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38 records – page 1 of 4.

Active and passive distraction in children undergoing wound dressings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122420
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Stefan Nilsson
Karin Enskär
Carina Hallqvist
Eva Kokinsky
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden. stefan_r.nilsson@hb.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bandages - adverse effects
Candy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Video Games
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test how distraction influences pain, distress and anxiety in children during wound care. Sixty participants aged 5-12 years were randomized to three groups: serious gaming, the use of lollipops and a control group. Self-reported pain, distress, anxiety and observed pain behaviour were recorded in conjunction with wound care. Serious gaming, an active distraction, reduced the observed pain behaviour and self-reported distress compared with the other groups. A sense of control and engagement in the distraction, together, may be the explanation for the different pain behaviours when children use serious gaming.
PubMed ID
22819747 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A day in the collective gardens. Interview by Viveka Holmertz.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39789
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Aug 16;8(13-14):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1984
Author
B. Nilsson
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Aug 16;8(13-14):4-7
Date
Aug-16-1984
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Community Health Nursing
Female
Humans
Male
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
PubMed ID
6570911 View in PubMed
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Ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill and injured children: A difficult aspect of ambulance nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264168
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Charlotte Nordén
Karin Hult
Åsa Engström
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Child
Critical Illness - nursing
Emergency Nursing
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
Ambulance nurses work daily in both emergency and non-emergency situations that can be demanding. One emotionally demanding situation for ambulance nurses is to nurse children who are ill.
The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill or injured children.
Eight specialist ambulance nurses were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
The analysis resulted in one theme, a difficult aspect of ambulance nursing care, with five categories. The security of both child and parents was considered to be paramount. Ambulance nurses felt relieved when they handed over the responsibility and the child to the receiving unit. The ambulance nurses felt that more training, education and follow-up was desirable in order to increase their security when nursing children.
Ambulance nurses are subject to stressful feelings while nursing children. As providing reassurance to the child and its parents is a cornerstone of the treatment, it is important for the ambulance nurses to take the time to build up a trusting relationship in such an encounter. Skill development in the area might lead to increased security and reduce the mental burden resulting from negative stress.
PubMed ID
23711561 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Jun 22;81(11):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-1993
Author
S. Barstad
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Jun 22;81(11):24-5
Date
Jun-22-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Packaged
Humans
Military Nursing
Norway
Wounds and Injuries - nursing - surgery
PubMed ID
8117500 View in PubMed
Less detail

The CAET Academy Knowledge to Practice Program--culturally competent continuing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120928
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2012 Sep-Oct;39(5):479-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
Virginia McNaughton
Author Affiliation
CAET Academy, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2012 Sep-Oct;39(5):479-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Cultural Competency - education
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Ostomy - nursing
Specialties, Nursing - education
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
PubMed ID
22955302 View in PubMed
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Canadian enterostomal therapy nurses advancing wound, ostomy and continence nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124527
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2012 May-Jun;39(3):240-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy Parslow
Janet Kuhnke
Kathryn Kozell
Author Affiliation
Enterostomal and Wound Care, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2012 May-Jun;39(3):240-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Enterostomy - nursing
Fecal Incontinence - nursing
Humans
Nurse's Role
Specialties, Nursing - standards
Surgical Stomas
Total Quality Management
Urinary Incontinence - nursing
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
PubMed ID
22572895 View in PubMed
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[Collaboration between nurses and nurse's aides in wound care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160665
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2007 Sep-Oct;5(1):12-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Truc Huynh
Michelle Nadon
Author Affiliation
CSSS de la Montagne de Montréal.
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2007 Sep-Oct;5(1):12-22
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Delegation, Professional
Emotions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurses' Aides - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Culture
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Quebec
Questionnaires
Skin Care - nursing
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
This qualitative study describes the collaborative relationship between the Registered Nurses (RNs) and the Registered Nursing Assistants (RNAs) in wound care. Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and participants observation were used to explore how 3 RNs and 3 RNAs interact in wound care. The findings suggest that two levels of intrapersonal processes constitute the collaborative endeavor. The first level is the intrapersonal process within RNs/RNAs to shape their practice according to their professional roles. The second level is the intrapersonal emotional labor carried out by RNs/RNAs to find balance between their respect for the other group as a whole and their trust for certain individual RNs/RNAs. Intradisciplinary collaboration may contribute to work satisfaction and excellence in patient care. RNs and RNAs are called upon to increase their awareness and understanding of the emotional labor underpinning their interpersonal interactions in order to maintain and promote collaboration at the workplace. It is proposed that nurse managers at all levels promote a culture of collaboration and provide time and space in which the emotional labor of frontline staff is recognized, voiced and valued.
PubMed ID
17955884 View in PubMed
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A comparison of experiences of training emergency care in military exercises and competences among conscript nurses with different levels of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84983
Source
Mil Med. 2007 Oct;172(10):1046-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Johansson Anders
Odén Anders
Dahlgren Lars-Owe
Sjöström Björn
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköpings University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Mil Med. 2007 Oct;172(10):1046-52
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Emergency medical services
Humans
Leadership
Military Medicine
Military Nursing - education
Military Personnel
Questionnaires
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The military emergency care education of nurses is primarily concerned with the treatment of soldiers with combat-related injuries. Even though great progress has been made in military medicine, there is still the pedagogical question of what emergency care education for military nurses should contain and how it should be taught. The aim of this study was to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education. A descriptive study was performed to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education in nursing. There were statistical differences between nurses with general nursing education and nurses with a general nursing education and supplementary education. A reasonable implication of the differences is that the curriculum must be designed differently depending on the educational background of the students. Hence, there is an interaction between background characteristics, e.g., the level of previous education and differences pertaining to clinical experience of the participants, and the impact of the exercise itself.
PubMed ID
17985764 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.