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460 records – page 1 of 46.

[A case of tominxocosis in a 3 years and 7 months old child]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16349
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1966 May-Jun;3:30
Publication Type
Article

[Actual problems of creation of informational-analytical system for rapid control of epidemics of infectious diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127296
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
B V Boev
T A Semenenko
V M Bondarenko
A L Gintsburg
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):37-42
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Atlases as Topic
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Data Mining
Epidemics - prevention & control
Forecasting
Humans
Information Systems
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses - epidemiology - microbiology - virology
Abstract
Structure and modules of computer informational-analytical system "Electronic atlas of Russia" is presented, the object of mapping in this system is epidemiology of socially significant infectious diseases. Systemic information on processes of emergence and spread of socially significant infectious diseases (anthroponoses, zoonoses and sapronoses) in the population of Russian Federation is presented in the atlas. Detailed electronic maps of country territory filled with prognosis-analytical information created by using technological achievements of mathematic and computer modeling of epidemics and outbreaks of viral and bacterial infections are of particular interest. Atlas allows to objectively evaluate the pattern of infection spread, prepare prognoses of epidemic and outbreak developments taking into account the implementation of control measures (vaccination, prophylaxis, diagnostics and therapy) and evaluate their economic effectiveness.
PubMed ID
22308725 View in PubMed
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African pygmy hedgehog--associated Salmonella tilene in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206677
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Sep 1;23(17):129-31; discussion 131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1997

Alaria alata Mesocercariae among Feral Cats and Badgers, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273160
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Oct;21(10):1872-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Nao Takeuchi-Storm
Mohammed N S Al-Sabi
Stig M Thamsborg
Heidi L Enemark
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Oct;21(10):1872-4
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cats - parasitology
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Mustelidae - parasitology
Sus scrofa - parasitology
Swine - parasitology
Trematoda - pathogenicity
Zoonoses - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Notes
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Cites: Vet Parasitol. 2005 Sep 5;132(1-2):167-7116081220
Cites: Parasitol Res. 2010 Jun;107(1):213-2020405145
Cites: J Parasitol. 1987 Feb;73(1):110-53572644
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2013 Dec;30(12):2725-924132122
Cites: J Feline Med Surg. 2011 Apr;13(4):300-321334238
Cites: Mol Biochem Parasitol. 1992 Sep;54(2):165-731435857
PubMed ID
26402302 View in PubMed
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Alaskan Hematophagous insects, their feeding habits and potential as vectors of pathogenic organisms. II: The feeding habits and colonization of subarctic mosquitoes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298784
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1965
the vicinity of the tower, both from vegetation and aerially up to height of 6 feet. Only six showed evidence of a recent blood meal. Evidence indicates that most sub- arctic mosquitoes take but one blood meal, a fact of considerable importance when considering them as vectors of zoonoses. Studies
  1 document  
Author
Hopla, Cluff E.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Date
July 1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9571565
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Insects
Mosquitoes
Diphtheria
Host preference
Zoonoses
Haematophagus arthropods
Abstract
Feeding habits of mosquitoes of the taiga and tundra were studied. Greater emphasis was given to those of the taiga, however, because of the longer mosquito season and the greater variety of genera and species present. Using an exposed area of human forearm (54 square inches) and a similar area of shaved rabbit abdomen, biting records were compiled. Mosquitoes were collected by aspirator after the proboscis was fully inserted. Twice as many mosquitoes were collected from the human as from the rabbit, with Aedes excrucians, A. punctor, A. intrudens and A. pionips predominating in the order given. A tower was built, with platforms at 6-foot intervals up to 42 feet, to study vertical distribution and host preference. Domestic chickens, white laboratory rabbits and varying hares, along with empty control boxes, were placed at the various heights. Approximately 80% of the 10,722 specimens obtained were collected in the first 18 feet. The percentages of mosquitoes that were engorged when collected from the bait boxes were as follows: chickens, 18.2%; white rabbits, 70%; and varying hares, 92%. Through field observations and laboratory studies, small rodents (microtines) and passerine birds are not thought significant sources of blood meals, but hares, ground squirrels and larger mammals are. Using insect nets, 46,123 specimens were collected in the vicinity of the tower, both from vegetation and aerially up to height of 6 feet. Only six showed evidence of a recent blood meal. Evidence indicates that most subarctic mosquitoes take but one blood meal, a fact of considerable importance when considering them as vectors of zoonoses. Studies of the natural history of Culiseta alaskaensis indicated that the unfed adult females overwinter close to the ground in dense growths of grass underneath the snow cover where the temperature range is from 16-20° F. In the laboratory, C. alaskaensis lived only about one week at 0° F. Chromatographic studies did not reveal the presence of glycerol compounds in the hemolymph.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-12 vol.2
Documents
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Alveolar hydatid disease. Review of the surgical experience in 42 cases of active disease among Alaskan Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4087
Source
Ann Surg. 1995 Mar;221(3):315-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
J F Wilson
R L Rausch
F R Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 1995 Mar;221(3):315-23
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Child
Dogs
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Foxes
Humans
Inuits
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Alveoli
Rodentia
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The authors reviewed the pathophysiology and clinical management of endemic alveolar hydatid disease in Alaskan Eskimos, incorporating recent developments in diagnosis and treatment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Alveolar hydatid disease is a highly lethal zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. This cestode is restricted geographically to northern climates, where foxes and small rodents represent the natural hosts. Domestic dogs also may serve as definitive hosts, and thus, transmit the parasite to humans. Human infection is characterized by the development of a cancer-like hepatic mass, which may extend to adjacent structures or metastasize to distant sites. If the infection goes untreated, mortality reaches 80%. METHODS: The medical records of all patients with alveolar hydatid disease diagnosed or treated at the Alaska Native Medical Center between 1951 and 1993 were reviewed. Forty-two cases of active disease are presented. RESULTS: Nine patients underwent resection of hepatic lesions with intent to cure, and each had a favorable result. Average post-diagnosis survival of those patients was 22 years; six still are living and free of disease. Partial resections or drainage procedures were performed in ten patients. Chemotherapy was used to augment the surgical treatment of eight patients, and four received chemotherapy alone, resulting in improved outcomes compared with historic controls. Late complications included hepatic abscess, biliary obstruction, and portal venous hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Whereas alveolar hydatid disease rarely is encountered in other areas of North America, the biologic potential for spread of the disease may be increasing because of illegal importation of infected foxes to the Eastern seaboard. Therefore, the surgical community should maintain an awareness of the diagnosis and management of this potentially devastating parasitic infection.
PubMed ID
7717785 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of outbreak of anthrax in Omsk region in 2010].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118862
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
A N Kulichenko
A G Riazanova
Iu V Demina
A S Kriga
E I Eremenko
O I Tsygankova
E A Tsygankova
N P Buravtseva
L Iu Aksenova
T M Golovinskaia
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthrax - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Bacillus anthracis - genetics - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Horse Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Horses
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Russia - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Carrying out analysis of epizootologic-epidemiologic situation on anthrax that had emerged in Omsk region in 2010 when horse meat from epizootic focus of anthrax was used in production of meat semi-finished products.
Study of samples for detection of anthrax causative agents and strain identification was performed according to guidelines 1.3.2569-09. Strain genotyping was performed by MLVA method.
The epizootologic-epidemiologic investigation performed allowed to detect the causes of emergence of anthrax outbreak, its routes and factors of transmission. MLVA genotyping results gave evidence on the single origin of Bacillus anthracis strains isolated from sick animals, humans and food substances.
Timely execution of a complex of epizootic and epidemic control measures allowed to localize epizootic and epidemic focus of anthrax as well as prevent a possible large scale development of epidemic complications.
PubMed ID
23163033 View in PubMed
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Analysis of simultaneous space-time clusters of Campylobacter spp. in humans and in broiler flocks using a multiple dataset approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140580
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Malin E Jonsson
Berit Tafjord Heier
Madelaine Norström
Merete Hofshagen
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Department for Health Surveillance, POB 750 Sentrum, 0106 Oslo, Norway. malin.jonsson@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Chickens
Cluster analysis
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology - veterinary
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Monte Carlo Method
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Registries
Seasons
Time Factors
Zoonoses
Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most frequently reported zoonosis in the EU and the epidemiology of sporadic campylobacteriosis, especially the routes of transmission, is to a great extent unclear. Poultry easily become colonised with Campylobacter spp., being symptom-less intestinal carriers. Earlier it was estimated that internationally between 50% and 80% of the cases could be attributed to chicken as a reservoir. In a Norwegian surveillance programme all broiler flocks under 50 days of age were tested for Campylobacter spp. The aim of the current study was to identify simultaneous local space-time clusters each year from 2002 to 2007 for human cases of campylobacteriosis and for broiler flocks testing positive for Campylobacter spp. using a multivariate spatial scan statistic method. A cluster occurring simultaneously in humans and broilers could indicate the presence of common factors associated with the dissemination of Campylobacter spp. for both humans and broilers.
Local space-time clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. occurring simultaneously were identified in all investigated years. All clusters but one were identified from May to August. Some municipalities were included in clusters all years.
The simultaneous occurrence of clusters of humans and broilers positive for Campylobacter spp. combined with the knowledge that poultry meat has a nation-wide distribution indicates that campylobacteriosis cases might also be caused by other risk factors than consumption and handling of poultry meat.Broiler farms that are positive could contaminate the environment with further spread to new broiler farms or to humans living in the area and local environmental factors, such as climate, might influence the spread of Campylobacter spp. in an area. Further studies to clarify the role of such factors are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20860801 View in PubMed
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460 records – page 1 of 46.