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Ideology of nursing care in child psychiatric inpatient treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161073
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2007 Sep;14(5):583-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Heikki Ellilä
Maritta Välimäki
Tony Warne
Andre Sourander
Author Affiliation
Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland. heikki.ellila@turkuamk.fi
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2007 Sep;14(5):583-96
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - education - ethics - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child Psychiatry - education - ethics - organization & administration
Child, Hospitalized
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Milieu Therapy
Models, Nursing
Nurse Administrators - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Patient-Centered Care
Philosophy, Nursing
Psychiatric Nursing - education - ethics - organization & administration
Psychoanalytic Therapy
Psychotherapy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
Research on nursing ideology and the ethics of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing care is limited. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the ideological approaches guiding psychiatric nursing in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards in Finland, and discuss the ethical, theoretical and practical concerns related to nursing ideologies. Data were collected by means of a national questionnaire survey, which included one open-ended question seeking managers' opinions on the nursing ideology used in their area of practice. Questionnaires were sent to all child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards (n = 69) in Finland; 61 ward managers responded. Data were analysed by qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Six categories -- family centred care, individual care, milieu centred care, integrated care, educational care and psychodynamic care -- were formed to specify ideological approaches used in inpatient nursing. The majority of the wards were guided by two or more approaches. Nursing models, theories and codes of ethics were almost totally ignored in the ward managers' ideological descriptions.
PubMed ID
17901170 View in PubMed
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Developing an evidence-based curriculum designed to help psychiatric nurses learn to use computers and the Internet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155102
Source
J Prof Nurs. 2008 Sep-Oct;24(5):302-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marita Koivunen
Maritta Välimäki
Tiina Jakobsson
Anneli Pitkänen
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Prof Nurs. 2008 Sep-Oct;24(5):302-14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Literacy
Computer User Training - methods
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Nursing
Female
Finland
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Qualitative Research
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This article describes the systematic process in which an evidence-based approach was used to develop a curriculum designed to support the computer and Internet skills of nurses in psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The pressure on organizations to have skilled and motivated nurses who use modern information and communication technology in health care organizations has increased due to rapid technology development at the international and national levels. However, less frequently has the development of those computer education curricula been based on evidence-based knowledge. First, we identified psychiatric nurses' learning experiences and barriers to computer use by examining written essays. Second, nurses' computer skills were surveyed. Last, evidence from the literature was scrutinized to find effective methods that can be used to teach and learn computer use in health care. This information was integrated and used for the development process of an education curriculum designed to support nurses' computer and Internet skills.
PubMed ID
18804084 View in PubMed
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Impact of an e-Learning Course on Clinical Practice in Psychiatric Hospitals: Nurse Managers' Views.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279512
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2016 Jan;52(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Mari E Lahti
Raija M Kontio
Maritta Välimäki
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2016 Jan;52(1):40-8
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Administrators - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education
Qualitative Research
Staff Development - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
e-Learning is one way to provide continuing education and has been shown to be an effective method. However, little is known about how psychiatric organizations benefit from continuing education.
The aim of this study was to use Kirkpatrick's four-level model to evaluate an e-learning continuing education course from the perspectives of nursing managers in psychiatric hospital organizations.
This qualitative design evaluated one e-learning course using Kirkpatrick's model as an evaluation frame.
Nursing managers noticed positive, neutral, and negative reactions after the course. Nursing managers also reported that the nurses' learning evolved.
PubMed ID
25624098 View in PubMed
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eLearning course may shorten the duration of mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients: a cluster-randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259110
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):443-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Raija Kontio
Anneli Pitkänen
Grigori Joffe
Jouko Katajisto
Maritta Välimäki
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;68(7):443-9
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Coercion
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Education, Nursing, Continuing - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Restraint, Physical - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Time Factors
Abstract
The management of psychiatric inpatients exhibiting severely disturbed and aggressive behaviour is an important educational topic. Well structured, IT-based educational programmes (eLearning) often ensure quality and may make training more affordable and accessible.
The aim of this study was to explore the impact of an eLearning course for personnel on the rates and duration of seclusion and mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients.
In a cluster-randomized intervention trial, the nursing personnel on 10 wards were randomly assigned to eLearning (intervention) or training-as-usual (control) groups. The eLearning course comprised six modules with specific topics (legal and ethical issues, behaviour-related factors, therapeutic relationship and self-awareness, teamwork and integrating knowledge with practice) and specific learning methods. The rates (incidents per 1000 occupied bed days) and durations of the coercion incidents were examined before and after the course.
A total of 1283 coercion incidents (1143 seclusions [89%] and 140 incidents involving the use of mechanical restraints [11%]) were recorded on the study wards during the data collection period. On the intervention wards, there were no statistically significant changes in the rates of seclusion and mechanical restraint. However, the duration of incidents involving mechanical restraints shortened from 36.0 to 4.0 h (median) (P
PubMed ID
24274836 View in PubMed
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Barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation of an interactive Internet-portal application for patient education in psychiatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159811
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Mar;70(3):412-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Marita Koivunen
Heli Hätönen
Maritta Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Satakunta Hospital District and University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Turku, Finland. mhkoivu@utu.fi
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Mar;70(3):412-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Literacy
Computer User Training
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients - education - psychology
Internet - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation of an interactive Internet-portal application for patient education in psychiatric hospitals.
The data were collected from nurses by means of a questionnaire with thematic open-ended questions. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.
Four main categories were formed to describe barriers and facilitators of portal implementation in psychiatric wards. These categories were organisational resources, nurses' individual characteristics, patient-related factors and portal-related factors. Some major barriers were identified restricting the use of the portal in patient education: lack of computers, lack of time for patients, nurses' negative attitudes towards computer use and lack of education. The main facilitators for portal use were appropriate technological resources, easy Internet access, enough time for portal use, and level of motivation among staff to use computers.
The specific challenge in achieving patient education with the computer in psychiatric care is to ensure technological resources and that the staff are motivated to use computers. At the same time, attention should be paid the relationship between patient and nurse.
It is important to examine the patient-nurse relationship in the education process and also to define the usability of the application from the patients' point of view.
PubMed ID
18079085 View in PubMed
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Hypertension guideline implementation: experiences of Finnish primary care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157305
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2008 Oct;14(5):830-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Seija Alanen
Jarja Ijäs
Minna Kaila
Marjukka Mäkelä
Maritta Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. seija.alanen@pshp.fi
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2008 Oct;14(5):830-5
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Practice - education - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Evidence-based guidelines on hypertension have been developed in many western countries. Yet, there is little evidence of their impact on the clinical practices of primary care nurses.
We assessed the style of implementation and adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in 32 Finnish health centres classified in a previous study as 'disseminators' (n = 13) or 'implementers' (n = 19). A postal questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n = 409) working in the outpatient services in these health centres. Additionally, senior nursing officers were telephoned to enquire if the implementation of the HT Guideline had led to a new division of labour between nurses and doctors.
Questionnaires were returned from 327 nurses (80.0%), while all senior nursing officers (n = 32) were contacted. The majority of nurses were of the opinion that the HT Guideline has been adopted into clinical practice. The recommendations in the HT Guideline were adopted in clinical practice with varying success, and slightly more often in implementer health centres than in disseminator health centres. Nurses in implementer health centres more often agreed that multiple channels had been used in the implementation (P
PubMed ID
18462289 View in PubMed
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Patient learning centre Soppi: A way to promote human-computer interaction in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166543
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:778
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Tuija Alaranta
Heljä Nenonen
Maritta Välimäki
Riitta Suhonen
Author Affiliation
Hyvinkää Hospital, Hospital district of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Finland. tuija.alaranta@hus.fi
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:778
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Finland
Humans
Medical Informatics
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
The Patient Learning Centre was founded in Hyvinkää Hospital in 2000 to support patients and their families' informational needs. In order to evaluate the Learning Centre's effectiveness we started a development project. One of the purposes was to analyze patients' Internet and computer use. The data for the describing survey-research was collected by questionnaires at two occasions. At the end of the project a number of patients who used internet had increased, one third did not use a computer at all. Getting information in discussions with the nurse was however the most important way. To develop user friendly methods in getting information is a challenge.
PubMed ID
17102376 View in PubMed
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Knowledge transfer from an e-learning course to clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270076
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 May;34(5):842-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Mari Lahti
Raija Kontio
Anneli Pitkänen
Maritta Välimäki
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 May;34(5):842-7
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
Continuing education is essential in improving practical psychiatric nursing skills. However, little is known about how knowledge gained in continuing education is transferred to nurses' daily work.
To describe the transfer of knowledge gained from an e-learning course to daily practice.
Qualitative study design.
One hospital district in Southern Finland with three specialized psychiatric wards (acute, rehabilitation, geriatric wards).
Nursing staff (N=53) were recruited and 35 participated voluntarily in the e-learning continuing education course in spring 2009.
The data comprised nurses' reflective writing during the e-learning course and course evaluation forms completed after the course. We used qualitative design with inductive content analysis to analyze nurses' writings.
The nurses were willing and able to transfer what they learned to their daily practice including the course themes, communication and co-operation among staff members, understanding of preventive and alternative treatment methods and critical thinking regarding one's own work. After the e-learning course the nurses were able to identify development areas such as issues related to staff members' daily work, the patient's role on the ward, alternative methods to avoid coercion, issues pertaining to the care environment on the ward, psychiatric nurses' education, and making an action plan for aggressive situations. All nurses would recommend the course to other nurses.
New knowledge is easily adopted and transferred to daily practice.
PubMed ID
24075712 View in PubMed
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Use of web-based patient education sessions on psychiatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126543
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Jun;81(6):424-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Minna Anttila
Maritta Välimäki
Heli Hätönen
Tiina Luukkaala
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science and University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Jun;81(6):424-33
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Education, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the use of web-based patient education sessions in the psychiatric inpatient care.
The qualitative and quantitative data was collected from 93 patients' evaluation reports in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland completed by 83 nurses.
The web-education included six patient education sessions which were used over a period lasting between 1 and 70 days and took 10-360 min per patient. Out of 508 sessions, 464 had no interruptions or disturbances, 37 sessions had disturbances and seven sessions were interrupted. Three fourths of the sessions were used successfully. Factors associated with use were patients' vocational education level, mental status, diagnoses, number of nurses involved and hospital.
It is important to invest effort in web-based patient education during patients' hospitalization and to use it even with patients suffering from serious mental health disorders. This is meant to provide more alternatives in nursing.
PubMed ID
22381805 View in PubMed
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An analysis of online health information on schizophrenia or related conditions: a cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107609
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Athanasopoulou
Heli Hätönen
Sanna Suni
Christos Lionis
Kathleen M Griffiths
Maritta Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. chatha@utu.fi.
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:98
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Greece
Humans
Information Services - standards
Internet
Patient Education as Topic - standards
Schizophrenia
Abstract
Around 20% of those who seek health information online, search specifically for mental health. However, little is known about the nature of the online health information offered by two European countries, Finland and Greece, which are characterized by markedly differing levels of Internet access and online health information seeking. This study aims to assess, describe and compare websites, written in two European, non-English languages (Finnish and Greek) that appear first after performing an online search concerning schizophrenia or related conditions.
The first 20 results from four search terms (searched in Finnish and Greek) in the Web search engine 'Google' were screened. A total of 160 websites were retrieved (80 Finnish, 80 Greek) and evaluated using a preformulated coding system which consisted of websites' indicators, such as: types, characteristics, accountability, interactivity, aesthetics and content. Differences between websites were evaluated with Chi-Square or Fisher's Exact tests for categorical data and independent t-tests for parametric data.
Twenty-four Finnish and thirty-four Greek websites (36% in total) were included. Almost two-thirds (62%, n=36) were owned by an organization, compared to 17% (n=10) by an individual. In both countries, aesthetics had the highest score (possible range 0-4, mean = 2.6, SD = .62), while interactivity the lowest (range 0-5, mean = 1.79, SD = .87). There were no statistically significant differences among the accountability, interactivity and aesthetics scores of the Finnish and Greek websites.
All assessed indicators suggest there is a need to improve Finnish and Greek online information about schizophrenia or related conditions. The poor website interactivity is of particular concern given the challenges faced by the target group. The findings can be used to guide the development and dissemination of online mental health information aimed at Finnish and Greek online health-seekers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23992448 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.