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157 records – page 1 of 16.

Advancing our understanding of sibling supervision and injury risk for young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107263
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
Stacey L Schell
Bethany Keleher
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. Electronic address: bmorrong@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Canada
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Sibling Relations
Siblings - psychology
Video Recording
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
Sibling supervision has been shown to increase the risk of supervisee's unintentional injury in the home. Both poorer supervision by the older sibling and noncompliance by the younger sibling have been shown to contribute to this risk. Previous studies have shown that informing older siblings that they are responsible for the behavior of their younger sibling improves their supervision. The present study, conducted in Canada, examined whether informing both children the older child is in charge would improve both older sibling supervisory practices and compliance by the younger child. Younger and older siblings were initially placed in a room containing contrived hazards, and their interactions were unobtrusively recorded. In a second contrived hazards room, both children were then informed that the older sibling was in charge, and the supervisor was privately told not to let the supervisee touch hazardous objects. Results revealed that sibling supervisors showed improved supervision but supervisee behavior did not vary across conditions. Implications for injury prevention and future research directions are discussed.
PubMed ID
24034969 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and gender differences in school-age children's appraisals of injury risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204752
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 1998 Aug;23(4):229-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
L M Hillier
B A Morrongiello
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, Canada. hillier@julian.uwo.ca
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 1998 Aug;23(4):229-38
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Child
Female
Humans
Judgment
Male
Ontario
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
To examine age and gender differences in children's perception of injury risk and to evaluate cognitive factors that relate to their appraisal of risk.
The participants were 120 children (6 to 10 years of age), who used a series of photographs, which depicted play activities that varied from no to high risk, to appraise injury risk.
Children were able to distinguish varying degrees of injury risk. Boys rated risk as lower than girls, and 6-year-old children identified fewer risk factors and did so more slowly than 10-year-old children. For girls, perceived vulnerability to injury was the best predictor of injury risk ratings, whereas for boys it was judged severity of potential injury.
Children's appraisal of risk and age and gender differences in related factors highlight important components for injury prevention programs.
PubMed ID
9718896 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ageing and safety promotion--what do we know and where are we going?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72220
Source
Promot Educ. 1999 Dec;6(4):8-11, 42, 52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
L. Svanström
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden. leif.svanstrom@phs.ki.se
Source
Promot Educ. 1999 Dec;6(4):8-11, 42, 52
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Safety
Sweden
World Health Organization
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
PubMed ID
10693217 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska's model program for surveillance and prevention of occupational injury deaths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5931
Source
Public Health Rep. 1999 Nov-Dec;114(6):550-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G A Conway
J M Lincoln
B J Husberg
J C Manwaring
M L Klatt
T K Thomas
Author Affiliation
Alaska Field Station, Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage 99508, USA. gocl@cdc.gov
Source
Public Health Rep. 1999 Nov-Dec;114(6):550-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data - trends
Alaska
Humans
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Population Surveillance - methods
Program Development - methods - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
United States
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) established its Alaska Field Station in Anchorage in 1991 after identifying Alaska as the highest-risk state for traumatic worker fatalities. Since then, the Field Station, working in collaboration with other agencies, organizations, and individuals, has established a program for occupational injury surveillance in Alaska and formed interagency working groups to address the risk factors leading to occupational death and injury in the state. Collaborative efforts have contributed to reducing crash rates and mortality in Alaska's rapidly expanding helicopter logging industry and have played an important supportive role in the substantial progress made in reducing the mortality rate in Alaska's commercial fishing industry (historically Alaska's and America's most dangerous industry). Alaska experienced a 46% overall decline in work-related acute traumatic injury deaths from 1991 to 1998, a 64% decline in commercial fishing deaths, and a very sharp decline in helicopter logging-related deaths. Extending this regional approach to other parts of the country and applying these strategies to the entire spectrum of occupational injury and disease hazards could have a broad effect on reducing occupational injuries.
PubMed ID
10670623 View in PubMed
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All's fair. A unique EMS fair helps children learn what to do in an emergency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5937
Source
Emerg Med Serv. 1992 Jun;21(6):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992

Altering school attendance times to prevent child pedestrian injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115204
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2013;14(4):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Nikolaos Yiannakoulias
Widmer Bland
Darren M Scott
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S4K1. yiannan@mcmaster.ca
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2013;14(4):405-12
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Child
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Schools - organization & administration
Time Factors
Walking - injuries
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
The purpose of this research was to determine whether modifying school start time schedules can be used to reduce children's exposure to traffic on their morning walks to school.
We use models of pedestrian and motor vehicle commuting to estimate the frequency of encounters between child pedestrians and motor vehicles at intersections throughout the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. We use a simple heuristic to identify the school-specific start times that would most reduce the local frequency of encounters between motor vehicles and pedestrians.
Our analysis suggests that it may be possible to achieve an almost 15 percent reduction in the total number of encounters between child pedestrians and motor vehicles during the morning commute by staggering school start times such that the periods of high pedestrian activity are temporally staggered from periods of high motor vehicle activity. Our analysis suggests that small changes in school start times could be sufficient to see noteworthy reductions in pedestrian exposure to traffic.
Changing school times may be an effective, inexpensive, and practical tool for reducing child pedestrian injuries in urban environments. Enhanced transportation models and community-based interventions are natural next steps for exploring the use of school-specific scheduling to reduce the risk of child pedestrian injury. Further research is required to validate our models before this analysis should be used by policy makers.
PubMed ID
23531264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assignment of work involving farm tractors to children on North American farms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194145
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2001 Jul;40(1):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
B. Marlenga
W. Pickett
R L Berg
Author Affiliation
National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin 54449, USA. marlengb@mfldclin.edu
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2001 Jul;40(1):15-22
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Agriculture - instrumentation
Child
Child Welfare
Employment - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Midwestern United States
Ontario
Sex Distribution
Task Performance and Analysis
United States
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
Children are at high risk for tractor-related injury. The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) provide recommendations for the assignment of tractor work. This analysis describes tractor-related jobs assigned to farm children and compares them to NAGCAT.
A descriptive analysis was conducted of baseline data collected by telephone interview during a randomized, controlled trial.
The study population consisted of 1,138 children who worked on 498 North American farms. A total of 2,389 farm jobs were reported and 456 (19.1%) involved operation of farm tractors. Leading types of tractor jobs were identified. Modest, yet important, percentages of children were assigned tractor work before the minimum ages recommended by NAGCAT.
Children on farms are involved in tractor work at a young age and some are involved in jobs that they are unlikely to have the developmental abilities to perform. NAGCAT is a new parental resource that can be applied to these work situations.
PubMed ID
11439393 View in PubMed
Less detail

BCMA becomes first Canadian medical group to form Committee on Violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210565
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1477-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
E. LeBourdais
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1477-9
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Physician's Role
Physicians
Rape - prevention & control
Societies, Medical
Violence - prevention & control
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
The British Columbia Medical Association has established a Committee on Violence to look at the impact violence has on society and help find ways to educate physicians about how to identify, counsel and prevent violent behaviour. The issue is becoming more pressing as downsizing closes mental-health facilities, putting more potentially violent patients on the streets.
PubMed ID
8943939 View in PubMed
Less detail

157 records – page 1 of 16.