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The A1330V polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) associates with low peak bone mass in young healthy men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165637
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Anne Saarinen
Ville-Valtteri Välimäki
Matti J Välimäki
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kirsi Auro
Piia Uusen
Mairi Kuris
Anna-Elina Lehesjoki
Outi Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics and Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Calcifediol - blood
Finland
Fractures, Bone - etiology - genetics
Gene Frequency
Humans
LDL-Receptor Related Proteins - genetics
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5
Male
Military Personnel
Osteoporosis - etiology - genetics
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Abstract
Polymorphisms in the gene coding for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) contribute to variation in bone mass in the general population. Whether this is due to influence on bone mass acquisition or on bone loss thereafter has not been established.
We studied the association of LRP5 polymorphisms with peak bone mass in young men. The study included 235 Finnish men, aged 18.3 to 20.6 years. Lifestyle factors and fracture history were recorded. Bone mineral content (BMC), density (BMD) and scan area were measured for the lumbar spine and proximal femur by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Blood and urine were collected for determination of bone turnover markers, serum 25-OHD and PTH. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for genetic analysis of LRP5. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms in LRP5 were analyzed and correlated with bone parameters.
Only the A1330V polymorphism of LRP5 significantly associated with bone parameters. In comparison with subjects with the AlaAla genotype (n=215), those with AlaVal genotype (n=20) had lower femoral neck BMC (P=0.029) and BMD (P=0.012), trochanter BMC (P=0.0067) and BMD (P=0.015), and total hip BMC (P=0.0044) and BMD (P=0.0089). Fracture history was similar for the genotypes.
The polymorphic valine variant at position 1330 of LRP5 was significantly associated with reduced BMC and BMD values in healthy young Finnish men. The results provide evidence for the crucial role of LRP5 in peak bone mass acquisition.
PubMed ID
17223614 View in PubMed
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Body composition and bone mineral density in children with premature adrenarche and the association of LRP5 gene polymorphisms with bone mineral density.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148293
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Nov;94(11):4144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Pauliina Utriainen
Jarmo Jääskeläinen
Anne Saarinen
Esko Vanninen
Outi Mäkitie
Raimo Voutilainen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatrics, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland. pauliina.utriainen@uku.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Nov;94(11):4144-51
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenarche - genetics
Body Composition
Bone Density - genetics
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Femur Neck - anatomy & histology
Finland
Humans
LDL-Receptor Related Proteins - genetics
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5
Male
Pituitary Gland - growth & development
Polymorphism, Genetic
Reference Values
Spine - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Precocious increase in adrenal androgen production is the hallmark of premature adrenarche (PA). Adrenal androgens have anabolic properties.
The objective of the study was to test whether body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) are altered in PA and study whether genetic variation in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) affects BMD in PA.
This was a cross-sectional study.
The study was conducted at a university hospital.
The study included 126 prepubertal children (64 with PA, 10 boys; 62 non-PA controls, 10 boys). Femoral neck and lumbar spine areal and calculated volumetric BMD (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), body composition (bioimpedance), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and markers of bone turnover and calcium homeostasis were compared between the PA and control groups. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of LRP5 were determined and associated with BMD.
Children with PA had higher femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD(areal) than the controls (Z-score 0.56 vs. -0.09, P
PubMed ID
19789208 View in PubMed
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FGF23 gene variation and its association with phosphate homeostasis and bone mineral density in Finnish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265785
Source
Bone. 2015 Feb;71:124-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Minna Pekkinen
Christine M Laine
Riikka Mäkitie
Eira Leinonen
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Heli Viljakainen
Outi Mäkitie
Source
Bone. 2015 Feb;71:124-30
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones - radiography
Child
Densitometry
Female
Fibroblast Growth Factors - chemistry - genetics
Finland
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Variation
Haplotypes - genetics
Homeostasis
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Phosphates - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Protein Structure, Tertiary
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone, participates in the hormonal bone-parathyroid-kidney axis, which is modulated by PTH, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, plasma phosphate (Pi), and diet. Inappropriately high serum FGF23, seen in certain genetic and acquired disorders, results in urinary phosphate wasting and impaired bone mineralization. This study investigated the impact of FGF23 gene variation on phosphate homeostasis and bone health. The study included 183 children and adolescents (110 girls) aged 7-19 years (median 13.2years). Urine and blood parameters of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were analyzed. Bone characteristics were quantified by DXA and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Genetic FGF23 variation was assessed by direct sequencing of coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Nine FGF23 polymorphisms were detected; three of them were common: rs3832879 (c.212-37insC), rs7955866 (c.716C>T, p.T239M) and rs11063112 (c.2185A>T). Four different haplotypes and six different diplotypes were observed among these three polymorphisms. The variations in FGF23 significantly associated with plasma PTH and urinary Pi excretion, even after adjusting for relevant covariates. FGF23 variations independently associated with total hip BMD Z-score, but not with other bone outcomes. In instrument analysis, genetic variance in FGF23 was considered a weak instrument as it only induced small variations in circulating FGF23, PTH and Pi concentrations (F statistic less than 10). The observed associations between FGF23 variations and circulating PTH, and Pi excretion and total hip BMD Z-scores suggest that FGF23 polymorphisms may play a role in mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism.
PubMed ID
25445451 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D binding protein genotype is associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations, as well as bone health in children and adolescents in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105061
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e87292
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Minna Pekkinen
Elisa Saarnio
Heli T Viljakainen
Elina Kokkonen
Jette Jakobsen
Kevin Cashman
Outi Mäkitie
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ; Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e87292
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones
Calcium, Dietary - metabolism
Child
Female
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Male
Parathyroid Hormone - blood - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - genetics - metabolism
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Vitamin D binding protein (DBP)/group-specific component (Gc), correlates positively with serum vitamin D metabolites, and phenotype influences serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) concentration. The protein isoform has been associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. We examined the role of GC genotypes in S-25(OH)D status and BMD in 231 Finnish children and adolescents aged 7-19 yr. BMD was measured with DXA from lumbar spine (LS), total hip, and whole body, and for 175 subjects, radial volumetric BMD was measured with pQCT. Background characteristic and total dietary intakes of vitamin D and calcium were collected. The concentrations of 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and other markers of calcium homeostasis were determined from blood and urine. Genotyping was based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs4588) in the GC gene. The genotype distribution was: GC 1/1 68%, GC 1/2 26% and GC 2/2 6%. A significant difference emerged in 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations between the genotypes, (p?=?0.001 and 0.028 respectively, ANCOVA). There was also a linear trend in: Gc 2/2 had the lowest 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations (p?=?0.025 and 0.012, respectively). Total hip bone mineral content was associated with GC genotype (BMC) (p?=?0.05, ANCOVA) in boys. In regression analysis, after adjusting for relevant covariates, GC genotype was associated with LS BMC and strength and strain index (SSI) Z-score in both genders, and LS BMD in boys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the association between GC genotypes and S-25(OH)D and PTH concentrations. The results show the influence of DBP genetic variation on bone mass accrual in adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24498064 View in PubMed
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