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Accuracy of the ICD-10 discharge diagnosis for syncope.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119178
Source
Europace. 2013 Apr;15(4):595-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Martin Huth Ruwald
Morten Lock Hansen
Morten Lamberts
Søren Lund Kristensen
Mads Wissenberg
Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen
Stefan Bisgaard Christensen
Michael Vinther
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Jim Hansen
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. mruwald@hotmail.com
Source
Europace. 2013 Apr;15(4):595-600
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Syncope - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Administrative discharge codes are widely used in epidemiology, but the specificity and sensitivity of this coding is unknown and must be validated. We assessed the validity of the discharge diagnosis of syncope in administrative registers and reviewed the etiology of syncope after workup.
Two samples were investigated. One sample consisted of 5262 randomly selected medical patients. The other sample consisted of 750 patients admitted or seen in the emergency department (ED) for syncope (ICD-10: R55.9) in three hospitals in Denmark. All charts were reviewed for baseline characteristics and to confirm the presence/absence of syncope and to compare with the administrative coding. In a sample of 600 admitted patients 570 (95%) and of 150 patients from ED 140 (93%) had syncope representing the positive predictive values. Median age of the population was 69 years (IQR: ± 14). In the second sample of 5262 randomly selected medical patients, 75 (1.4%) had syncope, of which 47 were coded as R55.9 yielding a sensitivity of 62.7%, a negative predictive value of 99.5%, and a specificity of 99.9%.
ED and hospital discharge diagnostic coding for syncope has a positive predictive value of 95% and a sensitivity of 63%.
PubMed ID
23129545 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antithrombotic treatment in patients with heart failure and associated atrial fibrillation and vascular disease: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104350
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jun 24;63(24):2689-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2014
Author
Morten Lamberts
Gregory Y H Lip
Martin H Ruwald
Morten Lock Hansen
Cengiz Özcan
Søren L Kristensen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mortenlamberts@gmail.com.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jun 24;63(24):2689-98
Date
Jun-24-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation (AF) and antithrombotic treatment on the prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF) as well as vascular disease.
HF, vascular disease, and AF are pathophysiologically related, and understanding antithrombotic treatment for these conditions is crucial.
In hospitalized patients with HF and coexisting vascular disease (coronary artery disease or peripheral arterial disease) followed from 1997 to 2009, AF status was categorized as prevalent AF, incident AF, or no AF. Risk of thromboembolism (TE), myocardial infarction (MI), and serious bleeding was assessed by Cox regression models (hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI]) with antithrombotic therapy and AF as time-dependent variables.
A total of 37,464 patients were included (age, 74.5 ± 10.7 years; 36.3% females) with a mean follow-up of 3 years during which 20.7% were categorized as prevalent AF and 17.2% as incident AF. Compared with vitamin K antagonist (VKA) in prevalent AF, VKA plus antiplatelet was not associated with a decreased risk of TE (HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.73 to 1.12) or MI (HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.28), whereas bleeding risk was significantly increased (HR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.57). Corresponding estimates for incident AF were HRs of 0.77 (95% CI: 0.56 to 1.06), 1.07 (95% CI: 0.89 to 1.28), and 2.71 (95% CI: 1.33 to 2.21) for TE, MI, and bleeding, respectively. In no AF patients, no statistical differences were seen between antithrombotic therapies in TE or MI risk, whereas bleeding risk was significantly increased for VKA with and without single-antiplatelet therapy.
In AF patients with coexisting HF and vascular disease, adding single-antiplatelet therapy to VKA therapy is not associated with additional benefit in thromboembolic or coronary risk, but notably increased bleeding risk.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jun 24;63(24):2699-70124794117
PubMed ID
24794118 View in PubMed
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Automated external defibrillators inaccessible to more than half of nearby cardiac arrests in public locations during evening, nighttime, and weekends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107254
Source
Circulation. 2013 Nov 12;128(20):2224-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2013
Author
Carolina Malta Hansen
Mads Wissenberg
Peter Weeke
Martin Huth Ruwald
Morten Lamberts
Freddy Knudsen Lippert
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Søren Loumann Nielsen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Fredrik Folke
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup (C.M.H., M.W., P.W., M.H.R., M.L., G.H.G., F.F.); Emergency Medical Services, Copenhagen, Capital Region of Denmark and Copenhagen University (F.K.L., S.L.N.); National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen (G.H.G.); The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (L.K.); and Institute of Health, Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg (C.T.-P.), Denmark.
Source
Circulation. 2013 Nov 12;128(20):2224-31
Date
Nov-12-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
After-Hours Care - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - mortality
Cities - statistics & numerical data
Defibrillators - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Despite wide dissemination, use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in community settings is limited. We assessed how AED accessibility affected coverage of cardiac arrests in public locations.
We identified cardiac arrests in public locations (1994-2011) in terms of location and time and viewed them in relation to the location and accessibility of all AEDs linked to the emergency dispatch center as of December 31, 2011, in Copenhagen, Denmark. AED coverage of cardiac arrests was defined as cardiac arrests within 100 m (109.4 yd) of an AED and further categorized according to AED accessibility at the time of cardiac arrest. Daytime, evening, and nighttime were defined as 8 am to 3:59 pm, 4 to 11:59 pm, and midnight to 7:59 am, respectively. Of 1864 cardiac arrests in public locations, 61.8% (n=1152) occurred during the evening, nighttime, or weekends. Of 552 registered AEDs, 9.1% (n=50) were accessible at all hours, and 96.4% (n=532) were accessible during the daytime on all weekdays. Regardless of AED accessibility, 28.8% (537 of 1864) of all cardiac arrests were covered by an AED. Limited AED accessibility decreased coverage of cardiac arrests by 4.1% (9 of 217) during the daytime on weekdays and by 53.4% (171 of 320) during the evening, nighttime, and weekends.
Limited AED accessibility at the time of cardiac arrest decreased AED coverage by 53.4% during the evening, nighttime, and weekends, which is when 61.8% of all cardiac arrests in public locations occurred. Thus, not only strategic placement but also uninterrupted AED accessibility warrant attention if public-access defibrillation is to improve survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
PubMed ID
24036607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282560
Source
N Engl J Med. 2017 05 04;376(18):1737-1747
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-04-2017
Author
Kristian Kragholm
Mads Wissenberg
Rikke N Mortensen
Steen M Hansen
Carolina Malta Hansen
Kristinn Thorsteinsson
Shahzleen Rajan
Freddy Lippert
Fredrik Folke
Gunnar Gislason
Lars Køber
Kirsten Fonager
Svend E Jensen
Thomas A Gerds
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Bodil S Rasmussen
Source
N Engl J Med. 2017 05 04;376(18):1737-1747
Date
05-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Denmark
Electric Countershock
Female
Humans
Hypoxia, Brain - epidemiology - etiology
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - complications - mortality - therapy
Risk
Survival Analysis
Volunteers
Abstract
The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied.
We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes.
Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (P
PubMed ID
28467879 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease in survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer: a Danish cohort study, 1943-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104294
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Jun;106(6):dju110
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Kathrine Rugbjerg
Lene Mellemkjaer
John D Boice
Lars Køber
Marianne Ewertz
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Affiliations of authors: Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark (KR, LM, JHO); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (JDB); National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD (JDB); Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark (LK); Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark (ME). rugbjerg@cancer.dk.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Jun;106(6):dju110
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Hodgkin Disease - radiotherapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leukemia - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease has emerged as a serious late effect in survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer, but risk has not been quantified comprehensively in a population-based setting.
In the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified 43153 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed at ages 15 to 39 years (1943-2009) and alive in 1977; from the Danish Civil Registration System, we randomly selected a comparison cohort of the same age and sex. Subjects were linked to the Danish Patient Register, and observed numbers of first hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision codes I10-I79) were compared with the expected numbers derived from the comparison cohort. We calculated the absolute excess risks attributable to status as a survivor of cancer and standardized hospitalization rate ratios (RRs). All statistical tests were two-sided.
During follow-up, 10591 survivors (24.5%) were discharged from the hospital with cardiovascular disease, whereas 8124 were expected (RR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI)] = 1.28 to 1.33; P
PubMed ID
24848622 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among myocardial infarction patients--a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116575
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54309
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen
Emil L Fosbøl
Jesper Lindhardsen
Charlotte Andersson
Fredrik Folke
Mia B Nielsen
Lars Køber
Peter R Hansen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. amschjerning@gmail.com
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54309
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark
Diclofenac - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Lactones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Sulfones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase mortality and morbidity after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined cause-specific mortality and morbidity associated with NSAIDs in a nationwide cohort of MI patients.
By individual-level linkage of nationwide registries of hospitalization and drug dispensing from pharmacies in Denmark, patients aged >30 years admitted with first-time MI during 1997-2009 and their subsequent NSAID use were identified. The risk of three cardiovascular specific endpoints: cardiovascular death, the composite of coronary death and nonfatal MI, and the composite of fatal and nonfatal stroke, associated with NSAID use was analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analyses. Of 97,698 patients included 44.0% received NSAIDs during follow-up. Overall use of NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-1.49). In particular use of the nonselective NSAID diclofenac and the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death (HR 1.96 [1.79-2.15] and HR1.66 [1.44-1.91], respectively) with a dose dependent increase in risk. Use of ibuprofen was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death (HR 1.34[1.26-1.44]), whereas naproxen was associated with the lowest risk of (e.g., HR 1.27[1.01-1.59].
Use of individual NSAIDs is associated with different cause-specific cardiovascular risk and in particular rofecoxib and diclofenac were associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. These results support caution with use of all NSAIDs in patients with prior MI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23382889 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of the clinical outcome of different beta-blockers in heart failure patients: a retrospective nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260851
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Jun;16(6):678-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Rasmus Bølling
Nikolai Madrid Scheller
Lars Køber
Henrik Enghusen Poulsen
Gunnar H Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Jun;16(6):678-84
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare survival on different beta-blockers in heart failure.
We identified all Danish patients =35?years of age who were hospitalized with a first admission for heart failure and who initiated treatment with a beta-blocker within 60?days of discharge. The study period was 1995-2011. The main outcome was all-cause mortality and all-cause hospitalization. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare survival. The study included 58?634 patients of whom 30.121 (51.4%) died and 46.990 (80.1%) were hospitalized during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 4.1?years. In an unadjusted model carvedilol was associated with a lower mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 0.737, 0.714-0.761] compared with metoprolol (reference) while bisoprolol was not associated with an increased mortality (HR 1.020, 0.973-1.069). In a model adjusted for possible confounders and stratified according to beta-blocker dosages, patients that received high-dose carvedilol (=50?mg daily) had a lower all-cause mortality risk (HR 0.873, 0.789-0.966) than patients receiving high-dose (=200?mg daily) metoprolol (reference). High-dose bisoprolol (=10?mg daily) was associated with a greater risk of death (HR 1.125, 1.004-1.261). High-dose carvedilol was associated with significantly lower all-cause hospitalization risk (HR 0.842, 0.774-0.915) than high-dose metoprolol (reference), while high-dose bisoprolol had insignificantly lower risk than high-dose metoprolol (HR 0.948, 0.850-1.057).
Heart failure patients receiving high-dose carvedilol (=50?mg daily) showed significantly lower all-cause mortality risk and hospitalization risk, compared with other beta-blockers.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Jun;16(6):595-724863629
PubMed ID
24706485 View in PubMed
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Congestive heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function after acute myocardial infarction: clinical and prognostic implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53433
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2003 Dec;5(6):811-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Jacob Eifer Møller
Bente Brendorp
Michael Ottesen
Lars Køber
Kenneth Egstrup
Steen Hvitfelt Poulsen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. jem@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2003 Dec;5(6):811-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Denmark - epidemiology
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - etiology - mortality
Abstract
AIMS: To characterise the prevalence, in-hospital complications, management, and long-term outcome of patients with congestive heart failure but preserved left ventricular systolic function after acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: 3166 consecutive patients screened for entry in the Bucindolol Evaluation in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial with definite acute myocardial infarction and echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular systolic function were included between 1998 and 1999 in this prospective observational study. Main outcome measures were occurrences of in-hospital complications and all cause mortality. RESULTS: Congestive heart failure was seen during hospitalisation in 1464 patients (46%), 717 patients had preserved left ventricular systolic function (wall motion index > or =1.3 corresponding to ejection fraction > or =0.40), and 732 patients had systolic dysfunction (wall motion index
PubMed ID
14675860 View in PubMed
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Diabetes is an independent predictor of survival 17 years after myocardial infarction: follow-up of the TRACE registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143095
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2010;9:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Thomas Kümler
Gunnar H Gislason
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Rigshopitalet University Hospital, Blegdamsvej, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkumler@dadlnet.dk
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2010;9:22
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survivors
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction, there are limited data examining the long-term prognostic effect of diabetes. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the development of diabetes as an independent long-term prognostic factor after myocardial infarction.
Prospective follow-up of 6676 consecutive MI patients screened for entry in the Trandolapril Cardiac Evaluation (TRACE) study. The patients were analysed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, landmark analysis and Cox proportional hazard models and outcome measure was all-cause mortality.
The mortality in patients with diabetes was 82,7% at 10 years of follow-up and 91,1% at 15 years of follow-up, while patients without diabetes had a mortality of 60,2% at 10 years of follow-up and 72,9% at 15 years of follow-up (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
20525192 View in PubMed
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Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141913
Source
Circulation. 2010 Aug 10;122(6):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2010
Author
Fredrik Folke
Gunnar H Gislason
Freddy K Lippert
Søren L Nielsen
Peter Weeke
Morten L Hansen
Emil L Fosbøl
Søren S Andersen
Søren Rasmussen
Tina K Schramm
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. FF@heart.dk
Source
Circulation. 2010 Aug 10;122(6):623-30
Date
Aug-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - instrumentation - utilization
Defibrillators - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - trends
Female
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobile Health Units - manpower - trends
Population Surveillance
Public Facilities
Risk factors
Abstract
The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations.
We studied 4828 OHCAs in Copenhagen between 1994 and 2005. The incidence and characteristics of OHCA were examined in every 100 x 100-m (109.4 x 109.4-yd) residential area according to its underlying demographic characteristics. By combining > or =2 demographic characteristics, it was possible to identify 100 x 100-m (109.4 x 109.4-yd) areas with at least 1 arrest every 5.6 years (characterized by >300 persons per area and lowest income) to 1 arrest every 4.3 years (characterized by >300 persons per area, lowest income, low education, and highest age). These areas covered 9.0% and 0.8% of all residential OHCAs, respectively. Individuals with OHCA in residential locations differed from public ones in that the patients were older (70.6 versus 60.6 years; P
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2010 Aug 10;122(6):567-920660801
PubMed ID
20660807 View in PubMed
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