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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116740
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Bread
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fragaria
Fruit
Humans
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Photinia
Postprandial Period - physiology
Ribes
Secale cereale
Single-Blind Method
Starch - administration & dosage
Triticum
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Vaccinium myrtillus
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Abstract
Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.
PubMed ID
23365108 View in PubMed
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[Diet of six-year-old Icelandic children - National dietary survey 2011-2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117006
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Hafdis Helgadottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Iceland. ingigun@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Iceland
Minerals
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Knowledge of dietary habits makes the basis for public nutrition policy. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake of Icelandic six-year-olds.
Subjects were randomly selected six-year-old children (n=162). Dietary intake was assessed by three-day-weighed food records. Food and nutrient intake was compared with the Icelandic food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and recommended intake of vitamins and minerals.
Fruit and vegetable intake was on average 275±164 g/d, and less than 20% of the subjects consumed =400 g/day. Fish and cod liver oil intake was in line with the FBDG among approximately 25% of subjects. Most subjects (87%) consumed at least two portions of dairy products daily. Food with relatively low nutrient density (cakes, cookies, sugar sweetened drinks, sweets and ice-cream) provided up to 25% of total energy intake. The contribution of saturated fatty acids to total energy intake was 14.1%. Less than 20% of the children consumed dietary fibers in line with recommendations, and for saturated fat and salt only 5% consumed less than the recommended upper limits. Average intake of most vitamins and minerals, apart from vitamin-D, was higher than the recommended intake.
Although the vitamin and mineral density of the diet seems adequate, with the exception of vitamin-D, the contribution of low energy density food to total energy intake is high. Intake of vegetables, fruits, fish and cod liver oil is not in line with public recommendations. Strategies aiming at improving diet of young children are needed.
PubMed ID
23341402 View in PubMed
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Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271271
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Ari Haukkala
Agneta Yngve
Inga Thorsdottir
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Diet - standards
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Friends
Fruit
Humans
Male
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.
PubMed ID
26450715 View in PubMed
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Nontargeted metabolite profiling discriminates diet-specific biomarkers for consumption of whole grains, fatty fish, and bilberries in a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260617
Source
J Nutr. 2015 Jan;145(1):7-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Kati Hanhineva
Maria A Lankinen
Anna Pedret
Ursula Schwab
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Jussi Paananen
Vanessa de Mello
Rosa Sola
Marko Lehtonen
Kaisa Poutanen
Matti Uusitupa
Hannu Mykkänen
Source
J Nutr. 2015 Jan;145(1):7-17
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Cereals
Chromatography, Liquid
Diet
Fasting
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food Habits
Food, Fortified
Fruit
Furans - blood
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Metabolome
Propionates - blood
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Vaccinium myrtillus
Abstract
Nontargeted metabolite profiling allows for concomitant examination of a wide range of metabolite species, elucidating the metabolic alterations caused by dietary interventions.
The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of dietary modifications on the basis of increasing consumption of whole grains, fatty fish, and bilberries on plasma metabolite profiles to identify applicable biomarkers for dietary intake and endogenous metabolism.
Metabolite profiling analysis was performed on fasting plasma samples collected in a 12-wk parallel-group intervention with 106 participants with features of metabolic syndrome who were randomly assigned to 3 dietary interventions: 1) whole-grain products, fatty fish, and bilberries [healthy diet (HD)]; 2) a whole-grain-enriched diet with the same grain products as in the HD intervention but with no change in fish or berry consumption; and 3) refined-wheat breads and restrictions on fish and berries (control diet). In addition, correlation analyses were conducted with the food intake data to define the food items correlating with the biomarker candidates.
Nontargeted metabolite profiling showed marked differences in fasting plasma after the intervention diets compared with the control diet. In both intervention groups, a significant increase was observed in 2 signals identified as glucuronidated alk(en)-ylresorcinols [corrected P value (Pcorr)
PubMed ID
25527657 View in PubMed
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Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122027
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. riitta.torronen@uef.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):527-33
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Beverages - analysis
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Finland
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hyperinsulinism - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Ribes - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Vaccinium vitis-idaea - chemistry
Abstract
Sucrose induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. In vitro studies suggest that berries may reduce the digestion and absorption of sucrose and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited.
We investigated the effects of sucrose ingested with blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum) and lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) on postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses.
Twenty healthy women participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. They consumed whole blackcurrants or lingonberries (150 g served as purées) or blackcurrant or lingonberry nectars (300 mL), each with 35 g added sucrose. Sucrose alone (35 g in 300 mL water) was used as a reference. Blood samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min.
In comparison with sucrose alone, ingestion of sucrose with whole berries resulted in reduced glucose and insulin concentrations during the first 30 min and a slower decline during the second hour and a significantly improved glycemic profile. Berries prevented the sucrose-induced late postprandial hypoglycemic response and the compensatory free fatty acid rebound. Nearly similar effects were observed when sucrose was consumed with berry nectars. The improved responses were evident despite the higher content of available carbohydrate in the berry and nectar meals, because of the natural sugars present in berries.
Blackcurrants and lingonberries, as either whole berries or nectars, optimize the postprandial metabolic responses to sucrose. The responses are consistent with delayed digestion of sucrose and consequent slower absorption of glucose.
PubMed ID
22854401 View in PubMed
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The PRO GREENS intervention in Finnish schoolchildren - the degree of implementation affects both mediators and the intake of fruits and vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258776
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2014
Author
Reetta Lehto
Suvi Määttä
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Saskia Te Velde
Nanna Lien
Inga Thorsdottir
Agneta Yngve
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Date
Oct-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet
Europe
Faculty
Female
Finland
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Plan Implementation
Health promotion
Humans
Male
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Snacks
Students
Vegetables
Abstract
Little is known about the mediating effects of the determinants of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in school-based interventions that promote FV intake, and few studies have examined the impact of the degree of implementation on the effects of an intervention. The present study examined whether the degree of implementation of an intervention had an effect on children's fruit or vegetable intake and determined possible mediators of this effect. The study is part of the European PRO GREENS intervention study which aimed to develop effective strategies to promote consumption of fruit and vegetables in schoolchildren across Europe. Data from 727 Finnish children aged 11 years were used. The baseline study was conducted in spring 2009 and the follow-up study 12 months later. The intervention was conducted during the school year 2009-2010. The effects were examined using multilevel mediation analyses. A high degree of implementation of the intervention had an effect on children's fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and liking mediated the association between a high degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and bringing fruits to school as a snack mediated the association between a low degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Overall, the model accounted for 34 % of the variance in the change in fruit intake frequency. Knowledge of recommendations acted as a mediator between the degree of implementation of the intervention and the change in vegetable intake frequency. In conclusion, the degree of implementation had an effect on fruit intake, and thus in future intervention studies the actual degree of implementation of interventions should be assessed when considering the effects of interventions.
PubMed ID
25106046 View in PubMed
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The quality of school lunch consumed reflects overall eating patterns in 11-16-year-old schoolchildren in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132992
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2092-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Tanja Tilles-Tirkkonen
Saara Pentikäinen
Jenni Lappi
Leila Karhunen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Food and Health Research Centre, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. tanja.tilles@hotmail.com
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2092-8
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Choice Behavior
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Humans
Lunch
Male
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Schools
Snacks
Vegetables
Abstract
To explore how the quality of school lunch consumed reflected overall eating patterns in school-aged children.
Children filled in an Internet-based questionnaire about their eating patterns. The children were then divided into balanced and imbalanced school lunch eaters on the basis of their responses in the questionnaire. A balanced school lunch consisted of, by the definition used in the present study, a main dish, salad and bread.
Eleven primary schools and one middle school in eastern Finland.
A total of 531 schoolchildren (247 boys and 284 girls) aged 11-16 years.
The school lunch was balanced in 46·5% of children. Eating a balanced school lunch was associated with overall healthier eating patterns outside school. Children who ate a balanced school lunch had more regular meal times and consumed healthier snacks. They ate fruit or berries and vegetables, dairy products and wholegrain foods more often, consumed fewer salty snacks, pizzas, meat pies and drank fewer soft drinks and energy drinks. Their eating patterns at home were also healthier, with vegetables being offered at every family dinner and fruit being offered daily, whereas soft drinks were offered seldom.
The choices made by children in their school lunch reflect the overall eating patterns among school-aged children. Eating a balanced school lunch is associated with more regular meal patterns, the availability of healthier foods at home and an overall healthier diet, suggesting that healthy eating patterns are learnt at home.
PubMed ID
21752309 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.