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Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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Cognitive ability and decline after early life stress exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117065
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2013 Jun;34(6):1674-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Johan G Eriksson
Kati Heinonen
Eero Kajantie
Soile Tuovinen
Hanna Alastalo
Markus Henriksson
Jukka Leskinen
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2013 Jun;34(6):1674-9
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cognition - physiology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the effects of early life stress on cognitive ability and decline among men of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, 10% of whom were separated temporarily (mean age at separation = 4.1 years) from their parent(s) during World War II. The men underwent the Finnish Defense Forces Basic Intellectual Ability Test twice, at 20 years and retest at 70 years. Compared with the men without childhood separation and matched for year of birth (n = 186), men separated from their parents (n = 93) scored lower by 5.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], -9.2 to -1.7), 4.2 (95% CI, -8.1 to -0.3), 3.1 (95% CI, -7.0 to 0.8), and 4.5 (95% CI, -10.5 to -1.4) standardized points (SD = 15) on verbal, visuospatial, arithmetic, and general cognitive ability, respectively, at 70 years. Longer duration of separation was associated with lower test scores. Though early life stress was also associated significantly with weaker cognitive performance at the ages 20 and 70 years, it was not associated with cognitive decline over the 50-year period within this sample.
PubMed ID
23337341 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: the Finnish Genetics of Pre-eclampsia Consortium (FINNPEC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287275
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 10;6(11):e013148
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-10-2016
Author
Tiina Jääskeläinen
Seppo Heinonen
Eero Kajantie
Juha Kere
Katja Kivinen
Anneli Pouta
Hannele Laivuori
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 10;6(11):e013148
Date
11-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Medical History Taking
Pre-Eclampsia - etiology - genetics
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Research Design
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish Genetics of Pre-eclampsia Consortium (FINNPEC) Study was established to set up a nationwide clinical and DNA database on women with and without pre-eclampsia (PE), including their partners and infants, in order to identify genetic risk factors for PE.
FINNPEC is a cross-sectional case-control cohort collected from 5 university hospitals in Finland during 2008-2011. A total of 1450 patients with PE and 1065 pregnant control women without PE (aged 18-47 years) were recruited. Altogether, there were 1377 full triads (625 PE and 752 control triads).
The established cohort holds both clinical and genetic information of mother-infant-father triads representing a valuable resource for studying the pathogenesis of the disease. Furthermore, maternal biological samples (first and third trimester serum and placenta) will provide additional information for PE research. Until now, research has encompassed studies on candidate genes, Sanger and next-generation sequencing, and various studies on the placenta. FINNPEC has also participated in the InterPregGen study, which is the largest investigation on maternal and fetal genetic factors underlying PE until now.
Ongoing studies focus on elucidating the role of immunogenetic and metabolic factors in PE. Data on morbidity and mortality will be collected from mothers and fathers through links to the nationwide health registers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28067621 View in PubMed
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The developmental origins of chronic rheumatic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108252
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):655-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan G Eriksson
Eero Kajantie
David I W Phillips
Clive Osmond
Kent L Thornburg
David J P Barker
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Finland; Vasa Central Hospital, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland; Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):655-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Body Size
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Middle Aged
Placenta - physiology
Pregnancy
Rheumatic Heart Disease - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Programming is the phenomenon whereby the body's structures and functions are permanently set by nutrition and other influences during early development. There is increasing evidence that programming in utero initiates cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that susceptibility to developing chronic rheumatic heart disease on exposure to Streptococcus pyogenes is programmed.
We studied hospital admissions and deaths from chronic rheumatic heart disease in 20,431 people born in Helsinki, Finland, during 1924-1944. One hundred and one people, 56 men, and 45 women, had chronic rheumatic heart disease.
The disease was not associated with body or placental size at birth. It was, however, associated with a long umbilical cord so that the hazard ratio for the disease was 1.23 (95% CI 1.04-1.45, P?=?0.02) for every 10 cm increase in cord length. This association was present in people with mitral valve disease, hazard ratio 1.5 (1.20-1.89, P?
PubMed ID
23913477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early life origins cognitive decline: findings in elderly men in the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116573
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54707
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Katri Raikkonen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Hanna Alastalo
Jukka T Leskinen
Kai Nyman
Markus Henriksson
Jari Lahti
Marius Lahti
Riikka Pyhälä
Soile Tuovinen
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. katri.raikkonen@helsinki.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54707
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Size
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cognition - physiology
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether the adverse effects of slow prenatal and postnatal growth on cognitive function persist to old age and predict age related cognitive decline.
A longitudinal birth cohort study of men born in Helsinki, Finland 1934-44.
Nine-hundred-thirty-one men of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, with detailed data on growth from birth to adulthood, aged 20.1 (SD = 1.4) at the first and 67.9 (SD = 2.5) years at the second cognitive testing.
The Finnish Defense Forces Basic Intellectual Ability Test assessed twice over nearly five decades apart.
Lower weight, length and head circumference at birth were associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years (1.04-1.55 points lower ability per each standard deviation [SD] unit decrease in body size, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI]: 0.05 to 2.72) and with cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.07-0.11 SD decline over time per each SD decrease in body size, 95%CI:0.00 to 0.19). Men who were born larger were more likely to perform better in the cognitive ability test over time (1.22-1.43 increase in odds to remain in the top relative to the lower two thirds in ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:1.04 to 1.79) and were more resilient to cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.69 to 0.76 decrease in odds to decline from than remain in the top third of ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:0.49 to 0.99). Slower growth between birth and two years in weight, height and body mass index was associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years, but not with cognitive decline.
Poorer lifetime cognitive ability is predicted by slower growth before and after birth. In predicting resilience to age related cognitive decline, the period before birth seems to be more critical.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23382945 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food and nutrient intakes in young adults born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300092
Source
Pediatr Res. 2018 03; 83(3):589-596
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Satu Männistö
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Kati Heinonen
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Marja Vääräsmäki
Katri Räikkönen
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2018 03; 83(3):589-596
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Food
Food Preferences
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Nutrients
Patient compliance
Premature Birth
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
BackgroundAdults born preterm have higher levels of cardiometabolic risk factors than their term-born peers. Studies have suggested that at least those born smallest eat less healthily. We examined the association between early (
PubMed ID
29166380 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and intellectual abilities in the offspring in young adulthood: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135252
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Jun;44(4):394-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Soile Tuovinen
Katri Räikkönen
Eero Kajantie
Jukka T Leskinen
Markus Henriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Clive Osmond
David Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Jun;44(4):394-403
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Albuminuria
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Development - physiology
Finland
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - etiology
Intellectual Disability - etiology
Linear Models
Male
Pregnancy
Young Adult
Abstract
Hypertensive disorders may affect the fetal developmental milieu and thus hint at mechanisms by which prenatal adversity associates with poorer intellectual ability in subsequent life.
We tested if hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are associated with intellectual ability in the offspring in young adulthood and if any potential associations between hypertensive disorders and intellectual abilities differ according to length of gestation, birth-weight, parity, and childhood socio-economic background.
Using mothers' blood pressure and urinary protein measurements at maternity clinics and birth hospitals, we defined normotensive or hypertensive pregnancies in mothers of 1,196 men who participated in the Helsinki Birth Cohort 1934-1944 Study. At age 20 years the men completed a test on intellectual abilities during compulsory military service.
Participants born after pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders scored lower on intellectual abilities compared to those born after normotensive pregnancies. The effects of hypertensive disorders were most obvious in men born preterm or after a primiparous pregnancy and in men of higher childhood socio-economic background.
Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are, albeit weakly, associated with lower intellectual abilities in the offspring. These findings are compatible with the concept of adverse fetal 'programming' by a suboptimal prenatal environment.
PubMed ID
21495787 View in PubMed
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Independent living and romantic relations among young adults born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261212
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Feb;135(2):290-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Tuija Männistö
Marja Vääräsmäki
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Katri Räikkönen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Feb;135(2):290-7
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beauty
Body Image
Body mass index
Coitus - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Love
Male
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
Young adults born preterm at very low birth weight start families later. Whether less severe immaturity affects adult social outcomes is poorly known.
The study "Preterm birth and early life programming of adult health and disease" (ESTER, 2009-2011) identified adults born early preterm (
PubMed ID
25624386 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.