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Identification and characterization of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica isolates by PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29621
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Jul;71(7):3674-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
S. Thisted Lambertz
M-L Danielsson-Tham
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Research and Development Department, PO Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden. sula@slv.se
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Jul;71(7):3674-81
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Meat - microbiology
Meat Products - microbiology
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Swine
Virulence - genetics
Yersinia Infections - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Abstract
Approximately 550 to 600 yersiniosis patients are reported annually in Sweden. Although pigs are thought to be the main reservoir of food-borne pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, the role of pork meat as a vehicle for transmission to humans is still unclear. Pork meat collected from refrigerators and local shops frequented by yersiniosis patients (n=48) were examined for the presence of pathogenic Yersinia spp. A combined culture and PCR method was used for detection, and a multiplex PCR was developed and evaluated as a tool for efficient identification of pathogenic food and patient isolates. The results obtained with the multiplex PCR were compared to phenotypic test results and confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 118 pork products (91 raw and 27 ready-to-eat) were collected. Pathogenic Yersinia spp. were detected by PCR in 10% (9 of 91) of the raw pork samples (loin of pork, fillet of pork, pork chop, ham, and minced meat) but in none of the ready-to-eat products. Isolates of Y. enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3 were recovered from six of the PCR-positive raw pork samples; all harbored the virulence plasmid. All isolates were recovered from food collected in shops and, thus, none were from the patients' home. When subjected to PFGE, the six isolates displayed four different NotI profiles. The same four NotI profiles were also present among isolates recovered from the yersiniosis patients. The application of a multiplex PCR was shown to be an efficient tool for identification of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates in naturally contaminated raw pork.
PubMed ID
16000776 View in PubMed
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National outbreak of Yersinia enterocolitica infections in military and civilian populations associated with consumption of mixed salad, Norway, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280968
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Aug 25;21(34)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2016
Author
Emily MacDonald
Margot Einöder-Moreno
Katrine Borgen
Lin Thorstensen Brandal
Lore Diab
Øivind Fossli
Bernardo Guzman Herrador
Ammar Ali Hassan
Gro S Johannessen
Eva Jeanette Johansen
Roger Jørgensen Kimo
Tore Lier
Bjørn Leif Paulsen
Rodica Popescu
Charlotte Tokle Schytte
Kristin Sæbø Pettersen
Line Vold
Øyvind Ørmen
Astrid Louise Wester
Marit Wiklund
Karin Nygård
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Aug 25;21(34)
Date
Aug-25-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Contact Tracing
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Notification
Disease Outbreaks
Food contamination - analysis
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Military Personnel
Minisatellite Repeats
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
In May 2014, a cluster of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) O9 infections was reported from a military base in northern Norway. Concurrently, an increase in YE infections in civilians was observed in the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases. We investigated to ascertain the extent of the outbreak and identify the source in order to implement control measures. A case was defined as a person with laboratory-confirmed YE O9 infection with the outbreak multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA)-profile (5-6-9-8-9-9). We conducted a case-control study in the military setting and calculated odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. Traceback investigations were conducted to identify common suppliers and products in commercial kitchens frequented by cases. By 28 May, we identified 133 cases, of which 117 were linked to four military bases and 16 were civilians from geographically dispersed counties. Among foods consumed by cases, multivariable analysis pointed to mixed salad as a potential source of illness (OR 10.26; 95% confidence interval (CI):?0.85-123.57). The four military bases and cafeterias visited by 14/16 civilian cases received iceberg lettuce or radicchio rosso from the same supplier. Secondary transmission cannot be eliminated as a source of infection in the military camps. The most likely source of the outbreak was salad mix containing imported radicchio rosso, due to its long shelf life. This outbreak is a reminder that fresh produce should not be discounted as a vehicle in prolonged outbreaks and that improvements are still required in the production and processing of fresh salad products.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27588690 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in Finnish Slaughter Pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278239
Source
J Food Prot. 2016 Apr;79(4):677-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
T. Rahikainen Ibañez
R. Laukkanen-Ninios
M. Hakkinen
T. Johansson
M. Vilar
H. Korkeala
Source
J Food Prot. 2016 Apr;79(4):677-81
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The prevalence of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica was determined in tonsil and intestinal content samples from 388 healthy fattening pigs at the four biggest Finnish slaughterhouses. These slaughterhouses process 73% of pigs in Finland. Tonsil samples were tested by PCR targeted for yadA, and intestinal samples were cultured. All pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates represented bioserotype 4/O:3. The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil samples was 60% (95% confidence limit, 55.4 to 65.1%), and its prevalence in intestinal samples was 26% (95% confidence limit, 22.1 to 31.2%). The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil and intestinal samples varied between the four slaughterhouses. The tonsil prevalence of Y. enterocolitica was higher in slaughterhouse B, and the prevalence in intestinal content was higher in slaughterhouse C. There were more positive results in both tonsil and intestinal samples in pigs coming from fattening farms than in pigs coming from farrowing-and-fattening farms. A seasonal variation was observed in the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in intestinal samples, with the highest prevalence during July and August, but no seasonal variation was detected in tonsil samples.
PubMed ID
27052875 View in PubMed
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Sporadic human Yersinia enterocolitica infections caused by bioserotype 4/O : 3 originate mainly from pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169323
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2006 Jun;55(Pt 6):747-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Maria Fredriksson-Ahomaa
Andreas Stolle
Anja Siitonen
Hannu Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Institute of Hygiene and Technology of Food of Animal Origin, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. m.fredriksson@lmu.de
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2006 Jun;55(Pt 6):747-9
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology
Finland
Food Microbiology
Genotype
Germany
Humans
Serotyping
Sus scrofa - microbiology
Virulence
Yersinia Infections - microbiology - transmission
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Abstract
Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O : 3 is the most frequent cause of sporadic human yersiniosis in Finland and Germany. To investigate the possible link between pigs and humans, 282 human and 534 porcine strains from Finland and Germany were characterized with PFGE using NotI, ApaI and XhoI enzymes. Most of the human strains (>80 %) were indistinguishable from the porcine strains in both countries and most of the genotypes (178/182) were different in Finland and Germany. The indistinguishable genotypes among human and porcine strains together with different genotypes in Finland and Germany indicate that pigs are an important source of sporadic yersiniosis in both countries.
PubMed ID
16687594 View in PubMed
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Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. enterocolitica-like species in clinical stool specimens of humans: identification and prevalence of bio/serotypes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152627
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Jul;28(7):757-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
L M Sihvonen
K. Haukka
M. Kuusi
M J Virtanen
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. box 30, FI-00271, Helsinki, Finland. leila.sihvonen@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Jul;28(7):757-65
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cluster analysis
DNA Gyrase - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Prevalence
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
This study investigated the prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) bio/serotypes and YE-like species in clinical stool specimens. The special aim was to find the best methods for accurate identification of YE species and, further, pathogenic strains among YE isolates. Of the 41,848 specimens cultured in ten laboratories during a 12-month period, 473 Yersinia strains were isolated from 462 patients. The strains were identified by 21 biochemical tests, serotyping, colony morphology, as well as by 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequencing. The most prevalent Yersinia findings were YE biotype 1A (64% of the strains) and pathogenic bio/serotype 4/O:3 (16%). The cold-enrichment increased the number of all isolates, and 25% of the bio/serotype 4/O:3 and 2/O:9 strains were only found by cold-enrichment. In routine diagnostic laboratories, 50% of the YE-like species were identified as YE and in 26% the identification differed from that of the reference laboratory. The microscopic colony identification on CIN agar with positive CR-MOX test, combined with several biochemical tests, identified reliably the pathogenic YE bioserotypes and most YE BT 1A strains, but some strains of the YE-like species were so heterogenic that gene sequencing was the only way to identify them.
PubMed ID
19219471 View in PubMed
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Yersinia enterocolitica outbreak associated with ready-to-eat salad mix, Norway, 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121158
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Sep;18(9):1496-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Emily MacDonald
Berit Tafjord Heier
Karin Nygård
Torunn Stalheim
Kofitsyo S Cudjoe
Taran Skjerdal
Astrid Louise Wester
Bjørn-Arne Lindstedt
Trine-Lise Stavnes
Line Vold
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postboks 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. emily.macdonald@fhi.no
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Sep;18(9):1496-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Serotyping
Yersinia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2011, an outbreak of illness caused by Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 in Norway was linked to ready-to-eat salad mix, an unusual vehicle for this pathogen. The outbreak illustrates the need to characterize isolates of this organism, and reinforces the need for international traceback mechanisms for fresh produce.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22932318 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.