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[Acceptance of mammographic screening by immigrant women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19313
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2002
Author
Ida Kristine Holk
Nils Rosdahl
Karen L Damgaard Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Københavns, Frederiksberg Kommuner, Henrik Pontoppidansvej 8, DK-2200 København N.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Date
Jan-7-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mammography - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Patient compliance
Poland - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate compliance by ethnic groups to the mammography screening programme in the City of Copenhagen over six years and to look at developments over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mammography screening has, since 1 April 1991, been offered free of charge to all women between 50 and 69 years of age in the City of Copenhagen. Data on women born in Poland, Turkey, Yugoslavia, and Pakistan divided into five-year groups were compared to that of women born in Denmark and all other foreign-born women. Data from 1991 to 1997 were grouped according to the mammography performed, the offer refused, or non-appearance. RESULTS: Whereas 71% of Danish-born women accepted mammography, compliance by foreign-born women was significantly lower. The offer was accepted by 36% of Pakistanis, 45% of Yugoslavians, 53% of Turks, and 64% of Poles. Compliance fell in all ethnic groups with advancing age. Of the Danish women, 16% failed to keep the appointment. The corresponding percentages were 52 for Pakistanis, 48 for Yugoslavians, 41 for Turks, and 23 for Poles. The proportion of women who actively refused the offer was similar in all groups. The number of invited women fell during the period. CONCLUSIONS: The lower participation of women from the countries under study might have various explanations: among them the language barrier, procedure-related factors, and a lower incidence of breast cancer in the countries of origin.
PubMed ID
11831089 View in PubMed
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Access to occupational networks and ethnic variation of depressive symptoms in young adults in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292368
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 10; 190:207-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Alexander Miething
Mikael Rostila
Jens Rydgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: alexander.miething@sociology.su.se.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 10; 190:207-216
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Depression - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Prevalence
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods
Social capital
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Young Adult
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
Social capital research has recognized the relevance of occupational network contacts for individuals' life chances and status attainment, and found distinct associations dependent on ethnic background. A still fairly unexplored area is the health implications of occupational networks. The current approach thus seeks to study the relationship between access to occupational social capital and depressive symptoms in early adulthood, and to examine whether the associations differ between persons with native Swedish parents and those with parents born in Iran and the former Yugoslavia. The two-wave panel comprised 19- and 23-year-old Swedish citizens whose parents were born in either Sweden, Iran or the former Yugoslavia. The composition of respondents' occupational networks contacts was measured with a so-called position generator. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a two-item depression screener. A population-averaged model was used to estimate the associations between depressive symptoms and access to occupational contact networks. Similar levels of depressive symptoms in respondents with parents born in Sweden and Yugoslavia were contrasted by a notably higher prevalence of these conditions in those with an Iranian background. After socioeconomic conditions were adjusted for, regression analysis showed that the propensity for depressive symptoms in women with an Iranian background increased with a higher number of manual class contacts, and decreased for men and women with Iranian parents with a higher number of prestigious occupational connections. The respective associations in persons with native Swedish parents and parents from the former Yugoslavia are partly reversed. Access to occupational contact networks, but also perceived ethnic identity, explained a large portion of the ethnic variation in depression. Mainly the group with an Iranian background seems to benefit from prestigious occupational contacts. Among those with an Iranian background, social status concerns and expected marginalization in manual class occupations may have contributed to their propensity for depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
28866474 View in PubMed
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Adjustment and behaviour of Finnish and Southern European immigrant children in Stockholm. I. The teachers' assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41461
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(3):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
G. Aurelius
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(3):105-13
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Aggression
Anxiety
Child
Child Behavior
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - ethnology
Greece - ethnology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Schools
Self Concept
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior
Social Class
Sweden
Teaching
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
The adjustment and behaviour of immigrant schoolchildren were studied by means of teacher interviews. The material consisted of 50 Finnish and 37 southern European children. For comparison, 44 Swedish migrant children were also sampled. All had settled in the County of Stockholm three years prior to the study. Swedish children who had lived in the county for more than four years served as controls. In the teachers' opinions the immigrants as a whole had adjustment difficulties more often than the controls, but the proportion of children with such difficulties was no higher among the immigrant children. Compared with the controls the immigrant children showed a higher frequency of symptoms relating to a disordered self-esteem. The immigrant children were also considered to have a lower status and to be less trustworthy than the controls. The schooling of these children demands serious attention in order to prevent discrimination and to promote a feeling of personal worth among the children.
PubMed ID
524077 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about health and diabetes in men of different ethnic origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47078
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):47-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Katarina G Hjelm
Karin Bard
Per Nyberg
Jan Apelqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. katarina.hjelm@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):47-59
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arabia - ethnology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - psychology
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Men
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Sweden
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
AIM: This paper reports the findings of a study exploring the health and illness beliefs of men with diabetes, who were from different cultural backgrounds and living in Sweden. BACKGROUND: No studies have been reported that have focused on the beliefs about health and illness in men with diabetes mellitus of different ethnic origin. Beliefs may affect self-care and care-seeking behaviour. METHOD: An explorative study design and purposive sampling procedure was used. Focus-group interviews were held with 35 men with diabetes and aged between 39 and 78 years. Fourteen participants were born in Arabic countries, 10 in former Yugoslavia and 11 in Sweden. FINDINGS: Important factors for health were the ability to be occupied/employed and economically independent and, especially among Arabs and former Yugoslavians, sexual functioning. Swedes focused on heredity, lifestyle and management of diabetes, while non-Swedes claimed the influence of supernatural factors and emotional stress related to the role of being an immigrant and migratory experiences as factors related to development of diabetes and having a negative influence on health. Swedes and Arabs described health as "freedom from disease" in contrast to many former Yugoslavians who described health as "wealth and the most important thing in life". Knowledge about diabetes was limited among the men studied, but Arabs showed an active information-seeking behaviour compared with Swedes and former Yugoslavians. Non-Swedish respondents, particularly Arabs, had sought help from health care professionals to a greater extent than Swedes, who were more likely to use self-care measures. CONCLUSION: Being occupied/employed and having knowledge about the body and management of diabetes are important for positive health development. There are dissimilarities in beliefs about health and diabetes that influence self-care behaviour and health care seeking. Men's cultural backgrounds and spiritual beliefs need to be considered in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
15788065 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about health and illness essential for self-care practice: a comparison of migrant Yugoslavian and Swedish diabetic females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47924
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Nov;30(5):1147-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
K. Hjelm
P. Nyberg
A. Isacsson
J. Apelqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences Dalby/Lund, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Nov;30(5):1147-59
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Cultural Diversity
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care - psychology
Sweden
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
In a multicultural society the frequency of contact with migrant diabetic individuals will increase, as well as the need for knowledge about their beliefs about health and illness, which have rarely been studied. The aim of the present study was to explore beliefs about health and illness among migrant Yugoslavian and Swedish diabetic subjects that might affect their self-reported self-care practices and care-seeking behaviours. The study design was explorative, and a purposive sampling procedure was used. Fifteen females born in Sweden and 13 in former Yugoslavia, aged 33-73 years, with previously known diabetes mellitus were recruited from primary health care centres in southern Sweden. Median time of residence in Sweden was 5 years (range 2-30 years). Eight of the Yugoslavians had their diabetes diagnosed in Sweden. Focus-group interviews including scenarios of common problems related to diabetes mellitus were held. Yugoslavian females in general gave less tangible examples concerning beliefs about health and illness. Yugoslavians were orientated towards feelings related to their migratory experiences, enjoyed life by making deviations from dietary advice and retaining former traditions, and were less inclined towards self-monitoring and preventive foot care. They also expressed a passive role, depending on health care personnel, and discussed the influence of supernatural forces. Swedes expressed themselves in terms of medicine and a healthy lifestyle, took active part in their self-care and let self-monitoring guide their actions. Self-care was mainly practised to restore health when ill in both groups, and when help was needed it was sought in the professional sector (nurse or physician). Yugoslavians expressed higher confidence in physicians and used more natural cure medicine, side by side with biomedicine, while Swedes more frequently used alternative medicine. Demonstrated dissimilarities illustrate that beliefs about health and illness differ between migrant Yugoslavian and Swedish diabetic individuals, and are essential for self-care practice and care-seeking behaviour and must be considered when planning diabetes care.
PubMed ID
10564414 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in childhood and adolescence among the offspring of immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19153
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
X. Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Date
May-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Emigration and Immigration
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology - ethnology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The highest risk was noted for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among young offspring (0-4 years) of two Turkish parents (6.87). The currently available limited data on rates for childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in these countries do not explain the risk in the offspring of immigrants. Yugoslavs and Turks are recent immigrant groups to Sweden, and their offspring have been subject to much population mixing, perhaps leading to recurring infections and immunological stimulation, which may contribute to their excess of lymphomas.
PubMed ID
11986773 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19166
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology
Databases
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Netherlands - ethnology
North America - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse cancer risks in 613,000 adult immigrants to Sweden. All the immigrants had become parents in Sweden and their median age at immigration was 24 years for men and 22 years for women. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 18 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. Data were also available from compatriot marriages. All cancer was decreased by 5% and 8% for immigrant men and women, respectively. However, most of the male increase was due to lung cancer for which male immigrants showed a 41% excess. Among individual cancer sites and immigrant countries, 110 comparisons were significant, 62 showing protection and 48 an increased risk. Most of the differences between the rates in immigrants and Swedes could be ascribed to the variation of cancer incidence in the indigenous populations. Some high immigrant SIRs were 5.05 (n = 6, 95% CI 1.82-11.06) for stomach cancer in Rumanian women and 2.41 (41, 1.73-3.27) for lung cancer in Dutch men. At some sites, such as testis, prostate, skin (melanoma), kidney, cervix and nervous system, the SIRs for immigrants were decreased; in some groups of immigrants SIRs were about 0.20. The highest rates for testicular cancer were noted for Danes and Chileans. Women from Yugoslavia and Turkey had an excess of thyroid tumours. All immigrant groups showed breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers at or below the Swedish level but the differences were no more than 2-fold.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 20;101(3):298; author reply 29912209983
PubMed ID
11979437 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in second-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19165
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):229-37
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Female
Germany - ethnology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
North America - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scandinavia - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyze cancer risks in Sweden-born descendants of immigrants from European and North American countries. Our study included close to 600,000 0-66-year-old descendants of an immigrant father or mother. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 17 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. All cancer was marginally below the Swedish incidence in offspring of immigrant origin. Decreased SIRs were observed for breast cancer among Norwegian descendants, melanoma among descendants of Hungarian fathers and ovarian and bladder cancer among descendents of Finnish mothers, all consistent with the difference in cancer incidence between Swedes and the indigenous populations. Cervical cancer was increased in daughters of Danish men, whereas thyroid cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were in excess in offspring of parents of Yugoslav and Asian descent. Even these results agreed with the high incidence rates in parents compared to Swedes, except that for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma other explanations are needed; these may be related to immune malfunction. Comparison of the results between the first- and the second-generation immigrants suggest that the first 2 decades of life are important in setting the pattern for cancer development in subsequent life. Birth in Sweden sets the Swedish pattern for cancer incidence, irrespective of the nationality of descent, while entering Sweden in the 20s is already too late to influence the environmentally imprinted program for the cancer destiny.
PubMed ID
11979438 View in PubMed
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[Caries in 2-3 year old children in relation to feeding habits and nationality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36834
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
L A Nielsen
L. Esmark
Author Affiliation
Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Infant
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
PubMed ID
1449738 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.