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Descriptive epidemiology of enteric illness for selected reportable diseases in Ontario, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166033
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2006 Dec 1;32(23):275-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2006

Distribution of enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. and Salmonella spp. in the Swedish wild boar population, and assessment of risk factors that may affect their prevalence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294518
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2018 Jul 03; 60(1):40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-03-2018
Author
Axel Sannö
Thomas Rosendal
Anna Aspán
Annette Backhans
Magdalena Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7054, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden. axel.sanno@slu.se.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2018 Jul 03; 60(1):40
Date
Jul-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Male
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Prevalence
Risk factors
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - microbiology
Sus scrofa
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Yersinia enterocolitica - isolation & purification
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Abstract
Pure Eurasian wild boars and/or hybrids with domestic pigs are present in the wild on most continents. These wild pigs have been demonstrated to carry a large number of zoonotic and epizootic pathogens such as Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis. Wild boar populations throughout Europe are growing and more and more wild boar meat is being consumed, the majority within the homes of hunters without having passed a veterinary inspection. The aim of this study was to investigate if factors such as population density, level of artificial feeding, time since establishment of a given population, and the handling of animal by-products from slaughtered animals could influence the presence of these pathogens in the wild boar.
In total, 90 wild boars from 30 different populations in Sweden were sampled and analysed using a protocol combining pre-cultivation and PCR-detection. The results showed that 27% of the sampled wild boars were positive for Salmonella spp., 31% were positive for Y. enterocolitica and 22% were positive for Y. pseudotuberculosis. In 80% of the sampled populations, at least one wild boar was positive for one of these enteropathogens and in total, 60% of the animals carried at least one of the investigated enteropathogens. The presumptive risk factors were analysed using a case-control approach, however, no significant associations were found.
Human enteropathogens are commonly carried by wild boars, mainly in the tonsils, and can thus constitute a risk for contamination of the carcass and meat during slaughter. Based on the present results, the effect of reducing population densities and number of artificial feeding places might be limited.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29970104 View in PubMed
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Household outbreaks among culture-confirmed cases of bacterial gastrointestinal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181580
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 15;159(4):406-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2004
Author
Steen Ethelberg
Katharina E P Olsen
Peter Gerner-Smidt
Kåre Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastrointestinal and Parasitic Infections, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. set@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 15;159(4):406-12
Date
Feb-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Campylobacter
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology - microbiology
Family Characteristics
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Shigella sonnei
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica
Abstract
To examine the general frequency of household outbreaks, the authors performed a retrospective search among cases of the five most frequent gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens in Denmark, a country of 5.3 million inhabitants. This was done for 57,667 cases registered from 1991 to 2001 by finding all cases that shared addresses and became infected within 3 weeks of one another. The percentage of cases that were part of household outbreaks was found to be 3.2% for Campylobacter, 13.3% for Salmonella serotype Enteritidis, 5.6% for Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, 2.0% for Yersinia enterocolitica, and 10.4% for Shigella sonnei. The vast majority of the outbreaks had not previously been registered. The wide variation in the ability to cause household outbreaks among the different types of bacteria reflects differences in their epidemiology and most likely also mirrors their overall outbreak potential. Differences in the time occurring between infections of household members may also indicate differences in the importance of person-to-person transmission for the different types of bacteria. The fact that household outbreaks occur with a relatively high frequency may be utilized in future analyses of sources of infection, in particular of Campylobacter, for which more household outbreaks than expected were identified.
PubMed ID
14769645 View in PubMed
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Management practices associated with the carriage of Yersinia enterocolitica in pigs at farm level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261477
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013 Jul;10(7):595-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
María J Vilar
Sonja Virtanen
Mari Heinonen
Hannu Korkeala
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013 Jul;10(7):595-602
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Environmental monitoring
Feces - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Risk factors
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Yersinia enterocolitica - immunology - isolation & purification - physiology
Abstract
Pigs are the most important reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica infections in humans. Knowledge of farm management practices that contribute to the transmission of this bacterial species in pigs is essential to understand how to control this foodborne pathogen in food production. The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica, and other results obtained from an age trend analysis were used to estimate the on-farm risk of transmission of specific management practices for this pathogen in 30 pig farms in Finland. Log-linear analysis revealed that rearing pigs in pens without or with sparse amounts of bedding and buying piglets from more than one farm were the variables that contribute most to the occurrence of Y. enterocolitica. The study also found that using an all-in/all-out management system and supplying water of municipal origin were factors that might reduce the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica, and therefore the risk of transmission of Y. enterocolitica in pig farms.
PubMed ID
23789808 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of antibodies to Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 among Norwegian military recruits: association with risk factors and clinical manifestations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75105
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;10(6):749-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
A. Saebø
G. Kapperud
J. Lassen
J. Waage
Author Affiliation
Institute of Surgery, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;10(6):749-55
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Appendectomy - statistics & numerical data
Appendicitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Mesenteric Lymphadenitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Military Personnel
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Swine
Travel
Urban health
Water supply
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - immunology
Abstract
IgG antibody activity to Yersinia enterocolitica serogroup O:3 was detected in sera from 56 (7.4%) of 755 Norwegian military recruits, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest prevalence was found among recruits from Oslo city (12/56, 21.4%). The recruits answered a questionnaire which covered demographic data, specific exposures, and clinical information. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with IgG activity in logistic regression analysis: receiving drinking water from a private well (odds ratio (OR) = 3.40; p = 0.004), being a resident of Oslo city (OR = 2.99; p = 0.006), and living in eastern Norway (OR = 2.25; p = 0.015). By univariate analysis, living in an urban area was associated with IgG activity, but this factor did not independently affect risk. Present or previous contact with animals, including pigs, and travels abroad were not associated with an increased risk. Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 seropositive recruits were more likely to report previous surgery for suspected appendicitis than seronegative individuals (OR = 4.26; p = 0.0024). Among recruits with previous appendectomy, mesenteric lymphadenitis as the sole peroperative finding was more common in patients with IgG activity to Y. enterocolitica O:3 (4/7) than in seronegative patients (1/19) (p = 0.01). Recurrent diarrhea, steatorrhea or joint complaints were not associated with antibody activity.
PubMed ID
7672058 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in Swedish pig farms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294519
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2018 Jun 25; 60(1):39
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-25-2018
Author
Therese Råsbäck
Thomas Rosendal
Michael Stampe
Axel Sannö
Anna Aspán
Katarina Järnevi
Elina Tast Lahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, National Veterinary Institute (SVA), 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2018 Jun 25; 60(1):39
Date
Jun-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs
Feces - microbiology
Prevalence
Sus scrofa
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Yersinia enterocolitica - isolation & purification
Abstract
Pigs are the most important reservoir for human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica. We investigated the herd prevalence of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in Swedish pig farms by analysing pen faecal samples using a cold enrichment of 1 week and thereafter subsequent plating onto chromogenic selective media (CAY agar).
Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica was found in 32 (30.5%) of the 105 sampled farms with finisher pigs. Bioserotype 4/O:3 was identified at all but one farm, where 2/O:9 was identified. Pen-prevalence within the positive herds varied from 1/4 to 4/4 pens. The calculated intra-class correlation coefficient ICC (0.89) from a model with a random effect for grouping within herd indicated a very high degree of clustering by herd. None of the explored risk factors, including herd size, herd type, pig flow, feed type, access to outdoors, evidence of birds and rodents in the herd, usage of straw, number of pigs in sampled pen and age of pigs in pen were significantly associated with Y. enterocolitica status of the pen. The use of high pressure washing with cold water was significantly associated with Y. enterocolitica in the pen (OR?=?84.77, 4.05-1772). Two culture methods were assessed for detection of Y. enterocolitica, one of which included the use of a chromogenic agar (CAY agar) intended for detection of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica. The chromogenic media was found equal or superior to traditional methods and was used in this study. The isolates obtained were characterised by biotyping, serotyping, mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and PCR. Characterisation by MALDI-TOF gave identical results to that of conventional bioserotyping. All porcine isolates were positive for the ail and inv genes by PCR, indicating that the isolates were most likely pathogenic to humans.
Human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica was found in nearly one-third of the Swedish pig farms with finisher pigs. The use of high pressure washing with cold water was associated with the presence of Y. enterocolitica in the pen. A modified culturing method using a chromogenic agar was efficient for detection of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in pig faeces. The use of masspectrometry for identification and subtyping was in agreement with conventional biotyping and serotyping methods.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29940995 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in Finnish Slaughter Pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278239
Source
J Food Prot. 2016 Apr;79(4):677-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
T. Rahikainen Ibañez
R. Laukkanen-Ninios
M. Hakkinen
T. Johansson
M. Vilar
H. Korkeala
Source
J Food Prot. 2016 Apr;79(4):677-81
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The prevalence of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica was determined in tonsil and intestinal content samples from 388 healthy fattening pigs at the four biggest Finnish slaughterhouses. These slaughterhouses process 73% of pigs in Finland. Tonsil samples were tested by PCR targeted for yadA, and intestinal samples were cultured. All pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates represented bioserotype 4/O:3. The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil samples was 60% (95% confidence limit, 55.4 to 65.1%), and its prevalence in intestinal samples was 26% (95% confidence limit, 22.1 to 31.2%). The prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsil and intestinal samples varied between the four slaughterhouses. The tonsil prevalence of Y. enterocolitica was higher in slaughterhouse B, and the prevalence in intestinal content was higher in slaughterhouse C. There were more positive results in both tonsil and intestinal samples in pigs coming from fattening farms than in pigs coming from farrowing-and-fattening farms. A seasonal variation was observed in the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in intestinal samples, with the highest prevalence during July and August, but no seasonal variation was detected in tonsil samples.
PubMed ID
27052875 View in PubMed
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Reactive arthritis in a population exposed to an extensive waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak after sewage contamination in Pirkanmaa, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133668
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2011;40(5):358-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
T. Uotila
J. Antonen
J. Laine
E. Kujansuu
A-M Haapala
J. Lumio
R. Vuento
H. Oksa
J. Herrala
M. Kuusi
J. Mustonen
M. Korpela
Pirkanmaa Waterborne Outbreak Study Group
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rheumatic Diseases, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. uotila@pshp.fi
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2011;40(5):358-62
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthralgia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Arthritis, Reactive - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gastroenteritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
HLA-B27 Antigen - blood
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Severity of Illness Index
Sewage - microbiology
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the occurrence, clinical picture, and triggering infections of reactive arthritis (ReA) associated with a large waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak.
After an extensive sewage contamination of the water supply system, an estimated 8453 of the 30 016 inhabitants of the town of Nokia fell ill. General practitioners and occupational physicians were advised to refer any patients with suspicion of new ReA to rheumatological examination including faecal culture, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 and antibody tests for Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia.
Forty-five patients (33 females, 12 males) aged 16-77 years (median 53) were referred. ReA was diagnosed in 21, postinfectious arthralgia in 13, and other musculoskeletal conditions in 11 patients. HLA-B27 was positive in five out of 44 patients (11%). Of the 21 patients with ReA, possible triggering infections were observed in seven (33%), Campylobacter in four, Yersinia in three, and Salmonella in one, who also had Campylobacter infection. ReA was mild in all but one patient who presented with persistent Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis infection.
Taking into account the large population contaminated with potentially arthritogenic agents, the occurrence of ReA was rare and mild in character.
PubMed ID
21679096 View in PubMed
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Sources of sporadic Yersinia enterocolitica infection in children in Sweden, 2004: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92045
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Jun;137(6):897-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Boqvist S.
Pettersson H.
Svensson A.
Andersson Y.
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Zoonosis Centre, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden. Sofia.Boqvist@bvf.slu.se
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Jun;137(6):897-905
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fomites
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Meat - microbiology
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - isolation & purification
Abstract
Young children account for a large proportion of reported Yersinia enterocolitica infections in Sweden with a high incidence compared with other gastrointestinal infections, such as salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis. A case-control study was conducted to investigate selected risk factors for domestic sporadic yersiniosis in children aged 0-6 years in Sweden. In total, 117 cases and 339 controls were included in the study. To minimize exclusion of observations due to missing data a multiple non-parametric imputation technique was used. The following risk factors were identified in the multivariate analysis: eating food prepared from raw pork products (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8-5.1) or treated sausage (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3), use of a baby's dummy (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2) and contact with domestic animals (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4). We believe that the importance of Y. enterocolitica infection in children has been neglected and that results from this study can be used to develop preventive recommendations.
PubMed ID
18789174 View in PubMed
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[The prevalence of Yersinia and its serologic variants in patients with acute intestinal diseases of undetermined etiology in Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230443
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Aug;(8):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
L A Mitrikova
G Ia Tseneva
L B Kuliashova
G G Gurleva
N V Toluzakova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Aug;(8):17-20
Date
Aug-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Serotyping
Urban Population
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
Among Yersinia enterocolitica strains of 32 serovars, proposed as typing strains, some strains were found to belong to new species. Y. enterocolitica sensu stricto was represented by 21 serovars in the collection of typing strains. The occurrence of different Yersinia serovars in patients with acute enteric diseases of unknown etiology in Leningrad in 1983-1986 was determined with the use of the set of monoreceptor to 21 serovars. Out of 2,947 cultures studied by biochemical and serological methods, 81% were typed. Among them 18 Y. enterocolitica serovars were determined. Their characteristic feature was the prevalence of serovar O3 and an insignificant proportion of serovar O9. More frequently Yersinia were detected in patients with the primary diagnosis of acute enteric diseases (93.5%). The overwhelming majority (two-thirds) of Yersinia strains were isolated from children. A great number of strains detected in this study (70%) was isolated on days 10-15 of the bacteriological examination. In 927 cultures the following biovars were determined: the strains of serovar O3 belonged to biovar 4 and all other strains, to biovar 1.
PubMed ID
2531522 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.