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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99436
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Hansen
Lars O Dragsted
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.
PubMed ID
20178672 View in PubMed
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Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
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Intake of fruit and vegetables and the risk of ischemic stroke in a cohort of Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18362
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jul;78(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Søren P Johnsen
Kim Overvad
Connie Stripp
Anne Tjønneland
Steen E Husted
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. spj@soci.au.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jul;78(1):57-64
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Ischemia - complications
Cerebrovascular Accident - etiology - prevention & control
Citrus
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that a high dietary intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke. The magnitude of the effect is uncertain, and only one study reported data on the intake of specific fruit and vegetables and the risk of stroke. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke, with particular attention paid to specific fruit and vegetables and subtypes of ischemic stroke. DESIGN: In a prospective cohort study of 54,506 men and women who were included in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health study from 1993 to 1997, estimated total intakes of fruit and vegetables (in g/d) were extracted from a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire completed at baseline. Data about subjects hospitalized with ischemic stroke were obtained from the Danish National Registry of Patients and were verified later by record reviews. The follow-up for ischemic stroke ended on the date of a first hospital admission for stroke or transient ischemic attack, the date of death or emigration, or the end of the study, whichever came first. RESULTS: We identified 266 cases of ischemic stroke involving hospitalization during 168,388 person-years of follow-up (median follow-up: 3.09 y; range: 0.02-5.10 y). After adjustment for potential confounders, persons in the top quintile of fruit and vegetable intake (median: 673 g/d) had a risk ratio of ischemic stroke of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.12) relative to persons in the bottom quintile of intake (median: 147 g/d) (P for trend = 0.04). When comparing the top quintile with the bottom quintile, an inverse association was most evident for fruit intake (risk ratio: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.95; P for trend = 0.02). Similar risk estimates were seen for most types of fruit and vegetables, although the risks were significant only for citrus fruit. CONCLUSION: An increased intake of fruit may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke.
PubMed ID
12816771 View in PubMed
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