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Bleeding-related hospitalization in patients with von Willebrand disease and the impact of prophylaxis: Results from national registers in Sweden compared with normal controls and participants in the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296201
Source
Haemophilia. 2018 Jul; 24(4):628-633
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
E Holm
K Steen Carlsson
S Lövdahl
A E Lail
T C Abshire
E Berntorp
Author Affiliation
Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Haemophilia. 2018 Jul; 24(4):628-633
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hemorrhage - complications - prevention & control
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Registries
Sweden
von Willebrand Diseases - complications - therapy
Abstract
Patients suffering from von Willebrand disease (VWD) have a variety of bleeding symptoms and require both outpatient care for treatment and, in more severe cases, hospitalization.
To investigate the impact of having VWD on frequency of hospitalization compared to a control group and to evaluate whether regular replacement therapy (prophylaxis) is associated with reduction in the number of hospitalizations.
Linkage of national population-based registries was used in the Congenital Bleeding Disorders study in Sweden (CBDS). Data were from the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN).
The national registries contained 2790 subjects with a diagnosis of VWD between 1987 and 2009. A total of 13 920 age- and gender-matched controls were identified. There were 2.0 times (range 1.5-2.5) as many inpatient hospitalizations among subjects with VWD compared to controls. The most common causes of hospitalization were gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (n = 232 as primary diagnosis), menorrhagia (n = 198) and epistaxis (n = 192). Outpatient visits per year were also twice as common among those with VWD. From the VWD PN, 105 subjects were included (VWD type 3, 52.4%; type2A, 22.9%; type 1, 12.4% and other types, 3.9%). A total of 122 hospitalizations due to bleeding episodes, dominated by GI bleeds, were analysed. Significantly fewer hospitalizations occurred after initiation of prophylaxis (75 prior to and 45 after, P = .006).
Our study indicates that subjects with VWD have a considerably higher consumption of healthcare resources compared to controls and that initiation of prophylaxis may reduce the number of hospitalizations due to bleeding.
PubMed ID
29626372 View in PubMed
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HIV-serology and lymphocyte subsets in relation to therapy and clinical development in haemophiliacs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8556
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1988 Nov;41(5):459-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
B. Böttiger
M. Blombäck
E. Berntorp
N. Egberg
I M Nilsson
S. Schulman
L. Stigendal
G. Biberfeld
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1988 Nov;41(5):459-66
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - pathology
HIV Antibodies - analysis
HIV Antigens - analysis
HIV Core Protein p24
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Hemophilia A - complications - therapy
Humans
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retroviridae Proteins - analysis
Sweden
T-Lymphocytes - classification
von Willebrand Disease - complications - therapy
Abstract
389 Swedish patients with haemophilia A, B or von Willebrand's disease were examined for HIV-1 antibodies. T-cell subsets were measured in 260 of them. HIV-1 antibodies were found in 98 of these patients. Of the 199 patients with severe or moderate haemophilia A, 44% were seropositive. They had seroconverted between 1979 and 1983. HIV-1-seropositive patients had significantly decreased numbers of CD4 cells and increased numbers of CD8 cells. The seronegative haemophilia A patients had significantly increased numbers of CD8 cells. The T-cell subsets were followed for a median of 40 months in 73 seropositive patients. All groups of patients, at different clinical stages, showed decreasing numbers of CD4 cells. The most pronounced decrease was seen in the patients who developed AIDS, followed by the group which developed HIV-related signs or symptoms. HIV antigen in serum and antibody pattern in Western blot and ELISA were followed in 89 patients. HIV-1 antigen was present and p24 antibodies were lacking in 11% and 13% of asymptomatic subjects, in 13% and 20% of patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, in 33% and 38% of patients with other HIV-related signs or symptoms and in 5/6 of the AIDS patients, respectively. In conclusion, the decrease of CD4 cells and the presence of HIV antigen and/or absence of p24 antibodies were found to be prognostic markers for HIV disease.
PubMed ID
2905274 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C virus in Norwegians with congenital coagulation factor defects treated with plasma products from small pools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56898
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;9(8):612-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
H. Rollag
S A Evesen
S S Fröland
A. Glomstein
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bacteriology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;9(8):612-4
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation Factors - therapeutic use
Hemophilia A - complications - therapy
Hemophilia B - complications - therapy
Hepacivirus - immunology
Hepatitis Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis C - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
von Willebrand Disease - complications - therapy
Abstract
The prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in sera from 266 Norwegians with coagulation factor defects of different types and degrees of severity was assessed by an enzyme immunoassay. The overall prevalence was 41%, the highest rates being found in persons with severe hemophilia A (64%) or B (67%). These prevalence rates are below those found in hemophiliacs in most other countries in the Western hemisphere. This may be due to the strategy for coagulation factor substitution used and a favorable epidemiological situation.
PubMed ID
2170135 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of antibodies against parvovirus B19 in Norwegians with congenital coagulation factor defects treated with plasma products from small donor pools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227516
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(6):675-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H. Rollag
G. Patou
J R Pattison
M. Degré
S A Evensen
S S Fröland
A. Glomstein
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bacteriology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(6):675-9
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Biological Products - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Coagulation Disorders - complications - congenital - therapy
Erythema Infectiosum - epidemiology - etiology
Hemophilia A - complications - therapy
Hemophilia B - complications - therapy
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Parvovirus B19, Human - immunology
Prevalence
Viremia - etiology
von Willebrand Diseases - complications - therapy
Abstract
The seroprevalence of antibodies against parvovirus B19 in 308 Norwegians with coagulation factor defects of different types and severities was assessed by an IgG antibody capture radioimmunoassay (GACRIA). The overall seroprevalence was 62%. The seroprevalence among subjects with different types of coagulation factor defects was related to the type and severity of the coagulation factor defect: severe hemophilia A 64%, moderate and mild hemophilia A 58%, severe hemophilia B 88%, moderate and mild hemophilia B 73%, and von Willebrand's disease 52%. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies among household contacts and blood donors was 49% and 42% respectively. This study confirms that replacement therapy with coagulation factors is accompanied by an increased risk for acquiring parvovirus B19 infection. However, the prevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies among Norwegian hemophiliacs is well below the prevalence reported from other countries and probably reflects the small numbers of donors in plasma pools used for the preparation of coagulation factor concentrates.
PubMed ID
1815327 View in PubMed
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