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153 records – page 1 of 16.

Active commuting reduces the risk of wrist fractures in middle-aged women-the UFO study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125017
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Feb;24(2):533-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
U. Englund
P. Nordström
J. Nilsson
G. Hallmans
O. Svensson
U. Bergström
U. Pettersson-Kymmer
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. undis.englund@germed.umu.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Feb;24(2):533-40
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation - methods
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
Middle-aged women with active commuting had significantly lower risk for wrist fracture than women commuting by car/bus.
Our purpose was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle in middle-aged women was associated with a reduced risk of later sustaining a low-trauma wrist fracture.
The Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study is a population-based nested case-control study investigating associations between lifestyle and fragility fractures. From a cohort of ~35,000 subjects, we identified 376 female wrist fracture cases who had reported data regarding their commuting habits, occupational, and leisure physical activity, before they sustained their fracture. Each fracture case was compared with at least one control drawn from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total of 778 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 54.3?±?5.8 years, and mean age at fracture was 60.3?±?5.8 years.
Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, body mass index, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects with active commuting (especially walking) were at significantly lower risk of sustaining a wrist fracture (OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.27-0.88) compared with those who commuted by car or bus. Leisure time activities such as dancing and snow shoveling were also associated with a lower fracture risk, whereas occupational activity, training, and leisure walking or cycling were unrelated to fracture risk.
This study suggests that active commuting is associated with a lower wrist fracture risk, in middle-aged women.
PubMed ID
22525983 View in PubMed
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Acupressure treatment of morning sickness in pregnancy. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63832
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
A J Norheim
E J Pedersen
V. Fønnebø
L. Berge
Author Affiliation
Havnegata General Practice, Harstad, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupressure - instrumentation - methods
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Nausea - therapy
Norway
Placebos
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Urban Population
Wrist - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To find out whether acupressure wristband can alleviate nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled study. SUBJECTS: 97 women with mean gestational length completed 8-12 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms were recorded according to intensity, duration and nature of complaints. RESULTS: 71% of women in the intervention group reported both less intensive morning sickness and reduced duration of symptoms. The same tendency was seen in the placebo group, with 59% reporting less intensity and 63% shorter duration of symptoms. However, a significance level of 5% was reached only in the case of duration of symptoms, which was reduced by 2.74 hours in the intervention group compared to 0.85 hours in the placebo group (p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure wristband might be an alternative therapy for morning sickness in early pregnancy, especially before pharmaceutical treatment is considered.
PubMed ID
11303547 View in PubMed
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Association Between Distal Radial Fracture Malunion and Patient-Reported Activity Limitations: A Long-Term Follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301170
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-18-2018
Author
Muhanned Ali
Elisabeth Brogren
Philippe Wagner
Isam Atroshi
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Kristianstad and Hässleholm Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Date
Apr-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Casts, Surgical
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation - methods
Fracture Healing - physiology
Fractures, Malunited - physiopathology - surgery
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - physiopathology
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - physiopathology - surgery
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sweden
Wrist Joint - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The long-term effect of distal radial fracture malunion on activity limitations is unknown. Between 2001 and 2002, we conducted a prospective cohort study of all patients with distal radial fracture treated with casting or percutaneous fixation in northeast Scania in Sweden. In that original study, the patients completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at baseline and at 2 years. We performed a long-term follow-up study of patients who were 18 to 65 years of age at the time of the fracture to investigate the association between fracture malunion and activity limitations.
In this long-term follow-up, patients who had participated in the original study completed the DASH questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and for satisfaction (scored, 0 [best] to 100) and underwent radiographic and physical examinations at 12 to 14 years after the fracture. We defined malunion as dorsal angulation of =10°, ulnar variance of =3 mm, and/or radial inclination of =15°. We also assessed the presence of radiocarpal osteoarthritis and ulnar styloid nonunion. The primary outcome was the change in DASH score from baseline. Secondary outcomes were DASH, pain, and satisfaction scores, wrist range of motion, and grip strength at the time of the follow-up.
Of 85 eligible patients, 63 (74%) responded to the questionnaires and underwent examinations. Malunion was found in 25 patients, osteoarthritis was found in 38 patients, and styloid nonunion was found in 9 patients. Compared with patients without malunion, those with malunion had significantly worse DASH scores from baseline to 12 to 14 years (p = 0.002); the adjusted mean difference was 11 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 4 to 17 points). Similarly, follow-up scores were significantly worse among patients with malunion; the adjusted mean difference was 14 points (95% CI, 7 to 22 points; p 0.05) with DASH scores, VAS pain or satisfaction scores, or grip strength.
Patients who sustain a distal radial fracture at the age of 18 to 65 years and develop malunion are more likely to have worse long-term outcomes including activity limitations and pain.
Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Notes
CommentIn: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18;100(8):e52 PMID 29664861
PubMed ID
29664849 View in PubMed
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Association of radiographic hand osteoarthritis with radiographic knee osteoarthritis after meniscectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13842
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Feb;50(2):469-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
M. Englund
P T Paradowski
L S Lohmander
Author Affiliation
Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. martin.englund@ort.lu.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Feb;50(2):469-75
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroscopy
Female
Finger Joint - pathology - radiography
Hand
Humans
Male
Menisci, Tibial - injuries - surgery
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Wrist Joint - pathology - radiography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA), a disease with marked heredity, and radiographic knee OA in patients treated with meniscectomy. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 170 patients (mean age 54 years [range 33-87 years], 23% women) who had undergone isolated meniscectomy an average of 20 years earlier (range 17-22 years). Patients with cruciate ligament injury were excluded. All subjects were examined by standardized knee and hand radiography. Individual joints were considered to have OA when displaying radiographic features corresponding to a Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade > or =2. Hand OA was considered present if at least 1 of the following criteria was fulfilled: the presence of radiographic OA (K/L grade > or =2) in at least 1 interphalangeal joint in each hand symmetrically, or in at least 2 distal or proximal interphalangeal joints in the same hand in a pattern consistent with primary OA (in the same row or ray), or in the first carpometacarpal joint bilaterally. The association between radiographic hand OA and radiographic knee OA was evaluated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Radiographic hand OA was present in 57 patients (34%) and radiographic knee OA was identified in 105 patients (62%), within 94 index knees (55%) and 47 contralateral knees (28%). In a multivariate model, radiographic hand OA was associated with an increased likelihood of radiographic OA in the index knee (odds ratio [OR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.2-7.5) and in the nonoperated contralateral knee (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.0-12.2). CONCLUSION: The presence of radiographic hand OA is associated with an increased frequency of radiographic knee OA after meniscectomy. This finding confirms and extends that of a single previous study showing an interaction between hereditary and environmental risk factors for OA, a common and genetically complex disease. Accordingly, the development of OA following a meniscal tear and the resulting meniscal surgery should not be regarded to be of secondary origin only.
PubMed ID
14872489 View in PubMed
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Associations of early premenopausal fractures with subsequent fractures vary by sites and mechanisms of fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208947
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1997 Apr;60(4):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
R. Honkanen
M. Tuppurainen
H. Kroger
E. Alhava
E. Puntila
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1997 Apr;60(4):327-31
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Accidental Falls
Adult
Bone Density
Calcium - deficiency
Comorbidity
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Femur - radionuclide imaging
Finland - epidemiology
Fracture Healing
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Ovariectomy - statistics & numerical data
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Spine - radionuclide imaging
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
In a retrospective population-based study we assessed whether and how self-reported former fractures sustained at the ages of 20-34 are associated with subsequent fractures sustained at the ages of 35-57. The 12,162 women who responded to fracture questions of the baseline postal enquiry (in 1989) of the Kuopio Osteoporosis Study, Finland formed the study population. They reported 589 former and 2092 subsequent fractures. The hazard ratio (HR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), of a subsequent fracture was 1.9 (1.6-2.3) in women with the history of a former fracture compared with women without such a history. A former low-energy wrist fracture was related to subsequent low-energy wrist [HR = 3.7 (2.0-6.8)] and high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.4 (1.3-4.4)] fractures, whereas former high-energy nonwrist fractures were related only to subsequent high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.8 (1.9-4.1)] but not to low-energy wrist [HR = 0.7 (0.3-1.8)] fractures. The analysis of bone mineral density (BMD) data of a subsample of premenopausal women who underwent dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) during 1989-91 revealed that those with a wrist fracture due to a fall on the same level at the age of 20-34 recorded 6.5% lower spinal (P = 0.140) and 10.5% lower femoral (P = 0.026) BMD than nonfractured women, whereas the corresponding differences for women with a former nonwrist fracture due to high-energy trauma were -1.8% (P = 0.721) and -2.4% (P = 0. 616), respectively. Our results suggest that an early premenopausal, low-energy wrist fracture is an indicator of low peak BMD which predisposes to subsequent fractures in general, whereas early high-energy fractures are mainly indicators of other and more specific extraskeletal factors which mainly predispose to same types of subsequent fractures only.
PubMed ID
9075627 View in PubMed
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[Attempted suicide by injuries in the area of the wrist]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68647
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Feb 16;149(8):550-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-1987

Biphasic fracture risk in diabetes: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164405
Source
Bone. 2007 Jun;40(6):1595-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
William D Leslie
Lisa M Lix
Heather J Prior
Shelley Derksen
Colleen Metge
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (C5121), University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2H 2A6. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Bone. 2007 Jun;40(6):1595-601
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hip Fractures
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Fractures
Time Factors
Wrist Injuries
Abstract
Diabetes is associated with increased fracture rates but the effect size, time course and modifying factors are poorly understood. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of diabetes on fracture rates and possible interactions with age, duration of diabetes and comorbidity. A retrospective, population-based matched cohort study (1984-2004) was performed using the Population Health Information System (POPULIS) for the Province of Manitoba, Canada. The study cohort consisted of 82,094 diabetic adults and 236,682 non-diabetic matched controls. Diabetes was subclassified as long term, short term, and newly diagnosed. Number of ambulatory diagnostic groups (ADGs) was an index of comorbidity. Poisson regression was used to study counts of combined hip, wrist and spine (osteoporotic) fractures (5691 with diabetes and 16,457 without diabetes) and hip fractures (1901 with diabetes and 5224 without diabetes). Independent effects of longer duration of diabetes (p-for-trend
Notes
Comment In: Bone. 2008 Jan;42(1):235; author reply 23617974519
PubMed ID
17392047 View in PubMed
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Bone loss and wrist fractures after withdrawal of hormone therapy: The 15-year follow-up of the OSTPRE cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276528
Source
Maturitas. 2016 Mar;85:49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Jarmo Saarelainen
Saara Hassi
Risto Honkanen
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Joonas Sirola
Heikki Kröger
Marja H Komulainen
Marjo Tuppurainen
Source
Maturitas. 2016 Mar;85:49-55
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Femur
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lumbar Vertebrae
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Withholding Treatment
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Long-term bone mineral density (BMD) or fracture incidence changes after withdrawal of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) are not well known.
To study long-term postmenopausal bone loss and incidence of wrist fracture in respect to duration and withdrawal of self-reported HT.
A 15-year follow-up of the population-based prospective OSTPRE cohort in Kuopio, Finland.
Women (mean baseline age 53.4 years, range 48.1-59.6) were divided into four groups based on duration of HT: (1) never users (non-HT); (2) those who had used HT only throughout the 1st 5-year period (HT5); (3) throughout the first 10-years (HT10); (4) those who used HT throughout the entire 15-year follow-up (HT15).
Femoral (n=857) and spinal (n=599) BMD measurements with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were carried out at 5-year intervals in 1989-2004. Wrist fracture incidence in 1989-2004 was studied in a population of 5119 women.
The adjusted spinal BMD (L2-L4) changes by HT use during the entire 15-year follow-up were -4.8% for non-HT (p0.05) and +3.2% for HT15 (p0.05) groups. Comparing to non-HT group the risk of wrist fracture was reduced by 33% (p=0.045) in HT10 group and by 63% (p
PubMed ID
26857879 View in PubMed
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Calibration and cross-validation of a wrist-worn Actigraph in young preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266784
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
E. Johansson
U. Ekelund
H. Nero
C. Marcus
M. Hagströmer
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Calibration
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Play and Playthings
Reproducibility of Results
Sedentary lifestyle
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Wrist
Abstract
To calibrate the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist-worn placement in young preschoolers by developing intensity thresholds for sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity. Furthermore, to cross-validate the developed thresholds in young preschoolers.
Actigraph GT3X+ was used to measure physical activity during structured activities and free play in 38 children (15-36 months). Activity was video recorded and scored into sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity based on Children's Activity Rating Scale (CARS) and combined with accelerometer data using a 5?s epoch. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to develop intensity thresholds in 26 randomly selected children. The remaining 12 children were used for cross-validation.
Intensity thresholds for sedentary were =89 vertical counts (Y) and =221 vector magnitude (VM) counts per 5?s and =440 Y counts and =730 VM counts per 5?s for high-intensity physical activity. Sensitivity and specificity were 60-100% for the developed intensity thresholds. Strong correlations (Spearman rank correlation 0.69-0.91) were found in the cross-validation sample between the developed thresholds for the accelerometer and CARS scoring time in all intensity categories.
The developed intensity thresholds appear valid to categorize sedentary behaviour and physical activity intensity categories in children 2 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):74-625074290
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Aug;10(4):32825074065
PubMed ID
24408275 View in PubMed
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153 records – page 1 of 16.