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Changes in predictors and status of homocysteine in young male adults after a dietary intervention with vegetables, fruits and bread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156896
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Tonje Holte Stea
Mohammad Azam Mansoor
Margareta Wandel
Solveig Uglem
Wenche Frølich
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uis.no
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bread
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Fruit
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - diet therapy
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Riboflavin - administration & dosage - blood
Treatment Outcome
Vegetables
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Elevated plasma total homocysteine (p-tHcy) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and an inverse association has been shown between the dietary intake of B-vitamins, B-vitamin profile and the concentration of p-tHcy.
The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of a dietary intervention focusing on an increased intake of vegetables, fruits and bread. The effect of the dietary intervention was determined by the changes in plasma concentrations of tHcy, cysteine (cys), riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B(12).
An intervention study with duration of 5 months, including 541 male recruits from the Norwegian National Guard, Vaernes and a control group, including 209 male recruits from the Norwegian Army, Heggelia.
The dietary intervention resulted in decreased concentration of p-tHcy (-10%, P = 0.002), p-cys (-6%, P
PubMed ID
18521531 View in PubMed
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Effect of a nutrition intervention on intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among low and high consumers in the Norwegian National Guard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275465
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solveig Uglem
Marte K Råberg Kjøllesdal
Wenche Frølich
Margareta Wandel
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread
Energy intake
Fruit
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Norway
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional information seldom reaches individuals with the most unhealthful dietary habits.
To explore whether an intervention focusing on a combination of nutritional information and increased availability of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread was effective to raise the intake, and knowledge, of these foods among recruits in the military with low as well as high baseline intake.
Intervention study, including 479 recruits, in intervention and control military camps. The participants were divided into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to their baseline intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread.
Those with low/medium baseline intake in the intervention camp had a significant increase in the intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread at follow-up. All three intake groups in the intervention camp also had significantly higher intake of these foods compared to those in the control camp at follow-up. The knowledge scores increased significantly among both high and low consumers in the intervention camp, but not in the control camp.
The intervention led to increased intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among those recruits in the intervention camp, who were most in need to change their diet.
PubMed ID
25181720 View in PubMed
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