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179 records – page 1 of 18.

[40 years of activity of the Traumatologic Center of the Moscow region of Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254325
Source
Ortop Travmatol Protez. 1973 Oct;34(10):84-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1973

Adapting the Swedish Armed Forces medical services to meet new challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196201
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):824-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
E. Dalenius
Author Affiliation
Swedish Armed Forces Medical Centre, S-66381 Hammaro, Sweden.
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):824-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Sweden
War
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The land battle today is different from that of 20 years ago. It now occurs over vast areas, the fluid battlefield. Tanks have undergone important changes (cross-country capability, improved armor, and more lethal weapons). The combat units contain armored personnel carriers, providing protection for the soldier. The weapon effects on armored vehicle personnel are well studied and include ballistic, blast, thermal, and toxic injury. However, casualty statistics for armored units are not extensively reported. The public acceptance of casualties, especially in peacekeeping operations, today is much lower than in the past. A study by the Swedish Armed Forces has identified the need for a new organizational structure. Casualties will be picked up on the battlefield by armored medical evacuation vehicles and transported directly to the battalion aid station. The training level of all medical personnel must be increased, using battlefield-related trauma courses and making better use of existing resources in the form of qualified medical practitioners.
PubMed ID
11143427 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Advanced Trauma Life Support course for senior medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223037
Source
Can J Surg. 1992 Oct;35(5):541-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
J. Ali
M. Howard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Surg. 1992 Oct;35(5):541-5
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Educational Measurement
Humans
Life Support Care
Traumatology - education
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The authors conducted the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) Course for 90 students who were in their 4th year of medicine at the University of Manitoba. The impact of the course was evaluated through questionnaires completed by students, instructors and emergency-room physicians. The students' performances were also compared with those of 96 practising physicians who took the ATLS course in Manitoba. The failure rate for students (3.3%) was not statistically different from that for practising physicians (4.2%). Overall, the students' performances in the written test were better (55% of students scored over 90% on the test compared with 15% of practising physicians). The student-to-faculty ratio was 1.5:1 and included 21 physician-instructors. Ninety-five percent of the faculty and students suggested that this course should be mandatory in the 4th year curriculum of medicine and that the course improves trauma care provided by the students and interns by increasing their confidence and improving communication with specialist surgeons. However, 10% of the faculty suggested that more time should be allocated to the surgical-skills practicum. The authors' experience with this program suggests that the ATLS course should be uniformly incorporated in the Canadian undergraduate 4th year medical curriculum and that techniques used in this course should be considered in other areas of the undergraduate medical curriculum.
PubMed ID
1393872 View in PubMed
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Analysis of a medical tent at the Toronto Caribana Parade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190525
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2002 Apr-Jun;6(2):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian M Furst
George K B Sándor
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Cambridge Memorial Hospital, Ontario, Canada. ian_furst@yahoo.com
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2002 Apr-Jun;6(2):199-203
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anniversaries and Special Events
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Planning Techniques
Triage
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
To review the experience with an on-site medical tent for a mass gathering and to analyze patient records in a manner to more appropriately allocate resources and identify possible delays in definitive care.
The logistics of providing an on-site medical tent is reviewed, followed by a retrospective chart review of 126 patients over a two-year period. Prior to the chart review, an injury classification was developed that categorized patients based on the necessity of transport to hospital. Data were also analyzed for times of peak patient flow, types of injuries, and needless delays in definitive care.
An average of 63 patients (95% CI 44-77) were seen in the tent and 1.3 patients sought care per 10,000 spectators. Peak times were between 1600 and 2000 hours. The average number of patients each hour was 6.5 (95% CI 0-13). Severe, intermediate, and minor injuries accounted for 16%, 38%, and 46% of total injuries, respectively. Nine cases were found where the patients arrived and left the medical tent by ambulance. Four of these instances may have represented a needless delay in definitive care. The details of each of these cases are reviewed.
The results indicate that on-site medical coverage, with appropriate supports, is indeed safe. The frame-work provided with regard to setup and analysis of work-load will help others in the planning of medical care for similar mass gatherings.
PubMed ID
11962567 View in PubMed
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[Anesthetic methods in a military anesthesiologist's practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160892
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2007 Jul-Aug;(4):15-8
Publication Type
Article

[Are ambulances manned by physicians used in a sufficient extent for trauma patients?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217568
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Aug 1;156(31):4467-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1994
Author
T B Hansen
P H Christensen
P. Elkjaer
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling og anaestesiafdelingen, Holstebro Centralsygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Aug 1;156(31):4467-9
Date
Aug-1-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Physicians
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate, how often a hospital-based ambulance manned by medical doctors from the intensive care unit took part in prehospital treatment and transportation of severely injured patients in the Holstebro area. The design was a retrospective investigation based on reports concerning all trauma patients admitted by ambulance to Holstebro Central Hospital during the period 1.1.1990 to 31.12.1990 (171 admissions). All cases were classified according to the AIS-scale (1990 version) and the ISS-score was calculated for all patients. Of a total of 198 calls where the hospital based ambulance was activated, only 18 (9.1%) were for trauma patients. Five of the trauma patients were dead when the ambulance arrived, and 13 were admitted to hospital. Median ISS in the group of patients that was transported by a standard ambulance was 8.6 (1-18), and 12.7 (1-43) in the group of patients that was transported by the special ambulance manned by medical doctors. Fifteen patients (68.2%) out of the group of patients with an ISS-score > 12 were transported by standard ambulance. We thus conclude that the activation of the hospital-based ambulance manned with medical doctors to trauma patients has to be improved, so that all severely traumatised patients are transported by this kind of ambulance instead of by a standard ambulance.
PubMed ID
8066954 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are severely injured trauma victims in Norway offered advanced pre-hospital care? National, retrospective, observational cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289467
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
T Wisborg
E N Ellensen
I Svege
T Dehli
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Trauma, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Air Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Multiple Trauma
Norway
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Triage
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Studies of severely injured patients suggest that advanced pre-hospital care and/or rapid transportation provides a survival benefit. This benefit depends on the disposition of resources to patients with the greatest need. Norway has 19 Emergency Helicopters (HEMS) staffed by anaesthesiologists on duty 24/7/365. National regulations describe indications for their use, and the use of the national emergency medical dispatch guideline is recommended. We assessed whether severely injured patients had been treated or transported by advanced resources on a national scale.
A national survey was conducted collecting data for 2013 from local trauma registries at all hospitals caring for severely injured patients. Patients were analysed according to hospital level; trauma centres or acute care hospitals with trauma functions. Patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were considered severely injured.
Three trauma centres (75%) and 17 acute care hospitals (53%) had data for trauma patients from 2013, a total of 3535 trauma registry entries (primary admissions only), including 604 victims with an ISS > 15. Of these 604 victims, advanced resources were treating and/or transporting 51%. Sixty percent of the severely injured admitted directly to trauma centres received advanced services, while only 37% of the severely injured admitted primarily to acute care hospitals received these services.
A highly developed and widely distributed HEMS system reached only half of severely injured trauma victims in Norway in 2013.
Notes
Cites: Air Med J. 2003 May-Jun;22(3):35-41 PMID 12748530
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 May 10;24:66 PMID 27164973
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 Mar;59(3):384-91 PMID 25582880
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2015 Oct;32(10):813-6 PMID 25527473
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Nov 12;22:64 PMID 25388400
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):10-20 PMID 19853251
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Oct;57(9):1175-85 PMID 24001223
Cites: N Z Med J. 2014 Sep 12;127(1402):30-42 PMID 25228419
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-96 PMID 4814394
Cites: Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52 PMID 19540486
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014;18 Suppl 1:35-44 PMID 24279767
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):660-8 PMID 23289798
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):27-9 PMID 19524235
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):659-67 PMID 26810562
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Jul;58(6):726-32 PMID 24773521
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Dec 15;(12):CD009228 PMID 26671262
Cites: BMC Emerg Med. 2013 Jul 01;13:11 PMID 23815080
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2014 Nov;49(11):1673-7 PMID 25475816
Cites: Injury. 2015 Jul;46(7):1197-206 PMID 25863418
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012 Dec 18;20:82 PMID 23244708
Cites: World J Surg. 2007 Nov;31(11):2092-103 PMID 17899256
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2015 Feb;50(2):347-52 PMID 25638635
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2013 Oct;62(4):351-364.e19 PMID 23582619
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009 Jan 09;17:1 PMID 19134177
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2008 Aug 28;16:7 PMID 18957069
PubMed ID
28653327 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are severely injured trauma victims in Norway offered advanced pre-hospital care? National, retrospective, observational cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289625
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
T Wisborg
E N Ellensen
I Svege
T Dehli
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Trauma, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Air Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Multiple Trauma
Norway
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Triage
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Studies of severely injured patients suggest that advanced pre-hospital care and/or rapid transportation provides a survival benefit. This benefit depends on the disposition of resources to patients with the greatest need. Norway has 19 Emergency Helicopters (HEMS) staffed by anaesthesiologists on duty 24/7/365. National regulations describe indications for their use, and the use of the national emergency medical dispatch guideline is recommended. We assessed whether severely injured patients had been treated or transported by advanced resources on a national scale.
A national survey was conducted collecting data for 2013 from local trauma registries at all hospitals caring for severely injured patients. Patients were analysed according to hospital level; trauma centres or acute care hospitals with trauma functions. Patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were considered severely injured.
Three trauma centres (75%) and 17 acute care hospitals (53%) had data for trauma patients from 2013, a total of 3535 trauma registry entries (primary admissions only), including 604 victims with an ISS > 15. Of these 604 victims, advanced resources were treating and/or transporting 51%. Sixty percent of the severely injured admitted directly to trauma centres received advanced services, while only 37% of the severely injured admitted primarily to acute care hospitals received these services.
A highly developed and widely distributed HEMS system reached only half of severely injured trauma victims in Norway in 2013.
Notes
Cites: Air Med J. 2003 May-Jun;22(3):35-41 PMID 12748530
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 May 10;24:66 PMID 27164973
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 Mar;59(3):384-91 PMID 25582880
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2015 Oct;32(10):813-6 PMID 25527473
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Nov 12;22:64 PMID 25388400
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):10-20 PMID 19853251
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Oct;57(9):1175-85 PMID 24001223
Cites: N Z Med J. 2014 Sep 12;127(1402):30-42 PMID 25228419
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-96 PMID 4814394
Cites: Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52 PMID 19540486
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014;18 Suppl 1:35-44 PMID 24279767
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):660-8 PMID 23289798
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):27-9 PMID 19524235
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):659-67 PMID 26810562
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Jul;58(6):726-32 PMID 24773521
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Dec 15;(12):CD009228 PMID 26671262
Cites: BMC Emerg Med. 2013 Jul 01;13:11 PMID 23815080
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2014 Nov;49(11):1673-7 PMID 25475816
Cites: Injury. 2015 Jul;46(7):1197-206 PMID 25863418
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012 Dec 18;20:82 PMID 23244708
Cites: World J Surg. 2007 Nov;31(11):2092-103 PMID 17899256
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2015 Feb;50(2):347-52 PMID 25638635
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2013 Oct;62(4):351-364.e19 PMID 23582619
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009 Jan 09;17:1 PMID 19134177
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2008 Aug 28;16:7 PMID 18957069
PubMed ID
28653327 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189025
Source
Can J Surg. 2002 Aug;45(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Richard Simons
Andrew Kirkpatrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. rsimons@vanhosp.bc.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2002 Aug;45(4):288-95
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Canada
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Societies, Medical
Trauma Centers - standards
United States
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed.
PubMed ID
12174987 View in PubMed
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179 records – page 1 of 18.