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Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Fjeld, Faith
Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
4925396
Keywords
Alaska
Reindeer herding
Sami
Yup'ik Inuit
Reindeer Project
Documents

Vesterheim-A-reindeer-story.pdf

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Breaking Conventions: How the Smithsonian's Arctic Studies Center Makes a Difference in the Community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257249
Source
First Alaskans. 2013 Feb/Mar; (): 56-60.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 website  

Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation: Looking back at twenty years of service

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96203
Publication Type
Report
Date
1993
Author
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Native Service
Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC)
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Aleut
Athapaskan
Bristol Bay region
Cannery doctors
Christianity
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Dillingham
Health aides
Influenza-measles epidemic
Iliamna Lake region
Indian Health Care Improvement Act of 1976
Indian Health Service
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975
Kanakanak Hospital
Midlevel practitioners
Missionaries
Mortality rates
Nushagak River region
PL 93-638
Public health nurses
Smallpox
Traditional Native healers
Tuberculosis
Yup'ik
Abstract
The Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) was the first tribal organization in the United States to use a P.L. 93-638 contract to manage and operate an Indian Health Service Unit. BBAHC was formed on behalf of 32 village tribes in 1973 and began managing and operating Kanakanak Hospital and Bristol Bay Area Service Unit in 1980. Twenty years have passed since the corporation took on its mission to provide health care programs to Native and other residents of Bristol Bay.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96203.
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Daily consumption of seal oil or salmon associated with lower risk of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in Yup'ik Eskimo and Athabaskan Indians of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102167
Source
Pages 271-275 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Amie Medical Research wl 53. Suppl. 2. pp. 271-275, 1994 Daily Consumption of Seal Oil or Salmon Associated with Lower Risk of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Yup'ik Eskimo and Athabaskan Indians of Alaska Amanda I. Adler I, Edward J. Boyko2
  1 document  
Author
Adler, A.I
Boyko, E.J
Schraer, C.D
Murphy, NJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Department of Medicine, University of Washington
Medical Service, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA
Diabetes Program, Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage, AK
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage, AK
Source
Pages 271-275 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Athabaskan
Blood glucose screening
Diabetes mellitus
Diet
Eskimos
Fatty acids
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose tolerance
Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)
Omega-3
Prevalence
Salmon
Seal oil
Yukon-Kuskokwim river delta
Yup'ik
Abstract
The prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) among Alaska Natives is rising but remains lower than other Native Americans. This low prevalence may result from diet. Among Yup'ik Eskimo and Athabaskans, we studied consumption of seal oil and salmon in relation to glucose intolerance. A screening study was performed in 666 Alaska Natives > 40 years old in 15 villages near the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. Subjects with a random capillary blood glucose > 6.72 mM underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. Cases included 11 incident and 26 previously diagnosed cases of NIDDM, and 17 incident and 1 previously diagnosed case of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Self-administered questionnaires were used to obtain food frequency data, available for 86% of subjects. Compared to less-than-daily consumption, both daily seal oil [odds ratio (OR) 0.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-0.8] and daily salmon consumption (OR 0.4, CI 0.2-1.0) were associated with a lower prevalence of IGT and NIDDM, controlling for age, ethnicity, body mass index, and sex. The effects were similar when limited to incident cases: OR 0.3, CI 0.1-1.3 for seal oil and OR 0.4, CI 0.1-1.3 for salmon. Eating seal oil fewer than 5 times per week did not confer protection. Diet may be a modifiable risk for glucose intolerance in this population.
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A healing journey based on Yuuyaraq, the way of the human being through Ellum Iinga, the Eye of Awareness

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273799
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Mar-2008
  1 document  
Author
Kanaqlak (George P. Charles)
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Eye of Awareness
Healing
Yup'ik values
Abstract
Mary Stachelrodt (younger sister of George P. Charles) developed the symbolic model of regaining Ellum Iinga (the Eye of Awareness) based on Yuuyaraq, The Way of the Human Being that is the central core for her work in alcohol and drug addiction in 1986. The central core of Yup'ik values are embedded within the circle with the four quadrants.
Documents

yr5_historical-trauma_3-08.pdf

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Tilting Point: The Resilience of Arctic Youth

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257063
Source
First Alaskans. 2014 Spring; (): 37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
  1 website  

Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76511
Date
March 2006
  1 document  
Author
Kramer, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center
Date
March 2006
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Native
Aleut
Traditional healing
Traditional healer
Yup'ik
Haida
Allopathic Medicine
Tsimshian
Inuit
Tlingit
Shamans
Athabascan
Notes
Graduate candidate essay, author did much of her research in Alaska
Documents

TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES.PDF

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7 records – page 1 of 1.