Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Delayed pro-opiomelanocortin activation after ethanol intake in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11513
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Oct;18(5):1226-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
A C Ekman
O. Vakkuri
O. Vuolteenaho
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu Medical School, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Oct;18(5):1226-9
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Arousal - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Corticotropin - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Pro-Opiomelanocortin - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
To elucidate the effect of ethanol on the secretion of ACTH and beta-endorphin (BE) as the representatives of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) system, as well as cortisol as the hypophyseally regulated peripheral hormone, we measured concentrations of serum ethanol and plasma ACTH, BE, and cortisol at 1- to 4-hr intervals for 12 hr after administration of 0.5 and 1.0 g ethanol/kg of body weight and placebo drinks between 1900-1945 hr to nine healthy volunteers according to a double-blind, cross-over design. Plasma ACTH, BE, and cortisol showed an expected diurnal rhythm with the highest levels at 0700 hr. Intake of ethanol had no statistically significant effects on plasma ACTH up to 0700 hr in the morning. The higher dose caused increased levels of BE at 0100 hr and both doses at 0200 hr. Plasma cortisol at 0400 hr was higher in subjects receiving 1.0 g ethanol/kg than in those receiving placebo (p
PubMed ID
7847611 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of opioid-induced analgesia on beta-endorphin, cortisol and glucose responses in neonates with cardiorespiratory problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55055
Source
Biol Neonate. 1993;64(6):360-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M L Pokela
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Biol Neonate. 1993;64(6):360-7
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia
Apgar score
Asphyxia Neonatorum - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - therapy
Gestational Age
Heart Defects, Congenital - blood
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Infant, Newborn
Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration Disorders - blood - therapy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - blood
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
The effects of analgesia on plasma beta-endorphin (beta-E), serum cortisol and blood glucose responses were investigated in 20 distressed, mechanically ventilated neonates during the first 3 days of life. Morphine 0.1 mg/kg, meperidine 1 mg/kg or alfentanil 10 micrograms/kg were used for analgesia as clinically indicated. Plasma beta-E, serum cortisol and blood glucose were recorded before analgesia and 1 and/or 2, 12 and 24 h afterwards in the distress group and once in 20 healthy neonates (control group). beta-E, cortisol, and blood glucose before analgesia were significantly higher in the distress group than in the control group. Cortisol values had decreased significantly 2 h after analgesia and blood glucose within 12 h. Plasma beta-E values had decreased to the same level as in the controls 24 h after the start of analgesia. The results indicate that the stress response in the distressed neonates with cardiorespiratory problems, as assessed by beta-E, cortisol, and blood glucose, is attenuated by opioid medication, and it is concluded that these patients should be given adequate analgesia.
PubMed ID
8286562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inter-relationships between pituitary-adrenal hormones and catecholamines during a 6-day Nordic ski race.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11939
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;64(3):258-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
N. Fellmann
M. Bedu
G. Boudet
M. Mage
M. Sagnol
J M Pequignot
B. Claustrat
J. Brun
L. Peyrin
J. Coudert
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Physiologie-Biologie du Sport, Faculté de Médecine, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;64(3):258-65
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - blood
Adult
Catecholamines - blood
Corticotropin - blood
Epinephrine - blood
Exercise - physiology
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Norepinephrine - blood
Pituitary Hormones - blood
Skiing
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the inter-relationships between pituitary-adrenal hormones and catecholamines during a prolonged competition over 6 days. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol (C), beta-endorphin (beta EP), free and sulphated adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were measured in 11 volunteer male subjects during a national Nordic-ski race (323 km). Blood samples were obtained before the competition in the evening as control (D0), and before and after each day's racing (D1-D6). The mean daily heart rate (fc) was calculated from fc values recorded every minute during the race. The results showed the following: changes in mean fc [from 147 (SEM 3) to 156 (SEM 3) beats.min-1 according to the day] were not significant during the race. Diurnal variations in ACTH, beta EP and C were no longer apparent after the race: evening levels were higher than their respective D0 values during the race, except on D3 when there was a lack of response to exercise in the three hormones. Unlike ACTH and beta EP, pre- and postexercise C values on D1 and D2 were higher than those on the subsequent days (P less than 0.001). In contrast, there was a progressive accumulation of A and NA in pre- and postrace concentrations which reached a plateau in about 4 days. Positive correlations between exercise responses in ACTH, C and beta EP were found especially on D3 and D6 (P less than 0.001) but there were no significant correlations between catecholamines and the other three hormones. Thus, prolonged competition over 6 days evoked different control mechanisms for hormones of the pituitary-adrenal axis and catecholamines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1314173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neuroendocrine responses to psychological workload of instrument flying in student pilots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10659
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Jun;70(6):565-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
T K Leino
J. Leppäluoto
A. Ruokonen
P. Kuronen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Jun;70(6):565-70
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Aviation - education - instrumentation
Corticotropin - blood
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Processes - physiology
Military Personnel - education - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Neurosecretory Systems - metabolism
Norepinephrine - blood
Prolactin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - blood - etiology - psychology
Students - psychology
Workload - psychology
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Information processing and stress tolerance are necessary features for instrument flying (IFR), especially among student pilots. Psychological workload of IFR flight may lead to stress reactions such as neuroendocrine activity. METHODS: Neuroendocrine responses to an IFR flight with Vinka piston-engined primary trainer were studied in 35 male volunteers who participated in the basic military flying course of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). The student pilots performed a 40-min IFR flight mission and a control session on land in randomized order between 11.00 h and 15.00 h. The IFR flight included 3 NDB approaches and was evaluated by flight instructors. Blood samples were collected 15 min before, 5 min and 60 min after the flight as well as control session, and. Plasma ACTH, beta3-endorphin (BE), cortisol, prolactin, adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were measured. Psychological evaluations included psychomotor test (Wiener), Multi Coordination and Attention Test, ability tests and personality tests (CMPS and 16 PF). The overall psychological evaluation was made by an aviation psychologist. RESULTS: Plasma ACTH was significantly higher before and 5 min after the flight compared with control levels, but plasma BE increased significantly only before the flight. Plasma cortisol was significantly elevated before and 5 min after the flight. Plasma prolactin, NA and A increases were significant 5 min after the flight. High A levels after the flight correlated significantly with poor IFR flight performance as well as with poor psychomotor test results. CONCLUSIONS: The plasma prolactin and NA increases after the flight represented a direct type of stress reaction to the flight situation. The plasma BE response to IFR flight was an anticipatory stress reaction, but plasma ACTH, cortisol and A responses included both anticipatory and direct types of stress reactions. Psychological factors, flight performance and neuroendocrine responses to IFR flight appear to be associated with each other. Therefore, neuroendocrine reactions as a response to the psychological workload of military flying could be used for identifying stress tolerance in military pilots.
PubMed ID
10373047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neuroendocrine responses to real and simulated BA Hawk MK 51 flight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215938
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Feb;66(2):108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
T. Leino
J. Leppäluoto
P. Huttunen
A. Ruokonen
P. Kuronen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Feb;66(2):108-13
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Analysis of Variance
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Aviation
Catecholamines - blood
Environment, Controlled
Finland
Hormones - blood
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Neuropeptides - blood
Stress, Psychological - blood
Workload - psychology
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
The effects of psychological workload on the plasma levels of eight neuroendocrine hormones were studied in 5 undergraduate and 5 senior military pilots of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). All subjects performed the same short-term basic flight mission, which included the following: 1) start; 2) ILS-approach in minimum weather conditions; 3) visual approach; and 4) landing. The mission was performed twice: first with the BA Hawk MK 51 simulator with minimal G-forces and after that with a BA Hawk MK 51 jet trainer with Gz-forces below +2. Blood samples were collected 30 min before and 10 min after the mission and were measured for adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, prolactin, vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and cortisol. The plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol did not change significantly in response to simulated or real flight. Plasma prolactin levels increased significantly (p = 0.037) in all subjects after the mission performed with jet trainer, and the increase was especially great in cadets. However, the same mission performed with the simulator did not raise plasma prolactin levels. This finding suggests that the psychological workload in a flight simulator does not correspond to the psychological workload in a real jet trainer, at least not in basic flying. Plasma AVP increased significantly (p = 0.032) after the mission performed with the simulator in cadets; this increase can be described as a "first-time effect." Plasma ANP also increased significantly (p
PubMed ID
7726772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pain relief can reduce hypoxemia in distressed neonates during routine treatment procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59410
Source
Pediatrics. 1994 Mar;93(3):379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M L Pokela
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatrics. 1994 Mar;93(3):379-83
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anoxemia - prevention & control
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Meperidine - therapeutic use
Oxygen - blood
Pain - drug therapy - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - blood - therapy
Stress - etiology - prevention & control
Suction - adverse effects
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To determine whether the use of opioids could reduce the hypoxemia and hemodynamic instability associated with routine intensive care procedures in neonates with respiratory distress. DESIGN. Randomized and placebo-controlled study. METHODS. Physiological, plasma beta-endorphin, cortisol, and glucose responses to routine treatment procedures were studied in 84 mechanically ventilated distressed neonates randomized into groups receiving 1 mg/kg meperidine or 0.9% saline 15 minutes before tracheal suction or routine nursing care. RESULTS. The duration of hypoxemia (transcutaneous partial pressure of O2
PubMed ID
8115195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physiological changes, plasma beta-endorphin and cortisol responses to tracheal intubation in neonates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59417
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Feb;83(2):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
M L Pokela
M. Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Feb;83(2):151-6
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alfentanil
Analgesia
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Drug Therapy, Combination
Glycopyrrolate - therapeutic use
Heart rate
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Infant, Newborn
Intubation, Intratracheal - adverse effects
Meperidine
Oxygen - blood
Premedication
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Succinylcholine
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
Physiological, plasma beta-endorphin and cortisol responses to nasotracheal intubation were studied in 20 distressed infants of median age 0.3 days (range 0.1-23 days) randomized into groups given pethidine 1 mg/kg (n = 10) or alfentanil 20 micrograms/kg plus suxamethonium 1.5 mg/kg (n = 10) before intubation. All of the infants were given glycopyrrolate 3-5 micrograms/kg. Hypoxaemia during intubation was found in all 10 infants in the pethidine group and in 7 of 10 infants in the alfentanil-suxamethonium group, its duration being significantly longer in the pethidine group and being associated with the duration of the intubation procedure. Blood pressure increased, but not statistically significantly, in all except 2 patients in the alfentanil-suxamethonium group and bradycardia appeared in 1 patient in each group. Plasma beta-endorphin and cortisol values did not show any statistically significant intra-group or inter-group differences. Newborn infants suffer from hypoxaemia during intubation when awake more and therefore need adequate premedication before elective intubation. One alternative is the combination of glycopyrrolate, alfentanil and suxamethonium described here, although the ideal medication and dosage still remain to be defined.
PubMed ID
8193492 View in PubMed
Less detail

Plasma levels of beta-endorphin, prolactin and gonadotropins in male athletes after an international nordic ski race.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50362
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1988;57(4):425-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C. Mougin
M T Henriet
A. Baulay
D. Haton
S. Berthelay
R C Gaillard
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculté de Médecine, Besançon, France.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1988;57(4):425-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Gonadotropins - blood
Humans
Male
Osmolar Concentration
Physical Education and Training
Physical Endurance
Prolactin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
Plasma beta-endorphin, prolactin (PRL), FSH and LH were measured in 17 volunteer male subjects at rest and under the stress caused by a long-distance nordic ski race. The race induced increased levels of beta-endorphin and PRL in all skiers. The changes in PRL with exercise were significantly related to the changes in beta-endorphin (r = 0.69, p less than 0.001). Furthermore, the highly trained skiers training over 150 km.week-1 of nordic ski showed consistently higher post-exercise beta-endorphin and PRL levels than the moderately trained skiers who trained for 20 km.week-1. In addition the race induced slight falls in FSH and LH; however plasma gonadotropin levels did not show any correlation with plasma beta-endorphin concentrations and did not differ between the two groups of skiers. These results suggest that endogenous opioid peptides may modulate PRL secretion in heavy exercise, since they are of minor importance in the release of FSH and LH in such a situation. The observations also suggest that the degree of previous training and the exercise intensity do seem to be responsible for the hormonal changes.
PubMed ID
2969335 View in PubMed
Less detail

Stress hormones after prolonged physical training in normo- and hypobaric conditions in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11453
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):73-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
M. Perhonen
T. Takala
P. Huttunen
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):73-7
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Anoxia - blood
Corticosterone - blood
Corticotropin - blood
Dopamine - blood
Epinephrine - blood
Male
Norepinephrine - blood
Physical Conditioning, Animal - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Pituitary-Adrenal System - physiology
Pressure
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Stress - blood - physiopathology
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
In order to study the long-term effects of prolonged physical training in hypobaric hypoxia on plasma stress hormone concentrations, male rats (N = 84) were exposed to progressive running training on a motordriven treadmill for 10, 21 or 56 days, twice a day and 5 days a week either in hypobaric hypoxic (O2-pressure 740-770 mbar) or in normobaric conditions. The plasma samples were taken 14-16 hours after the last exercise bout. Plasma corticosterone concentration was higher in animals trained 10 days in hypobaric conditions than in those trained in normobaric conditions (1127 +/- 158 nmol/l and 710 +/- 87 nmol/l, p
PubMed ID
7751079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vehicle injuries to joggers. Case report and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223138
Source
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1992 Sep;32(3):321-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1992 Sep;32(3):321-31
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Dangerous Behavior
Euphoria
Humans
Jogging - injuries
Male
Ontario
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
A medico-legal case is presented where a jogger was struck by a car while crossing an intersection and later sought major damages in a civil court. This incident is reviewed in the context of overall information on injury to joggers by vehicles, and the possibility (raised by the defendant's counsel) that the euphoria generated by prolonged exercise may have created a sense of "invincibility" that predisposed the jogger to reckless actions. The defendants argued that the young man concerned was taking an amount of exercise that could have led to a jogging addiction and alteration of consciousness in a susceptible individual, and a history of alcohol, drug and video addiction was advanced as evidence that he may indeed have been a susceptible person. During the actual incident, the jogger recognised that the driver of the vehicle had not seen him, but nevertheless he proceeded to enter a crosswalk that had already been 75% traversed by the car, leaving himself only 0.6 metres of space, a half of the lane width normally required by a runner. A calculation of the relative velocities of the car and the jogger suggests that the latter must have veered 1-2 metres onto the main highway in order to pass in front of the care and be hit from the side. The behaviour of the jogger was plainly reckless, but more information is needed on the relative incidence of traffic injuries in joggers and walkers, on the prevalence of jogging addiction, and on diagnostic criteria for this condition before the accident could be categorically attributed to a jogging-related euphoria.
PubMed ID
1487926 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.