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Analysis of 3789 in- and outpatient Escherichia coli isolates from across Canada--results of the CANWARD 2007-2009 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136687
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):314-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Patricia J Simner
Kevin R Forward
Franil Tailor
Heather J Adam
Melanie Decorby
James Karlowsky
Daryl J Hoban
George G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, St. Boniface General Hospital/Diagnostic Services of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2H 2A6. plagacewiens@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):314-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inpatients
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - metabolism
Abstract
Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated pathogen in the Canadian Ward Surveillance Study 2007-2009 (3789 isolates). Susceptibility to cefazolin (34.1%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (73.8%), ciprofloxacin (78.4%), and levofloxacin (78.8%) was lowest. Susceptibility was above 90% for meropenem (100%), tigecycline (99.9%), piperacillin-tazobactam (97.6%), nitrofurantoin (96.9%), ceftazidime (95.6%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (94.9%), ceftriaxone (94.1%), cefoxitin (92.3%), and gentamicin (90.8%). Over the study period, there was a significant reduction in susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanate and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for urinary tract isolates. Inpatient status was associated with greater resistance to nearly all antimicrobials including greater multidrug resistance (MDR). Increasing age was associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones, ceftriaxone, piperacillin-tazobactam, and MDR. Female gender was associated with susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and nitrofurantoin. In conclusion, greater antimicrobial resistance and MDR in E. coli were observed in inpatients, males, and with increasing age. The deterioration of susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole continues with the greatest reduction in urinary isolates. Significant regional differences in resistance rates were apparent.
PubMed ID
21353959 View in PubMed
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Changes in fluoroquinolone resistance over 5 years (CANWARD 2007-11) in bacterial pathogens isolated in Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114608
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 May;68 Suppl 1:i39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
James A Karlowsky
Heather J Adam
Marc Desjardins
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Daryl J Hoban
George G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Health Sciences Centre/Diagnostic Services of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3A 1R9. jkarlowsky@dsmanitoba.ca
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 May;68 Suppl 1:i39-46
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteria - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - history - microbiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology - history - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Female
Fluoroquinolones - pharmacology
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to analyse Canadian national surveillance data, specifically fluoroquinolone resistance, from 2007 to 2011 inclusive, to determine trends in resistance over time and to assess correlations with patient demographic factors.
All isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae collected by the 10 sites that participated in the annual CANWARD surveillance studies in each of the 5 years were included in this analysis. A multifactorial logistic regression model was used to determine the variables with significant impact on fluoroquinolone resistance.
The proportion of E. coli isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin increased significantly (P = 0.0005) between 2007 (20.0%) and 2011 (29.2%), although similar increases were not seen in K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae (tested against levofloxacin) (P > 0.05). Among isolates of S. aureus, there was a significant decrease in ciprofloxacin resistance from 34.4% in 2007 to 24.6% in 2011 (P
PubMed ID
23587777 View in PubMed
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In vitro activity of ceftaroline-avibactam against gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens isolated from patients in Canadian hospitals from 2010 to 2012: results from the CANWARD surveillance study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107767
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Nov;57(11):5600-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
James A Karlowsky
Heather J Adam
Melanie R Baxter
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Andrew J Walkty
Daryl J Hoban
George G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Diagnostic Services Manitoba.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Nov;57(11):5600-11
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Azabicyclo Compounds - pharmacology
Canada
Cephalosporins - pharmacology
Cross Infection - drug therapy - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - drug effects
Drug Synergism
Drug Therapy, Combination
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Public Health Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The in vitro activities of ceftaroline-avibactam, ceftaroline, and comparative agents were determined for a collection of bacterial pathogens frequently isolated from patients seeking care at 15 Canadian hospitals from January 2010 to December 2012. In total, 9,758 isolates were tested by using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution method (document M07-A9, 2012), with MICs interpreted by using CLSI breakpoints (document M100-S23, 2013). Ceftaroline-avibactam demonstrated potent activity (MIC90, = 0.5 µg/ml) against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Citrobacter freundii, and Haemophilus influenzae; >99% of isolates of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, P. mirabilis, M. morganii, C. freundii, and H. influenzae were susceptible to ceftaroline-avibactam according to CLSI MIC interpretative criteria for ceftaroline. Ceftaroline was less active than ceftaroline-avibactam against all species of Enterobacteriaceae tested, with rates of susceptibility ranging from 93.9% (P. mirabilis) to 54.0% (S. marcescens). All isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MIC90, 0.25 µg/ml) and 99.6% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates (MIC90, 1 µg/ml) were susceptible to ceftaroline; the addition of avibactam to ceftaroline did not alter its activity against staphylococci or streptococci. All isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90, 0.03 µg/ml), Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC90, = 0.03 µg/ml), and Streptococcus agalactiae (MIC90, 0.015 µg/ml) tested were susceptible to ceftaroline. We conclude that combining avibactam with ceftaroline expanded its spectrum of activity to include most isolates of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, including extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-producing E. coli and ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, while maintaining potent activity against staphylococci and streptococci.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23979759 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiology of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-, AmpC ß-lactamase- and carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from Canadian hospitals over a 5 year period: CANWARD 2007-11.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114606
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 May;68 Suppl 1:i57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Andrew J Denisuik
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Johann D Pitout
Michael R Mulvey
Patricia J Simner
Franil Tailor
James A Karlowsky
Daryl J Hoban
Heather J Adam
George G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E 0J9. adenisuik@mymts.net
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 May;68 Suppl 1:i57-65
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteria - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology - history
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - history
Female
Genotype
History, 21st Century
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - history
Klebsiella pneumoniae - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Young Adult
beta-Lactam Resistance - genetics
beta-Lactamases - genetics
Abstract
To assess the proportion of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from Canadian hospitals that produce extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC ß-lactamases and carbapenemases, as well as to describe the patterns of antibiotic resistance and molecular characteristics of these organisms.
Some 5451 E. coli and 1659 K. pneumoniae were collected from 2007 to 2011 inclusive as part of the ongoing CANWARD national surveillance study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed to detect putative ESBL, AmpC and carbapenemase producers, which were then further characterized by PCR and sequencing to detect resistance genes. In addition, isolates were characterized by PFGE and an allele-specific PCR to detect isolates of sequence type (ST) 131.
The proportion of ESBL-producing E. coli (2007, 3.4%; 2011, 7.1%), AmpC-producing E. coli (2007, 0.7%; 2011, 2.9%) and ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (2007, 1.5%; 2011, 4.0%) among the isolates collected increased during the study period. The majority of ESBL-producing E. coli (>95%), AmpC-producing E. coli (>97%) and ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae (>89%) remained susceptible to colistin, amikacin, ertapenem and meropenem. Isolates were generally unrelated by PFGE (
PubMed ID
23587779 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and characterization of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase- and AmpC ß-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli: results of the CANWARD 2007-2009 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136685
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):326-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Patricia J Simner
George G Zhanel
Johann Pitout
Franil Tailor
Melissa McCracken
Michael R Mulvey
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Heather J Adam
Daryl J Hoban
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E 0J9. trishsimner@gmail.com
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):326-34
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Escherichia coli - drug effects - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Genotype
Hospitals
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Typing
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
beta-Lactam Resistance - genetics
beta-Lactamases - genetics
Abstract
The national prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing (2007: 3.4%, 2008: 4.9%, 2009: 4.3%) and AmpC ß-lactamase (AmpC)-producing (2007: 0.8%, 2008: 3.2%, 2009: 2.7%) Escherichia coli in Canadian hospitals have fluctuated from 2007 to 2009. Rates of co-resistance to non-lactam agents are elevated, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype were observed among E. coli strains producing ESBLs (83.3% MDR) and AmpCs (31.0%). The majority (>98%) of isolates remained susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, amikacin, and the carbapenems. CMY-2 encoding gene was detected in 52.9% of AmpC-producing strains, while bla(CTX-M-15) (65.2%) was the predominant ESBL genotype. A total of 50.3% of ESBL-producing E. coli and 21.4% of AmpC producers belonged to the ST131 clone. In conclusion, ESBL- and AmpC-producing E. coli are established in Canadian hospitals; and although the prevalence rates of these isolates remain low, they are often MDR and associated with the ST131 clone.
PubMed ID
21353961 View in PubMed
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