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Exploring perceptions of healthcare professionals in the implementation of a new professional role of clinical telehealth coordinator within a university integrated healthcare network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142627
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2010 Jun;16(5):614-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Carine Payette
Johanne Desrochers
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Marie-Claire Richer
Author Affiliation
McGill University School of Nursing, Montréal, Québec, Canada. carine.payette@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2010 Jun;16(5):614-9
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology
Pharmacists - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Professional Role - psychology
Program Development
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Student Health Services - organization & administration
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Universities - organization & administration
Abstract
As telehealth networks develop across Canada, new professional roles start to emerge. A university healthcare center part of an integrated health network has identified the need to introduce a clinical coordinator for specialized telehealth programs. However, very little is found in the current literature about the description or core competencies that such a professional should possess as well as the ways to implement this role. The objective of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals (HCPs) involved in a specialized teleoncology program perceive a new clinical telehealth coordinator (CTC) role within a university integrated healthcare network (UIHN) in a metropolitan area in Québec, Canada.
A descriptive qualitative design was used and a purposive sample of nine HCPs, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists who were members of a UIHN teleoncology committee, was recruited.
The HCPs identified that the CTC was a multifaceted role. The core competencies identified by the HCPs included knowledge, expertise, and experience. Participants identified three key factors in the implementation of this role, namely, the structural support, having a common language, and making the implementation of this role relevant.
The results suggest that this CTC role may be more complex than originally expected and that the diverse competencies suggest an expanded nature to this role. This has important implications for administrative strategies when addressing the key factors in the implementation of this role.
PubMed ID
20575730 View in PubMed
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New approaches of organizing care and work: giving way to participation, mobilization, and innovation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174530
Source
Health Care Manag (Frederick). 2005 Apr-Jun;24(2):150-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chantal Viens
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Martine Mayrand Leclerc
Louise Hamelin Brabant
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University Laval, Quebec, Canada. Chantal.viens@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Health Care Manag (Frederick). 2005 Apr-Jun;24(2):150-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making, Organizational
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Hospital Restructuring - methods
Humans
Institutional Management Teams
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Nursing Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Psychology, Industrial
Quebec
Staff Development
Abstract
Quebec's health network has undertaken large-scale organizational changes to ensure the continuity, accessibility, and quality of health care and services for the population. This article describes the optimal approach for making changes to the organization of care and work for patients, health care workers, and organizations. This participative action research was carried out by means of interviews and document analysis. One hundred participants were involved, describing a total of 34 projects for significant organizational change. Results include an optimal approach broken down into 4 phases, each of which includes steps, facilitating factors, and potential difficulties. The phases of this approach are: (1) sharing the vision, mission, and values of the organization and identifying the purpose and need underlying the change; (2) building alliances and validating the involvement of the various players; (3) conceptualizing and planning the project; and (4) implementing changes and continuing evaluation. It is possible to rise to the challenge of finding new approaches to organize care and work by giving way to participation, mobilization, and innovation.
PubMed ID
15923927 View in PubMed
Less detail