Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

The building blocks of a professional response to Indigenous injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153202
Source
Injury. 2008 Dec;39 Suppl 5:S73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kelvin Kong
Russell L Gruen
Author Affiliation
John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. kelvinkongent@gmail.com
Source
Injury. 2008 Dec;39 Suppl 5:S73-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australasia
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care - standards
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control - therapy
PubMed ID
19130921 View in PubMed
Less detail

The challenges of developing a trauma system for Indigenous people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153203
Source
Injury. 2008 Dec;39 Suppl 5:S43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Frank Plani
Phil Carson
Author Affiliation
Trauma Surgery, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT, Australia. frank.plani@nt.gov.au
Source
Injury. 2008 Dec;39 Suppl 5:S43-53
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Population Groups
Program Development
Traumatology - organization & administration - trends
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control - therapy
Abstract
Trauma systems have been shown to provide the best trauma care for injured patients. A trauma system developed for Indigenous people should take into account many factors including geographical remoteness and cultural diversity. Indigenous people suffer from a significant intentional and non-intentional burden of injury, often greater than non-Indigenous populations, and a public health approach in dealing with trauma can be adopted. This includes transport issues, prevention and control of intentional violence, cultural sensitization of health providers, community emergency responses, community rehabilitation and improving resilience. The ultimate aim is to decrease the trauma burden through a trauma system with which indigenous people can fully identify.
PubMed ID
19130917 View in PubMed
Less detail

Getting to the root of trauma in Canada's Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175312
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1023-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Nadine R Caron
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Northern Medical Program, Prince George, BC. caronn@unbc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1023-4
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Apr 16;166(8):1029-3512002979
Cites: Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2000 Dec;21(4):339-4211111793
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2001 Jun;16(2):169-7711356755
Cites: Public Health. 2001 Jan;115(1):44-5011402351
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1007-1115824405
Cites: Inj Control Saf Promot. 2002 Sep;9(3):199-20512462174
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Aug 23;327(7412):419-2212933728
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-788956834
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 3;349(9061):1269-769142060
Comment On: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1007-1115824405
PubMed ID
15824407 View in PubMed
Less detail

The prevention of unintentional injury among American Indian and Alaska Native children: a subject review. Committee on Native American Child Health and Committee on Injury and Poison Prevention. American Academy of Pediatrics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5933
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Dec;104(6):1397-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Dec;104(6):1397-9
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Humans
Indians, North American
Risk factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Among ethnic groups in the United States, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children experience the highest rates of injury mortality and morbidity. Injury mortality rates for AI/AN children have decreased during the past quarter century, but remain almost double the rate for all children in the United States. The Indian Health Service (IHS), the federal agency with the primary responsibility for the health care of AI/AN people, has sponsored an internationally recognized injury prevention program designed to reduce the risk of injury death by addressing community-specific risk factors. Model programs developed by the IHS and tribal governments have led to successful outcomes in motor vehicle occupant safety, drowning prevention, and fire safety. Injury prevention programs in tribal communities require special attention to the sovereignty of tribal governments and the unique cultural aspects of health care and communication. Pediatricians working with AI/AN children on reservations or in urban environments are strongly urged to collaborate with tribes and the IHS to create community-based coalitions and develop programs to address highly preventable injury-related mortality and morbidity. Strong advocacy also is needed to promote childhood injury prevention as an important priority for federal agencies and tribes.
PubMed ID
10585996 View in PubMed
Less detail

A systematic review of community interventions to improve Aboriginal child passenger safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104442
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Takuro Ishikawa
Eugenia Oudie
Ediriweera Desapriya
Kate Turcotte
Ian Pike
Author Affiliation
Takuro Ishikawa, Eugenia Oudie, Kate Turcotte, and Ian Pike are with, and Ediriweera Desapriya was with the BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit; the University of British Columbia; and the Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e1-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child Restraint Systems - utilization
Community Health Planning
Cultural Characteristics
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
We evaluated evidence of community interventions to improve Aboriginal child passenger safety (CPS) in terms of its scientific merit and cultural relevance. We included studies if they reported interventions to improve CPS in Aboriginal communities, compared at least pre- and postintervention conditions, and evaluated rates and severity of child passenger injuries, child restraint use, or knowledge of CPS. We also appraised quality and cultural relevance of studies. Study quality was associated with community participation and cultural relevance. Strong evidence showed that multicomponent interventions tailored to each community improves CPS. Interventions in Aboriginal communities should incorporate Aboriginal views of health, involve the community, and be multicomponent and tailored to the community's circumstances and culture.
PubMed ID
24754652 View in PubMed
Less detail

Unmet needs of children in Canada's north: nutrition, injury prevention and problems of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4924
Source
Pages 554-557 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
M E Moffatt
Author Affiliation
J.A. Hildes Northern Medical Unit, Department of Community Health Sciences, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Pages 554-557 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services
Canada
Child
Child Health Services
Child Nutrition Disorders - ethnology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Inuits
Social Problems
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
1365224 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.