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The need of leadership for motivation of participants in a community intervention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225796
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):190-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
G. Bjärås
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Social Medicine, Kronan Health Centre, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):190-8
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Motivation
Sweden
Abstract
It is important to know if a community intervention programme actually exists. The level of programme development depends on the extent of participation. The community participation can not be assessed by only using quantitative methods, there is also a need even for qualitative evaluation in order to identity details about the participation process. The purpose of this paper is to describe analysis using data coming from interviews and diaries, demonstrating both how people participate in a community intervention programme aimed at preventing accidents and why. What is the significance of the leadership in maintaining a programme in the long run? The findings show that the leader or leaders are the most important factors in maintaining a community intervention programme. The study demonstrates the necessity of a leader supporting and stimulating participation. There are also some personal reasons why people participate. The involvement is very much correlated with the personality of the programme adopters. As long as an individual can perceive personal gains from participating in the programme, it is of interest to her/him.
PubMed ID
1796253 View in PubMed
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The potential of community diagnosis as a tool in planning an intervention programme aimed at preventing injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36385
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Feb;25(1):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
G. Bjärås
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Social Medicine, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Feb;25(1):3-10
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Adolescent
Aged
Child
Community Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Participation
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Safety
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Injuries due to accidents are a serious public health problem in Sweden as in the rest of the world. In Sweden injuries are the most frequent cause of death among people under the age of 50. More than 75% of all injuries occur in the home or surrounding area. Most accidents strike children, teenagers, and the elderly. Many accidents can be avoided. Prevention is therefore important. A community intervention programme for the prevention of accidents has been developed in the municipality of Sollentuna in Stockholm County. During the planning phase, a basic analysis of the local community was found to be useful, i.e. a Community Diagnosis, which includes three stages: description, analysis, and a health action programme. This report concentrates on the first two stages. To make a community diagnosis, some basic data are needed. In this report the relevance of the existing registers to the Community Diagnosis model is discussed. It is also shown how the Community Diagnosis model helped in the planning phase: the community profile demonstrated whom the prevention should be aimed at, the health profile emphasized the importance of accident prevention, the health risk profile showed where to change the environment, and last, the organizational profile elucidated how preventive work should be organized.
PubMed ID
8420533 View in PubMed
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Walking campaign: a model for developing participation in physical activity? Experiences from three campaign periods of the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47798
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Jan;42(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
G. Bjärås
L K Härberg
J. Sydhoff
C G Ostenson
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. gunbja@divmed.ks.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Jan;42(1):9-14
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - prevention & control
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Urban health
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP) is implementing a model for community-based intervention of type 2 diabetes in three municipalities, of which one has focused on increasing physical activity among the inhabitants. The purpose was to emphasize the integration of walking into daily routines. The campaign was promoted throughout residential areas, organizations and local media. Leaders for organized walking were recruited as volunteers by advertising in local media. After a short education in leadership, practice, and first aid, the 27 volunteers ran organized walking groups in several residential areas. During three of seven walking campaigns the participants were followed and evaluated. The study showed that those individuals who participated one to three times a week were predominantly married women with a good health and regular physical activity. Nevertheless, more important was that one third of the participants had never been exercising regularly before. Most remarkable was to find the voluntary leaders so easily recruited and their great interest to remain as leaders for walking tours.
PubMed ID
11080601 View in PubMed
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Walking campaigns--a useful way to get people involved in physical activity? Experience from the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47948
Source
Scand J Public Health. 1999 Sep;27(3):237-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999