki.suoyrjo@petrea.fi
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Apr;39(3):198-204
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Social Security - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study the allocation of rehabilitation measures provided by the Finnish Social Insurance Institution in relation to the characteristics and health status of rehabilitants.
A register linkage study.
A total of 67,106 full-time local government employees with a minimum of 10-month job contracts in 10 Finnish towns during the period 1994-2002.
Data on the rehabilitation granted between 1994 and 2002, special medication reimbursements for chronic diseases, and disability retirement, were derived from the registers of the Social Insurance Institution as an indicator of chronic morbidity and linked to the employers' records on demographic characteristics and rates of sickness absence.
In comparison with non-rehabilitants, the rate of sickness absence (> 21 days) was 2.2-2.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-3.0) higher, the odds ratios of special medication reimbursement 1.5-6.1-fold (95% CI 1.3-6.9) higher and disability retirement 3.1-7.5-fold (95% CI 2.7-9.3) higher among rehabilitants. Older women and employees in manual or lower-grade non-manual jobs predominated in the rehabilitation groups. The proportion of temporary employees receiving rehabilitation was low.
Permanently employed older women with an excess burden of health problems predominate in the receipt of rehabilitation provided by the Social Insurance Institution.
PubMed ID
17468787 View in PubMed
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Association of age at menarche with cardiovascular risk factors, vascular structure, and function in adulthood: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156794
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1876-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Debbie A Lawlor
George Davey Smith
Marko Elovainio
Markus Jokela
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Jussi Vahtera
Leena Taittonen
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. m.kivimaki@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1876-82
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Body Height
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstruation
Multivariate Analysis
Overweight - complications
Risk factors
Abstract
It is unclear whether age at menarche is an independent determinant of future cardiovascular risk.
We aimed to determine whether menarcheal age is an independent predictor of body mass index (BMI) and a wide range of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescence and adulthood.
We examined the associations of menarcheal age with BMI (in kg/m(2)) and other cardiovascular risk factors in adolescence and adulthood in a population-based sample of 794 female adolescents aged 9-18 y at baseline. Their age at first menstruation was requested at baseline and again 3 and 6 y later. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed at baseline and at age 30-39 y.
A 1-y decrease in menarcheal age was associated with 0.81 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.08) higher adult BMI as well as greater waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio, elevated systolic blood pressure, higher insulin resistance, and greater risk of metabolic syndrome (P
PubMed ID
18541580 View in PubMed
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The association of distress and sleeping problems with physicians' intentions to change profession: the moderating effect of job control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147879
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Anne Kouvonen
Jukka Vänskä
Hannu Halila
Timo Sinervo
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The present study examined whether job control moderated the association between stress indicators (distress and sleeping problems) and intentions to change profession among 2,650 Finnish physicians. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was applied. The authors found that high levels of distress and sleeping problems were associated with higher levels of intentions to change profession, whereas high job control was associated with lower levels of intentions to change profession even after adjusting for the effects of gender, age, and employment sector. In addition, high job control was able to mitigate the positive association that distress and sleeping problems had with intentions to change profession. Our findings highlight the importance of offering more job control to physicians to prevent unnecessary physician turnover.
PubMed ID
19839657 View in PubMed
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The association of social support at work and in private life with mental health and antidepressant use: the Health 2000 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155538
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Marjo Sinokki
Katariina Hinkka
Kirsi Ahola
Seppo Koskinen
Mika Kivimäki
Teija Honkonen
Pauli Puukka
Timo Klaukka
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lemminkäisenkatu 14-18 B, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. marjo.sinokki@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Social support is assumed to protect mental health, but it is not known whether low social support at work increases the risk of common mental disorders or antidepressant medication. This study, carried out in Finland 2000-2003, examined the associations of low social support at work and in private life with DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders and subsequent antidepressant medication.
Social support was measured with self-assessment scales in a cohort of 3429 employees from a population-based health survey. A 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which encompasses operationalized criteria for DSM-IV diagnoses and allows the estimation of DSM-IV diagnoses for major mental disorders. Purchases of antidepressants in a 3-year follow-up were collected from the nationwide pharmaceutical register of the Social Insurance Institution.
Low social support at work and in private life was associated with a 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders (adjusted odds ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.48-2.82 for supervisory support, 1.65, 95% CI 1.05-2.59 for colleague support, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.12-2.36 for private life support). Work-related social support was also associated with subsequent antidepressant use.
This study used a cross-sectional analysis of DSM-IV mental disorders. The use of purchases of antidepressant as an indicator of depressive and anxiety disorders can result in an underestimation of the actual mental disorders.
Low social support, both at work and in private life, is associated with DSM-IV mental disorders, and low social support at work is also a risk factor for mental disorders treated with antidepressant medication.
PubMed ID
18722019 View in PubMed
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Associations of social support and sex life--the HeSSup Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174347
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Jul;58(1):71-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Ansa Ojanlatva
Päivi Rautava
Hans Helenius
Katariina Korkeila
Jari Sundell
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Juha Mäkinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Teacher Education, Sanitas 3rd Floor, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, 20014 University of Turku, Finland. ansa.ojanlatva@utu.fi
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Jul;58(1):71-81
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Female
Finland
Friends
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Support
Spouses
Abstract
The present study characterized the associations of three sex life issues (importance of, satisfaction with, and ease in talking about sex life) with social support and reciprocity. We utilised survey data of working-aged men and women (n = 21,101) from the population-based random sample of the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) Study (40% response). The respondents with abundant social support considered sex life important, were satisfied with it, and found it easy to talk about sex life more often than those with less social support. Social support in sex life offered by one's own spouse/partner was important particularly to women, not available from the other sources to the same extent. Friends functioned as significant positive sources of support in sex life particularly among women, but relatives did not. Mutual reciprocity was associated with favourable perceptions of sex life. Persons lacking established primary social support should have easy access to services.
PubMed ID
15950839 View in PubMed
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Average household income, crime, and smoking behaviour in a local area: the Finnish 10-Town study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164963
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1904-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Anne Kouvonen
Marko Elovainio
Anne Linna
Tuula Oksanen
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Work and Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, Helsinki FIN 00250, Finland. marianna.virtanen@ttl.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1904-13
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Crime
Data Collection
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
Social environments, like neighbourhoods, are increasingly recognised as determinants of health. While several studies have reported an association of low neighbourhood socio-economic status with morbidity, mortality and health risk behaviour, little is known of the health effects of neighbourhood crime rates. Using the ongoing 10-Town study in Finland, we examined the relations of average household income and crime rate measured at the local area level, with smoking status and intensity by linking census data of local area characteristics from 181 postal zip codes to survey responses to smoking behaviour in a cohort of 23,008 municipal employees. Gender-stratified multilevel analyses adjusted for age and individual occupational status revealed an association between low local area income rate and current smoking. High local area crime rate was also associated with current smoking. Both local area characteristics were strongly associated with smoking intensity. Among ever-smokers, being an ex-smoker was less likely among residents in areas with low average household income and a high crime rate. In the fully adjusted model, the association between local area income and smoking behaviour among women was substantially explained by the area-level crime rate. This study extends our knowledge of potential pathways through which social environmental factors may affect health.
PubMed ID
17324492 View in PubMed
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Body mass index in adolescence and number of children in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161882
Source
Epidemiology. 2007 Sep;18(5):599-606
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Markus Jokela
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Jorma Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2007 Sep;18(5):599-606
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parity
Poisson Distribution
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Body weight is associated with reproduction and related behaviors, but it is unknown whether it has significance for fertility differences in the general population. We examined whether adolescent body mass index (BMI; kg/m) predicted the number of children in adulthood 21 years later.
The participants were 1298 Finnish women and men (ages 12, 15, and 18 years at baseline) followed in a prospective population-based cohort study (the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns) from year 1980 to 2001.
There was an inverted J-shaped association between BMI and the number of children, such that underweight adolescents had 10-16% fewer children in adulthood, overweight adolescents 4-8% fewer, and obese adolescents 32-38% fewer than individuals with normal adolescent weight. This association was similar in women and men, and independent of age, education, urbanicity of residence, and timing of menarche (in women). Adolescents with low or high BMI were less likely to have lived with a partner in adulthood, which partly accounted for their decreased number of children. The influence of adolescent BMI was independent of adulthood BMI in women but not in men. Age at menarche also predicted the number of children, such that women with early or late menarche had more children than those with average age at menarche.
Underweight and especially obesity may have a negative impact on fertility in the general population. The increasing prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents may represent a concern for future reproductive health.
PubMed ID
17700249 View in PubMed
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Change in reciprocity as a predictor of depressive symptoms: a prospective cohort study of Finnish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154649
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1907-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ari Väänänen
Abraham P Buunk
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Centre of Expertise for Work Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. ari.vaananen@ttl.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1907-16
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine gender differences in the association between changes in the balance of give and take in close relationships and depressive symptoms. Data from a 5-year prospective cohort study in Finland (HeSSup Study) (N=18,445) were analyzed. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, recent negative life events, baseline depressive symptoms, hostility, and the supportiveness of social network, a shift of balance toward support receiving was a significant risk factor for future depressive symptoms among women. In contrast, men whose balance of give and take had moved toward support giving had a higher risk of future depressive symptoms than other men. When the analyses were replicated in a sub-cohort of initially non-depressed participants who lived in reciprocal relationships and had no recent life events, the results became even more pronounced among women, although not among men. We conclude that, for women, a shift in their close relationships toward support receiving may lead to increased risk of depressive symptoms, whereas for men a shift toward giving may have a parallel though less evident impact.
PubMed ID
18930340 View in PubMed
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115 records – page 1 of 12.