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2012 Pediatric Report: devastating at any age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116028
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Richard J Fantus
Michael L Nance
Author Affiliation
Trauma Services, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, USA.
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
General Surgery
Humans
Infant
Pediatrics
Registries
Research Report
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
PubMed ID
23441511 View in PubMed
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Accident rates and types among self-employed private forest owners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100478
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ola Lindroos
Lage Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Causality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forestry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Half of all Swedish forests are owned by private individuals, and at least 215,000 people work in these privately owned forest holdings. However, only lethal accidents are systematically monitored among self-employed forest workers. Therefore, data from the registries of the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the Labor Insurance Organization and the regional University Hospital in Umeå were gathered to allow us to perform a more in-depth assessment of the rate and types of accidents that occurred among private forest owners. We found large differences between the registries in the type and number of accidents that were reported. We encountered difficulties in defining "self-employed forest worker" and also in determining whether the accidents that did occur happened during work or leisure time. Consequently, the estimates for the accident rate that we obtained varied from 32 to > or = 4300 injured persons per year in Sweden, depending on the registry that was consulted, the definition of the sample population that was used, and the accident severity definition that was employed. Nevertheless, the different registries gave a consistent picture of the types of accidents that occur while individuals are participating in self-employed forestry work. Severe accidents were relatively common, as self-employed forestry work fatalities constituted 7% of the total number of fatalities in the work authority registry. Falling trees were associated with many of these fatal accidents as well as with accidents that resulted in severe non-fatal injuries. Thus, unsafe work methods appeared more related to the occurrence of an accident than the equipment that was being used at the time of the accident (e.g., a chainsaw). Improvement of the workers' skills should therefore be considered to be an important prevention measure that should be undertaken in this field. The challenges in improving the safety in these smallest of companies, which fall somewhere between the purview of occupational and consumer safety, are exemplified and discussed.
PubMed ID
20728623 View in PubMed
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Adolescent injury deaths and hospitalization in Canada: magnitude and temporal trends (1979-2003).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162925
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Jul;41(1):84-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Sai Yi Pan
Marie Desmeules
Howard Morrison
Robert Semenciw
Anne-Marie Ugnat
Wendy Thompson
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Sai_Yi_Pan@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Jul;41(1):84-92
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
To understand the magnitude and the national trends of mortality and hospitalization due to injuries among Canadian adolescents aged 15-19 years in 1979-2003.
Data on injury deaths and hospitalizations were obtained from the national Vital Statistical System and the Hospital Morbidity Database. Injuries were classified by intent and by mechanism.
In 15-19-year-olds, 75.6% of all deaths and 16.6% of all hospitalizations were attributed to injuries. Unintentional and self-inflicted injuries accounted for 70.2% and 24.1%, respectively, of total injury deaths as well as 72.6% and 17.4%, respectively, of total injury hospitalizations. The main causes for injury were motor vehicle traffic-related injury (MVT), suffocation, firearm, poisoning, and drowning for injury deaths; and MVT, poisoning, fall, struck by/against, and cut/pierce for injury hospitalizations. Mortality and hospitalization rates of total and unintentional injuries decreased substantially, whereas those of self-inflicted injuries decreased only slightly, with a small increase in females. Rates also decreased for all causes except suffocation, which showed an increasing trend. Males had higher rates for all intents and causes than females, except for self-inflicted injury hospitalization (higher in females). The territories and Prairie Provinces also had higher ones of total injuries and self-inflicted injuries than in other provinces.
Injury is the leading cause of deaths and a major source of hospitalizations in Canadian adolescents. However, prevention programs in Canada have made significant progress in reducing injury mortality and hospitalization. The graduated driver licensing, enforcement of seat-belt use, speed limit and alcohol control, and Canadian tough gun control may have contributed to the decline.
PubMed ID
17577538 View in PubMed
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Adolescent survey non-response and later risk of death. A prospective cohort study of 78,609 persons with 11-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163423
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, 33101 Tampere, Finland. ville.mattila@uta.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:87
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Non-response in survey studies is a growing problem and, being usually selective, it leads to under- or overestimation of health outcomes in the follow-up. We followed both respondents and non-respondents by registry linkage to determine whether there is a risk of death, related to non-response at baseline.
Sample data of biennial surveys to 12-18-year-old Finns in 1979-1997 were linked with national death registry up to 2001. The number of respondents was 62,528 (79.6%) and non-respondents 16,081 (20.4%). The average follow-up was 11.1 years, totalling 876,400 person-years. The risk of death between non-respondents and respondents was estimated by hazard ratios (HR).
The number of deaths per 100,000 person-years were 229 in non-respondents and 447 in respondents (HR 2.0, 95% CI: 1.5-2.6). The hazard ratios of death were for intoxication 3.2 (95% CI: 1.9-5.4), for disease 3.1 (95% CI: 2.2-4.1), for violence-related injury 2.0 (95% CI: 1.5-2.6) and for unintentional injury 1.8 (95% CI: 1.3-2.4) in non-respondents vs. respondents. The association between non-response and death increased with age at baseline, and the increase persisted after the age of 25.
Our study demonstrated significantly increased rates of death among adolescent non-respondents in a follow-up. The highest hazard ratios were seen in disease- and violence-related deaths. The death rate varied between respondents and non-respondents by death type. Increased rates of death persisted beyond the age of 25.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug 15;154(4):373-8411495861
Cites: J Public Health Med. 2002 Dec;24(4):285-9112546205
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(5):437-4415233316
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;13(2):195-2009085004
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):77-828367686
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1995 Jun;23(2):129-367676219
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1987 Dec;41(4):295-93455423
PubMed ID
17519009 View in PubMed
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Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
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Age and gender distributions of pedestrian accidents across the life-span.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35569
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1994 Dec;79(3 Pt 2):1680-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
J. Kingma
Author Affiliation
Department of Traumatology, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1994 Dec;79(3 Pt 2):1680-2
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Walking - injuries
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Causes of pedestrian accidents (N = 534) were investigated for patients treated for injuries at the emergency unit of a hospital. Accidents in collisions with motor vehicles were the main cause (87.8%). Young children (0-9 years old) and the elderly (above 60 years of age) are the most vulnerable in terms of mortality rates observed in these age groups. Preponderance of males in pedestrian accidents was observed in the accident categories of collisions with motor vehicle and bicycle, whereas a slight preponderance of females was found in collisions with other traffic. The predominant age groups were located in the range from 0 through 19 years.
PubMed ID
7870561 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol and traffic-injured patients. A 1-year prospective study of hospitalized traffic-injured patients and fatal traffic accidents in Esbjerg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12652
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 Sep 29;148(40):2575-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1986

Alcohol control and injury death in Alaska native communities: wet, damp and dry under Alaska's local option law.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3646
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Mar;61(2):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M. Berman
T. Hull
P. May
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Mar;61(2):311-9
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Cause of Death
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This article tests whether different forms of community-level alcohol control significantly affect injury deaths in a population with extremely high injury mortality. METHOD: The 1981 Alaska local option law provides a natural experiment for studying how implementation of community level controls may be associated with changes in injury deaths, most of which are alcohol-related, among Alaska Natives living in small communities. The study compares population and community-specific death rates under different levels of alcohol control for the 97 communities that passed restrictions between 1980 and 1993 with the death rates in the same communities during periods when no restrictions were in place. RESULTS: Injury death rates were generally lower during periods when alcohol sales, importation or possession were restricted than when no restrictions were in place (wet). More restrictive controls (dry) significantly reduced homicides; less restrictive control options (damp) reduced suicides. Accident and homicide death rates fell, on average, by 74 and 66 per 100,000, respectively, for the 89 communities that banned sale and importation or possession. A control group of 61 small communities that did not change control status under the law showed no significant changes over time in accident or homicide death rates. CONCLUSIONS: The changes in accidental and homicide death rates are statistically significant, although these reduced rates remain 2.5 to 7 times national death rates. The isolated nature of Alaskan villages may explain why alcohol control has more effect in Alaska than has been found in studies of Native Americans living in other states.
PubMed ID
10757142 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, psychoactive drugs and fatal road traffic accidents in Norway: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101813
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2011 May;43(3):1197-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Hallvard Gjerde
Per T Normann
Asbjørg S Christophersen
Sven Ove Samuelsen
Jørg Mørland
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Forensic Toxicology and Drug Abuse, Lovisenberggata 6, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. Hallvard.Gjerde@fhi.no
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2011 May;43(3):1197-203
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Ethanol - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotropic Drugs - blood
Substance Abuse Detection
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - mortality
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
A case-control study was conducted on 204 drivers fatally injured in road traffic accidents in south-eastern Norway during the period 2003-2008. Cases from single vehicle accidents (N = 68) were assessed separately. As controls, 10540 drivers selected in a roadside survey in the same geographical area during 2005-2006 were used. Blood samples were collected from the cases and oral fluid (saliva) samples from the controls. Samples were analysed for alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, opioid analgesics, hypnotics, sedatives and a muscle relaxant; altogether 22 psychoactive substances. Equivalent cutoff concentrations for blood and oral fluid were used. The risk for fatal injury in a road traffic accident was estimated using logistic regression adjusting for gender, age, season of the year, and time of the week. The odds for involvement in fatal road traffic accidents for different substances or combination of substances were in increasing order: single drug
PubMed ID
21376919 View in PubMed
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273 records – page 1 of 28.