Skip header and navigation

Refine By

55 records – page 1 of 6.

The Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276361
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir Bjørklund
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Fatty Acids, Essential - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Selenium - administration & dosage
Survival Rate
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Ubiquinone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) was a clinical study carried out in Denmark in the 1990s with 32 typical patients with breast cancer, aged 32-81 yr and classified high risk because of tumor spread to the lymph nodes. The patients received standard therapy for their breast cancer, but got from the start additionally an adjuvant therapy in form of a cocktail consisting of vitamin C (2,850 mg/day), vitamin E (2,500 IU/day), beta-carotene (32.5 IU/day), selenium (Se; 387 micrograms/day), various other vitamins and essential trace elements, essential fatty acids (1.2 g gamma-linolenic acid/day and 3.5 g omega-3 PUFAs/day), and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 90 mg/day). The protocol was later changed, with reduction of the Se intake and more coenzyme Q10 than when the study was started. The average survival of high-risk breast patients in the study was 50% after 5 yr, whereas for low-risk breast cancer patients (without metastases in the axilla when treatment was started), the average survival was 90% after ten years. The main investigator died, and the final report from the ANICA study was therefore never written. However, the published preliminary results from the trial were very promising; it seems, therefore, important to follow-up this study.
PubMed ID
26473998 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant intake and allergic disease in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120524
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
H. Rosenlund
J. Magnusson
I. Kull
N. Håkansson
A. Wolk
G. Pershagen
M. Wickman
A. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Helen.Rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Magnesium - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Male
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
Antioxidant intake may reduce the risk of allergic disease by protecting against oxidative tissue damage. Major sources of antioxidants in the Western world are fruits, vegetables (vitamin C, ß-carotene, a-tocopherol), meat and milk (selenium, magnesium, zinc). Children may exclude or eat less of some fruits and vegetables due to cross-reactivity between pollen and these foods, complicating assessment of causal relationships.
To investigate the association between dietary antioxidant intake and allergic disease, taking potential reverse causation into account.
Data on 2442 8-year-old children from the Swedish birth cohort study BAMSE were analysed. Children with completed parental questionnaires on exposures and health, including a food-frequency questionnaire and who provided a blood sample were included. Associations between antioxidant intake during the past year and current allergic disease were analysed using logistic regression.
An inverse association was observed between intake of ß-carotene and rhinitis (OR(adj), highest vs. lowest quartile, 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). Magnesium intake was inversely related to asthma (OR(adj), 0.65, 95% CI 0.42-1.00) and atopic sensitisation (OR(adj), 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-1.00). Following exclusion of children who avoided certain fruits, vegetables or milk due to allergic symptoms (n = 285), the inverse association remained between magnesium intake and asthma (OR(adj), 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.98), whereas all other associations became non-significant.
Diet modifications due to allergy may affect the antioxidant intake and needs to be considered when investigating the relationship between diet and allergic disease. Magnesium intake seems to have a protective effect on childhood asthma.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1420-222994339
PubMed ID
22994346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidants and cancers of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20316
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2000
Author
P. Terry
J. Lagergren
W. Ye
O. Nyrén
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Date
Sep-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardia - drug effects - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Drug Synergism
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Antioxidant vitamins have attracted considerable attention in previous studies of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, but dietary studies of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia remain sparse. Treating these tumors as distinct diseases, we studied intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with 185, 165, and 258 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 815 controls. Subjects with a high parallel intake of vitamin C, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol showed a 40-50% decreased risk of both histological types of esophageal cancer compared with subjects with a low parallel intake. Antioxidant intake was not associated with the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Separately, vitamin C and beta-carotene reduced the risk of esophageal cancers more than alpha-tocopherol. We found that antioxidant intake is associated with similar risk reductions for both main histological types of esophageal cancer. Our findings indicate that antioxidants do not explain the diverging incidence rates of the 2 histological types of esophageal cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that inverse associations with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be stronger among subjects under presumed higher oxidative stress due to smoking or gastroesophageal reflux, respectively. Our results may be relevant for the implementation of focused, cost-effective preventive measures.
PubMed ID
10925371 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant vitamin intake and mortality in three Central and Eastern European urban populations: the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278739
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Urszula Stepaniak
Agnieszka Micek
Giuseppe Grosso
Denes Stefler
Roman Topor-Madry
Ruzena Kubinova
Sofia Malyutina
Anne Peasey
Hynek Pikhart
Yuri Nikitin
Martin Bobak
Andrzej Pajak
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Poland - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between individual-level dietary intakes of antioxidant vitamins C, E and beta-carotene with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in three Central and Eastern European (CEE) populations.
Data from the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe cohort study were used. At the baseline survey, between 2002 and 2005, 28,945 men and women aged 45-69 years were examined in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and seven Czech towns. Deaths in the cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between vitamin consumption and all-cause, cardiovascular (CVD) disease and cancer mortality.
In multivariable-adjusted analyses, there were no clear inverse associations between antioxidant vitamin intakes and mortality, although in some groups, several hazard ratios (HRs) were significant. For example, in men, compared with the lowest quintile of vitamin C intake, all-cause mortality in the third and fourth quintiles was lower by 28 % (HR 0.72; 95 % CI 0.61-0.85) and by 20 % (HR 0.80; 95 % CI 0.68-0.95), respectively. CVD mortality was lower by 35 % (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.50-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.59-0.99) in third and fourth quintile of vitamin C intake, respectively. In women, the third and fourth quintiles of dietary intake of vitamin E were associated with reduced risk of all-cause death by 33 % (HR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.53-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.61-0.97), respectively. Consumption of vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene was not related to CVD mortality in women and to cancer mortality in either gender.
This large prospective cohort study in CEE populations with low prevalence of vitamin supplementation did not find a strong, dose-response evidence for protective effects of antioxidant vitamin intake.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Apr;29(2):260-510817122
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Oct;17(10):2278-8623987990
Cites: Nutrition. 2000 Sep;16(9):785-610978865
Cites: J Nutr. 2002 Apr;132(4):756-6111925473
Cites: J Intern Med. 2002 May;251(5):372-9211982737
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2002 Aug;61(3):397-40012230799
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2003 Feb;22(1):18-3512569111
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;77(6):1390-912791615
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):999-101014594788
Cites: Lancet. 2004 May 22;363(9422):1724-715158637
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 May 20;328(20):1444-98479463
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1994 Sep 21;86(18):1390-78072032
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Dec 15;142(12):1269-787503047
Cites: Radiat Res. 1996 May;145(5):532-418619018
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 1;144(5):501-118781466
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Apr;65(4 Suppl):1220S-1228S; discussion 1229S-1231S9094926
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 15;160(12):1223-3315583375
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1508-2015585762
Cites: Free Radic Res. 2005 Jul;39(7):671-8616036346
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:25517049075
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun;85(6):1634-4217556703
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2008;23(1):3-1017955332
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Feb;138(2):344-5018203902
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2008 May;47 Suppl 2:3-1818458831
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:43919951409
Cites: Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2009;60(3):275-820063699
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102 Suppl 1:S10-3720100364
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2011 Mar 1;128(5):1169-7820473915
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2011 Jan;105(1):123-3220807458
Cites: Stroke. 2011 Jun;42(6):1665-7221512181
Cites: Curr Aging Sci. 2011 Jul;4(2):158-7021235492
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 2011 Sep 1;51(5):1000-1321664268
Cites: Ann Agric Environ Med. 2012;19(2):181-9222742786
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2012 Sep;51(6):637-6322684631
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):824-4022995736
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):706-2123638931
Cites: Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2013;18:1017-2923747864
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e6585623762441
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e7455824040282
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):297-30324227051
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:83184124804252
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Dec;68(12):1346-5225028084
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Aug;72(2):476-8310919944
PubMed ID
25762013 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carotenoid content of pandanus fruit cultivars and other foods of the Republic of Kiribati.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167825
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Aug;9(5):631-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Lois Englberger
William Aalbersberg
Usaia Dolodolotawake
Joseph Schierle
Julia Humphries
Tinai Iuta
Geoffrey C Marks
Maureen H Fitzgerald
Betarim Rimon
Mamarau Kaiririete
Author Affiliation
Island Food Community of Pohnpei, Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Aug;9(5):631-43
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - analysis - therapeutic use
Biological Availability
Carotenoids - administration & dosage - analysis - metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Health Food
Health promotion
Humans
Micronesia
Nutritive Value
Pandanaceae - chemistry
Pigmentation
Public Health
Vitamin A - analysis - therapeutic use
Vitamin A Deficiency - diet therapy - prevention & control
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Kiribati, a remote atoll island country of the Pacific, has serious problems of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Thus, it is important to identify locally grown acceptable foods that might be promoted to alleviate this problem. Pandanus fruit (Pandanus tectorius) is a well-liked indigenous Kiribati food with many cultivars that have orange/yellow flesh, indicative of carotenoid content. Few have been previously analysed.
This study was conducted to identify cultivars of pandanus and other foods that could be promoted to alleviate VAD in Kiribati.
Ethnography was used to select foods and assess acceptability factors. Pandanus and other foods were analysed for beta- and alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and total carotenoids using high-performance liquid chromatography.
Of the nine pandanus cultivars investigated there was a great range of provitamin A carotenoid levels (from 62 to 19,086 microg beta-carotene/100 g), generally with higher levels in those more deeply coloured. Seven pandanus cultivars, one giant swamp taro (Cyrtosperma chamissonis) cultivar and native fig (Ficus tinctoria) had significant provitamin A carotenoid content, meeting all or half of estimated daily vitamin A requirements within normal consumption patterns. Analyses in different laboratories confirmed high carotenoid levels in pandanus but showed that there are still questions as to how high the levels might be, owing to variation arising from different handling/preparation/analytical techniques.
These carotenoid-rich acceptable foods should be promoted for alleviating VAD in Kiribati and possibly other Pacific contexts where these foods are important. Further research in the Pacific is needed to identify additional indigenous foods with potential health benefits.
PubMed ID
16923295 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carotenoid Intake and Serum Concentration in Young Finnish Children and Their Relation with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297466
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-17-2018
Author
Marianne Prasad
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Liisa Uusitalo
Heli Tapanainen
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Georg Alfthan
Iris Erlund
Suvi Ahonen
Mari Åkerlund
Jorma Toppari
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health Solutions, The National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. marianne.prasad@thl.fi.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Date
Oct-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Carotenoids - administration & dosage - blood
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Infant
Male
Vegetables
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases. These foods are the main dietary source of carotenoids. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between dietary intake and serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene in a sample of young Finnish children from the population-based birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The current analysis comprised 3-day food records and serum samples from 207 children aged 1, 2 and 3 years. Spearman and partial correlations, as well as a cross-classification analyses, were used to assess the relationship between dietary intake and the corresponding biomarkers. Serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene were significantly higher among the 1-year-old compared to the 3-year-old children. Dietary intakes of a- and ß-carotene correlated significantly with their respective serum concentrations in all age groups, the association being highest at the age of 1 year (a-carotene r = 0.48; p
PubMed ID
30336644 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a comprehensive dietary antioxidant index and application to lung cancer risk in a cohort of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179406
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jul 1;160(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2004
Author
Margaret E Wright
Susan T Mayne
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Zhaohai Li
Pirjo Pietinen
Philip R Taylor
Jarmo Virtamo
Demetrius Albanes
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. wrighmar@mail.nih.gov
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jul 1;160(1):68-76
Date
Jul-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
In many observational studies, a higher intake of individual antioxidants is inversely associated with lung cancer risk. Data from in vitro and animal experiments suggest that there are biochemical interactions among antioxidant nutrients; therefore, consideration of multiple antioxidants simultaneously may be important in terms of risk estimation. The authors constructed a dietary antioxidant index and evaluated its ability to predict lung cancer risk within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort. At baseline (1985-1988), 27,111 Finnish male smokers aged 50-69 years completed a dietary questionnaire that assessed usual frequency of consumption and portion sizes for the previous 12 months. A total of 1,787 incident cases of lung cancer were identified during a follow-up period of up to 14.4 years (1985-1999). Principal components analyses were individually applied to the carotenoid, flavonoid, and vitamin E nutrient groups, and summation of retained principal component scores, plus selenium and vitamin C, yielded the composite antioxidant index. In multivariate proportional hazards models, the relative risks for lung cancer according to increasing quintiles of the antioxidant index were 1.00 (referent), 1.00 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 1.14), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.05), 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.92), and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.98) (p for trend = 0.002). These findings support the hypothesis that a combination of dietary antioxidants reduces lung cancer risk in male smokers.
PubMed ID
15229119 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer among Finnish male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140601
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Dec;21(12):2223-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
T. Hirvonen
J. Kontto
M. Jestoi
L. Valsta
K. Peltonen
P. Pietinen
S M Virtanen
H. Sinkko
C. Kronberg-Kippilä
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Food Safety Authority, Risk Assessment Unit, Mustialankatu 3, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland. terohirvonen69@gmail.com
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Dec;21(12):2223-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aged
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Placebos
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
To assess the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer among male smokers.
The study consisted of 27,111 male smokers, aged 50-69 years, without history of cancer. They were participants of the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study in Finland. The men completed a validated dietary questionnaire and a questionnaire on general background characteristics (including smoking habits) at baseline. Incident cases of cancer were identified through the national Finnish Cancer Registry.
During an average 10.2 year follow-up, 1,703 lung cancers, 799 prostate cancers, 365 urothelial cancers, 316 colorectal cancers, 224 stomach cancers, 192 pancreatic cancers, 184 renal cell cancers, and 175 lymphomas were diagnosed. Dietary acrylamide intake was positively associated with the risk of lung cancer; relative risk (RR) in the highest versus the lowest quintile in the multivariable-adjusted model was 1.18 ((95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.38, p for trend 0.11). Other cancers were not associated with acrylamide intake.
High acrylamide intake is associated with increased risk of lung cancer but not with other cancers in male smokers.
Notes
Cites: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2004 Apr;39(2):150-715041146
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2003 Nov;41(11):1581-612963011
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Sep;128(3):655-662458036
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-108205268
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):169-7316003738
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2005 Dec;88(2):311-816141435
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):467-7116003724
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Feb;51(2):239-4717230586
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2007 Mar;28(3):519-2817234719
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2007 Sep;389(1):119-3717673989
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Nov;16(11):2304-1318006919
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Apr;46(4):1360-417905504
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2008 May 1;122(9):2094-10018183576
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;62(3):314-2317356560
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 May;87(5):1428-3818469268
Cites: J Chromatogr Sci. 2008 Aug;46(7):659-6318718145
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Nov;138(11):2229-3618936224
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Mar 1;124(5):1196-919048629
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb 1;169(3):376-8119015201
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Mar;18(3):994-719223560
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr 15;169(8):954-6119224978
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 May 15;124(10):2384-9019142870
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2009 May 6;101(9):651-6219401552
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 May;18(5):1663-619383886
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jun;18(6):1939-4119505926
Cites: Nat Prod Rep. 2009 Aug;26(8):1001-4319636448
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2009;61(5):680-619838942
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2010 Jul;122(1):199-21019949857
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Oct;19(10):2503-1520693310
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Nov;12(9):789-9611714106
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2002;41(4):381-812234031
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2003 Nov;41(11):1569-7912963010
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jul;124(1):17-273521261
PubMed ID
20859673 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary and other methyl-group availability factors and pancreatic cancer risk in a cohort of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195151
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):680-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2001
Author
R Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
P. Pietinen
M J Barrett
P R Taylor
J. Virtamo
D. Albanes
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Studies Branch, Division of Clinical Science, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. rs221z@nih.gov
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):680-7
Date
Apr-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Probability
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Rate
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
The authors examined prospectively whether dietary folate and other factors known to influence methyl-group availability were associated with the development of exocrine pancreatic cancer within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort. Of the 27,101 healthy male smokers aged 50--69 years who completed a self-administered dietary questionnaire at baseline, 157 developed pancreatic cancer during up to 13 years of follow-up from 1985 to 1997. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The adjusted hazards ratio comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of dietary folate intake was 0.52 (95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.87; p-trend = 0.05). Dietary methionine, alcohol intake, and smoking history did not modify this relation. No significant associations were observed between dietary methionine, vitamins B(6) and B(12), or alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Consistent with prior studies, this study shows that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk (highest compared with lowest quintile, cigarettes per day: hazards ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 3.03; p-trend = 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that dietary folate intake is inversely associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and confirm the risk associated with greater cigarette smoking.
PubMed ID
11282796 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary carotenoids and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188415
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Oct;76(4):883-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Paul Terry
Meera Jain
Anthony B Miller
Geoffrey R Howe
Thomas E Rohan
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. pterry@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Oct;76(4):883-8
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Lutein - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Xanthophylls
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Abstract
Many studies of fruit and vegetable consumption showed inverse associations with breast cancer risk, suggesting the potential importance of carotenoids (and other phytochemicals) contained in these foods. To date, however, only one prospective cohort study has examined dietary carotenoids other than beta-carotene in relation to breast cancer risk.
Our aim was to examine the relations between dietary intakes of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein + zeaxanthin and breast cancer risk in a large cohort study of Canadian women.
A case-cohort analysis was undertaken in a cohort of 56 837 women who were enrolled in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study and who completed a self-administered dietary questionnaire. During follow-up to the end of 1993 a total of 1589 women were diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed incident breast cancer. For comparison, a subcohort of 5681 women was randomly selected. After exclusions for various reasons, the analyses were based on 1452 cases and 5239 noncases.
We found no clear association between intakes of any of the studied carotenoids and breast cancer risk in the study population as a whole or in subgroups defined by smoking status; relative body weight (assessed by body mass index); intakes of total fat, energy, alcohol, or folic acid; family history of breast cancer; or menopausal status.
Our data do not support any association between dietary intakes of the studied carotenoids and breast cancer risk. However, prospective cohort studies of carotenoids in relation to breast cancer are scarce and further studies are warranted.
PubMed ID
12324304 View in PubMed
Less detail

55 records – page 1 of 6.