Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16928 records – page 1 of 1693.

Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Management Continuum--2010 Consensus Summary for children six years of age and over, and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145199
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):15-24
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
M D Lougheed
C. Lemière
S D Dell
F M Ducharme
J Mark Fitzgerald
R. Leigh
C. Licskai
B H Rowe
D. Bowie
A. Becker
Louis-Philippe Boulet
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mdl@queensu.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):15-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Child
Humans
Young Adult
Abstract
To integrate new evidence into the Canadian Asthma Management Continuum diagram, encompassing both pediatric and adult asthma.
The Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Committee members, comprised of experts in pediatric and adult respirology, allergy and immunology, emergency medicine, general pediatrics, family medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and evidence-based medicine, updated the continuum diagram, based primarily on the 2008 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines, and performed a focused review of literature pertaining to key aspects of asthma diagnosis and management in children six years of age and over, and adults.
In patients six years of age and over, management of asthma begins with establishing an accurate diagnosis, typically by supplementing medical history with objective measures of lung function. All patients and caregivers should receive self-management education, including a written action plan. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) remain the first-line controller therapy for all ages. When asthma is not controlled with a low dose of ICS, the literature supports the addition of long-acting beta2-agonists in adults, while the preferred approach in children is to increase the dose of ICS. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are acceptable as second-line monotherapy and as an alternative add-on therapy in both age groups. Antiimmunoglobulin E therapy may be of benefit in adults, and in children 12 years of age and over with difficult to control allergic asthma, despite high-dose ICS and at least one other controller.
The foundation of asthma management is establishing an accurate diagnosis based on objective measures (eg, spirometry) in individuals six years of age and over. Emphasis is placed on the similarities and differences between pediatric and adult asthma management approaches to achieve asthma control.
Notes
Cites: Thorax. 2006 Feb;61(2):105-1016308336
Cites: Chest. 2005 Sep;128(3):1128-3516162697
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Apr;48(4):400-716607195
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Jun 20;144(12):904-1216754916
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(4):CD00313717054161
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Nov 7;145(9):692-417088583
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2007;7:817518999
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008 Feb;162(2):157-6318250241
Cites: Thorax. 2008 Aug;63(8):671-618663068
Cites: Chest. 2008 Sep;134(3 Suppl):1S-41S18779187
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 18;179(11):1121-3119015563
Cites: Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2009 Jan;15(1):39-4519077704
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2009 Apr;33(4):897-90619336592
Cites: Environ Res. 2009 Jul;109(5):567-7419406394
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Jul 1;180(1):59-9919535666
Cites: Environ Health. 2009;8:2519515235
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD00794919588447
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(4):CD00530719821344
Cites: Am J Med. 1999 Dec;107(6):580-710625027
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Mar 25;320(7238):827-3210731173
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00128210796632
Cites: Pediatrics. 2000 Jul;106(1):E810878177
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Oct 12;343(15):1054-6311027739
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Oct 12;343(15):1064-911027740
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Dec;162(6):2341-5111112161
Cites: Thorax. 2001 Mar;56(3):180-211182008
Cites: Chest. 2002 Feb;121(2):329-3311834639
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(2):CD00001112076376
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(3):CD00231412137655
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 29;167(9):1008-912403741
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1):CD00111712535399
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1):CD00410712535511
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Mar 1;167(5):787-9712598220
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(2):CD00149612804410
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2004 Jan;89(1):60-314709510
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2):CD00217115106169
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2):CD00231415106175
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2):CD00313315106191
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 May-Jun;11 Suppl A:9A-18A15254605
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Sep 9;351(11):1134-615356312
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Apr 24;1(7965):882-458147
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 May 12;330(19):1329-348152444
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 May;13(5):1198-20810414427
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Apr;95(4):652-915798126
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Jul;116(1):26-3015990768
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul 15;172(2):149-6015849323
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Aug;26(2):319-3816055882
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6 Suppl):S12-416157728
Cites: Respir Med. 2006 Apr;100(4):648-5716159709
PubMed ID
20186367 View in PubMed
Less detail

Finnish Study Finds No Associations Between Early Abortion and Adverse Outcomes in Young Adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290890
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2016 Dec; 48(4):237-238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2016 Dec; 48(4):237-238
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Female
Finland
Humans
Pregnancy
Young Adult
PubMed ID
27992703 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016 Apr 04;113
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-04-2016
Author
Eva Rönmark
Helena Backman
Linnea Hedman
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016 Apr 04;113
Date
Apr-04-2016
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Allergic sensitization, an important risk factor for allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, has increased worldwide. Almost half of the young adult population is sensitized to common airborne allergens. Parallel, the prevalence of asthma and clinical allergy also increased all over the world. Allergic diseases are the most common diseases among children, adolescents and young adults in Sweden. Among adults, 8-10% have asthma, 30% rhinitis and 11% eczema. Among children and adolescents around 5-8% report food allergy. Part of the increase in asthma prevalence is related to changes in diagnostic criteria and increased awareness in the population. The increase may have levelled off in some areas.
PubMed ID
27046755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term changes of socioeconomic differences in height among young adult men in Southern Sweden, 1818-1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264875
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2014 Dec;15:140-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Stefan Öberg
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2014 Dec;15:140-52
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Humans
Male
Occupations
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The study explores the long-term trends in socioeconomic differences in height among young adult men. We linked information from conscript inspections to a longitudinal demographic database of five parishes in Southern Sweden. Detailed information on the occupation and landholding was used to investigate the differences in height. Even if there is indication of a reduction in the magnitude of the differences in height over time the reduction is neither dramatic nor uniform. The most systematic and consistent difference is that sons of fathers with white collar occupations were taller than others. They were 4cm taller than the sons of low-skilled manual workers in the first half of the 19th century, and almost 2cm taller in the mid-20th century. This difference is much smaller than those found between elite and destitute groups historically, in for example Britain, but comparable to that found in other studies on 19th century populations using information on family background. Most of the reduction in the socioeconomic differences in height was a result of reduced height penalty and premium for small disadvantaged and privileged groups. Changes in the distribution of income and the economic structure are plausible explanations for the changes in socioeconomic differences in height.
PubMed ID
25212182 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Norway must again increase the intervention against tobacco]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96497
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jul 1;130(13):1325
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2010
Author
Frode Gallefoss
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jul 1;130(13):1325
Date
Jul-1-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Humans
Norway
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
PubMed ID
20596095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Recommended Nordic paediatric reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120355
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Feb;73(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Linda Hilsted
Pål Rustad
Lise Aksglæde
Kaspar Sørensen
Anders Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. linda.hilsted@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Feb;73(1):1-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Reference Values
Young Adult
Abstract
Paediatric reference intervals based on samples from healthy children are difficult to establish and consequently data are often from hospitalized children. Furthermore, biases may present in published data due to differences in the analytical methods employed. Blood samples from 1429 healthy Danish children were collected for establishing reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties (Alanine transaminase, Albumin, Alkaline phosphatase, Aspartate transaminase, Bilirubin, Calcium, Cholesterol, Creatinine, Creatine kinase, HDL-Cholesterol, Iron, Lactate dehydrogenase, LDL- Cholesterol, Magnesium, Phosphate, Potassium, Protein, Sodium, Transferrin, Triglycerides and Urate). Samples were analyzed on a Roche-Modular-P/ISE-system. The NORIP reference material (NFKK Reference Serum X) was included in all the analytical runs. Reference values were recalculated according to the target values of X for the properties and statistical calculations carried out as performed in the NORIP study. Thus commutable (regarding analytical method) reference intervals for 20 properties were established and for LDL-Cholesterol reference intervals were reported for the specific analytical method employed. The data were compared to previous studies and to those obtained from the youngest age group in the NORIP study. Marked age differences were observed for most of the properties. Several properties also showed gender-related differences, mainly at the onset of puberty. Data are presented as suggested intervals for combined age groups, but can be accessed via the NORIP home page if more detailed division according to age or gender is desired.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Dec;73(8):661
PubMed ID
23013046 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brief report: engagement in sport and identity status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142426
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Oct;34(5):1087-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Michael A Busseri
Kelly A Costain
Kelly M Campbell
Linda Rose-Krasnor
Jennifer Evans
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada L2S 3A1. mbusseri@brocku.ca
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Oct;34(5):1087-91
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Social Identification
Sports
Young Adult
Abstract
Drawing on identity development theory, the connection between engagement in sport and identity status was examined. First-year undergraduates (n = 116 sport-involved youth; 67% women; mean age = 18.58 yrs) completed measures of interpersonal and ideological identity status (achievement, moratorium, diffusion, foreclosure), along with behavioral (breadth, intensity) and psychological (e.g., enjoyment, competence) indicators of sport engagement. Using structural equation modeling, we examined the relation between latent sport engagement and identity status in interpersonal and ideological domains. As hypothesized, latent sport engagement predicted greater interpersonal (but not ideological) identity achievement. Consistent with identity development theory, an additional specific relation was observed between lower breadth of sport involvement and higher interpersonal identity achievement. Results demonstrate the value of examining behavioral and psychological indicators of sport engagement jointly, and support a growing body of research linking sport and positive youth development.
PubMed ID
20599262 View in PubMed
Less detail
Date
Sep-2009
  1 website  
Author
Alaska Native Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Keywords
Adults
Alaska Natives
Children
Elders
Infants
Suicide risk
Teens
Young adults
Abstract
In the Dena'ina Athabascan language Yagheli Ch'tsizlan means "we are getting healthier," and in many important ways this is true. Although we face many challenges, the Alaska Native community has made great strides in health over the years. In this booklet we are highlighting some key Alaska Native health concerns. Addressing these concerns is an important step on the path towards getting healthier.
Online Resources
Less detail

Case study of posts before and after a suicide on a Swedish internet forum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277329
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Michael Westerlund
Gergö Hadlaczky
Danuta Wasserman
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):476-82
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Humans
Internet
Male
Social Support
Suicide - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Websites and discussion forums have become an important and sometimes controversial source of information on suicide. Using a case report, our aim was to examine the responses, attitudes and beliefs that were communicated on a forum before, during and after a suicide act. We undertook two related analyses: a qualitative investigation of the messages that were posted before the suicide and a combined qualitative-quantitative analysis of the messages posted during and after the suicide. Nearly half the posted messages before the suicide encouraged the victim to complete the suicidal act, and a surprising number of posts after the suicide expressed excitement, although around half of the posts considered the suicide to be tragic. It is of great importance to increase awareness of suicide signals and understanding about how to respond to individuals who communicate suicide intentions on different forums on the internet.
Notes
Cites: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2012 Feb;262(1):39-4621505949
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Feb;24(1):63-820117690
Cites: Crisis. 2011;32(3):128-3321616761
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2009;13(3):264-7619591000
Cites: J Prev Med Public Health. 2009 May;42(3):183-919491562
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;32(4):516-5118800195
Cites: Crisis. 2008;29(3):118-2218714907
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Apr 12;336(7648):800-218403541
Cites: Crisis. 1997;18(2):73-99286130
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1990 Jan;97(1):90-1132408091
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Feb;147(2):190-52278535
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2010;12(5):e4821169164
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):234-4320807970
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;47(3):392-41820688797
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Jul;75(2):419-2822580072
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2012 Oct;42(5):471-8522924960
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(5):e12223010086
Cites: Psychol Rep. 2012 Aug;111(1):186-823045860
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;50(2):303-2223315147
Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):467-7525137113
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Apr 18;385(9977):1536-4425579833
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;16(7):379-8511728849
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):365-7114522610
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1986 May;73(5):481-993751655
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;27(6):675-873058676
PubMed ID
26628690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Menstrual cycles are influenced by sunshine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140158
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011 Sep;27(9):711-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Konstantin V Danilenko
Oksana Y Sergeeva
Evgeniy G Verevkin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. kvdani@mail.ru
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011 Sep;27(9):711-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Ovary - physiology
Russia
Seasons
Sunlight
Young Adult
Abstract
The study determined the effect of seasons and meteorological variables on ovarian-menstrual function.
Women (N=129) living in Novosibirsk (55°N), Russia, provided data on normal menstrual cycles for over 1 year between 1999 and 2008. Of these, 18 together with 20 other healthy women were investigated once in winter and once in summer in 2006-2009. The investigated variables included serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and prolactin on day ~ 7 of the menstrual cycle, ovary follicle size (by ultrasound) on day ~ 12 and ovulation occurrence on subsequent days.
In summer vs. winter, there was a trend towards increased FSH secretion, significantly larger ovarian follicle size, higher frequency of ovulation (97% vs. 71%) and a shorter menstrual cycle (by 0.9 days). LH and prolactin levels did not change. In all seasons combined, increased sunshine (data derived from local meteorological records) 2-3 days before the presumed ovulation day (calculated from the mean menstrual cycle) led to a shorter cycle length. Air/perceived temperature, atmospheric pressure, moon phase/light were not significant predictors.
Ovarian activity is greater in summer vs. winter in women living in a continental climate at temperate latitudes; sunshine is a factor that influences menstrual cycle.
PubMed ID
20937003 View in PubMed
Less detail

16928 records – page 1 of 1693.